IV Vitamin Therapy in Haworth, NJ | Juventee Medical Spa

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IV Vitamin Therapy in Haworth, NJ

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IV Vitamin Therapy Haworth, NJ

If you're like most adults, your parents probably loaded you up with vitamin C whenever you had the sniffles or a cold. Your younger self might not have believed it worked, but as it turns out, your parents were onto something. According to doctors, vitamin C is one of the most important vitamins to consume. It might not be the cure-all for the common cold, but it absolutely helps maintain your immune system so you can fight the cold quicker. Also known as ascorbic acid, vitamin C also protects your body from prenatal health issues, cardiovascular problems, eye diseases, and even wrinkly skin.

When your body lacks vitamin C for a long time, you're sure to notice. Though vitamin C deficiency is relatively rare in the U.S., adults who go long periods without it may get sick frequently and suffer from other immune system issues. In extreme cases, people may get scurvy, which causes a litany of issues like joint pain, bleeding gums, and depression.

Vitamin-C

B vitamins like riboflavin (B2), niacin (B3), folic acid (b9), and cobalamin (B12) play a crucial role in keeping you healthy and maintaining your overall wellbeing. If you want a healthier body, B vitamins are critical, as they are literally building blocks that help preserve your brain functionality, cell metabolism, and energy. For pregnant women, B vitamins in IV drips are especially important because they help your new baby's brain develop while in the womb. B vitamins have also been shown to prevent congenital disabilities. Plus, they help ease feelings of nausea, which is a big bonus for moms and dads alike.

When your body is vitamin B deficient, you're putting yourself at risk of many health problems, such as complications with pregnancy, nervous system disorders, amenia, and gastric cancers.

Vitamin-B

Like the other vitamins and nutrients on this page, magnesium plays an important part in your body's total health. As a cofactor or helper molecule, magnesium has a role in 600+ bodily functions, including protein formation, nerve function, gene function, muscle movement, and energy production. If you're having a stressful day or week, high-potency magnesium has been shown to have relaxation properties that help calm your nerves and muscles. Unfortunately, most Americans don't get enough magnesium in their diets.

When your body is magnesium deficient, you could be playing with fire. Magnesium deficiency has been linked to chronic health concerns like osteoporosis, diabetes, and even heart disease. If you're feeling unusually weak or suffering from irregular muscle cramps, a vitamin IV session from Juventee could be the solution you need.

Magnesium

Just about every health food and drink in the stores boasts high levels of antioxidants. That's great, but what are they? Antioxidants are substances shown to slow or prevent cell damage from free radicals. Free radicals are unstable molecules linked to inflammation, disease, and forms of cancer. According to the National Library of Medicine, antioxidants also act as hydrogen and electron donors, as well as enzyme inhibitors.

Most humans get some types of antioxidants naturally through eating and drinking. However, IV vitamin therapy is a much more effective way to fight back against free radicals with antioxidants. When your body lacks antioxidants, free radical production increases, which causes oxidative stress - a harmful situation linked to arthritis, cancers, strokes, and Parkinson's disease.

Antioxidants

Thankfully, Juventee's IV vitamin therapy in Haworth, NJ contains antioxidants that may scavenge and reduce the free radicals affecting your health.

Some additional vitamins and nutrients found in most IV vitamin therapies include:

  • Calcium
  • Amino Acids
  • Threonine
  • Arginine
  • Tryptophan
  • Vitamin E
  • Vitamin D
  • More

Treat Your Body Right with IV Vitamin Therapy from Juventee

If your goal is to nourish your body with nutrients and vitamins, Juventee's IV vitamin therapy in cityname, state is the key you need to unlock success. We believe that balance is key to your health and wellness, which is why our specialists employ the most innovative medical advances in our treatment options and products. Unlike other vitamin IV clinics, our focus is on providing you with a full range of health services to help you reach your full potential.

That way, you can satisfy your aesthetic, physical, and nutritional needs while positively impacting your emotional wellbeing too. If you're on the fence about getting healthy and re-discovering the joys of youth, contact our office today. It would be our pleasure to talk about your concerns and how our preventative, proactive treatments like IV vitamin therapy can help on your journey to health.

IV Vitamin Therapy Haworth, NJ

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Guzzo’s BakeHouse Brings Baked Goods & More to Haworth

reakfast, brunch, lunch, and baked goods are the stars of the show at Guzzo’s BakeHouse in Haworth. The eatery offers both dine-in and grab-and-go options that include sandwiches, treats, and more. The entire menu offers made from scratch items, giving each meal a homemade taste.Owner Giuliana Guzzo says the 1,700-square foot spot has a...

reakfast, brunch, lunch, and baked goods are the stars of the show at Guzzo’s BakeHouse in Haworth. The eatery offers both dine-in and grab-and-go options that include sandwiches, treats, and more. The entire menu offers made from scratch items, giving each meal a homemade taste.

Owner Giuliana Guzzo says the 1,700-square foot spot has a “somewhat retro style” and atmosphere. (Giuliana co-owns Guzzo’s BakeHouse with her husband, Ralph.) For instance, they play Frank Sinatra along with episodes of I Love Lucy and The Honeymooners throughout the day. “We’re huge fans of both shows,” Giuliana says. “In addition, in a world with so much sadness, we would like people to laugh.”

More from Best of NJ

Sandwiches are a popular item at Guzzo’s BakeHouse, and come in a variety of options. In particular, popular sandwiches include The Haworth, The BakeHouse, and the Besonhurst Brooklyn. The Haworth comes with either grilled chicken or a fried chicken cutlet, guacamole, bacon, and mozzarella on semolina bread. Likewise, The BakeHouse includes turkey, tomatoes, avocado, bacon, lettuce, and chipotle mayo on a semolina hero. Both sandwiches include fries. Finally, the Bensonhurst Brooklyn panini boasts grilled/fried chicken, peppers, prosciutto, mozzarella, and arugula, with a balsamic glaze.

Meanwhile, top-selling bakery items at Guzzo’s BakeHouse include donuts, lobster tails, croissants, and scones. However, they’re most famous for the cragel, a cross between a croissant and a bagel. Their seven-layer donut and other layered treats like crumb cake and cupcakes are also standouts on the menu. Click here to see their menu.

As for Giuliana, her personal menu favorites are the cannoli pancakes and egg white frittata. The former features layered homemade cannoli cream topped with crushed cannoli shells and sprinkled with powdered sugar; while the latter offers three egg whites, spinach, tomatoes, and feta, served with avocados and a house salad.

Ralph has been in the bakery business for over 30 years. In fact, he and Giuliana previously owned Belli Baci Bakery on Staten Island and Delizioso Bakery + Kitchen in Princeton. Of course, Guzzo’s BakeHouse includes the bestsellers from both on the menu. Furthermore, Ralph comes from a family of bakers, as his grandfather opened a bakery in Brooklyn after emigrating from Italy. After that, his father also opened a bakery in Sunset Park (Brooklyn). Giuliana has a background in event marketing, including handling celebrity events for Macy’s Inc. Her specific industry experience comes from working in bakeries as a kid.

Visit Guzzo’s BakeHouse at 149 Terrace Street in Haworth. (Click here to see them on Google Maps.) To learn more: Click here to visit their website | Follow them on Instagram | Click to give them a call.

See the Latest Restaurants Open in New Jersey.

Top and Bottom Photos: © Vinny Parisi / Best of NJMiddle Photo: Guzzo’s BakeHouse

Brooke and Teri Shields: A mother & child reunion

readsA.JPG"I think growing up in Newark was one of the biggest shaping factors for my mother," says Brooke Shields, who, in her book, "There Was a Little Girl: The Real Story of My Mother and Me" writes about how Teri Shields' New Jersey roots affected their lives.By Gerry Strauss | For INSIDE JERSEY magazineTERI SHIELDSgrew up without much, like so many of her neighbors who lived in Newark’s Ironbound section (then known exclusively as Down Neck)....

readsA.JPG

"I think growing up in Newark was one of the biggest shaping factors for my mother," says Brooke Shields, who, in her book, "There Was a Little Girl: The Real Story of My Mother and Me" writes about how Teri Shields' New Jersey roots affected their lives.

By Gerry Strauss | For INSIDE JERSEY magazine

TERI SHIELDS

grew up without much, like so many of her neighbors who lived in Newark’s Ironbound section (then known exclusively as Down Neck).

The daughter of Theresa (a house cleaner) and John Schmon (a bus driver), Theresa Anna Lillian Schmon had big dreams. But she could never have imagined the dizzying highs and tragic lows that would ultimately unfold during her lifetime.

After marrying high-class Revlon bigwig Francis Alexander Shields in 1964, Teri gave birth to Brooke Christa Shields in 1965 and the rest is, well, showbiz history.

Teri and Francis divorced shortly after Brooke was born, and Teri rededicated her life to supporting her daughter’s modeling and acting careers.

Brooke Shields would spend the next 40-plus years in the public eye, appearing on hundreds of magazine covers, starring in television shows and films, seducing the world with her effortless blend of beauty and sophistication. All, or at least most of the time, with her mother by her side.

In her new book, “There Was a Little Girl: The Real Story of My Mother and Me” (Dutton Adult, 416 pp., $26.95), Brooke Shields presents an honest-yet-adoring look at her relationship with Teri Shields, and how her mom’s New Jersey roots affected their lives — both good and bad.

“I think growing up in Newark was one of the biggest shaping factors for my mother,” Shields says. “She wore it like a badge. If you’re from Newark and you’re from the Ironbound section, you’re tough. There’s this fighter mentality, this street-smart essence.”

Despite Teri’s hometown pride, she also suffered from insecurity about her upbringing, especially when Brooke’s career took them into the upper echelon of society.

“There was a sophistication that she coveted that was represented by Manhattan and by a certain societal level that she never felt worthy of because of her Newark roots,” Shields recalls. “She grappled with this paradoxical relationship with it, because she was proud and it made her tough, but it also made her seem like she was not educated or that she was not sophisticated or she wasn’t chic. She didn’t grow up in an affluent way, and yet she then found herself in those communities and surrounded by that, and so she could use Newark as shock value, but she also secretly thought, ‘Oh, they’re talking about me when I’m walking away.’ ”

Teri moved with Brooke to Haworth, Bergen County, following her divorce. From the get-go, Brooke’s early life was far from that of a typical Jersey kid (she had her first modeling gig before her first birthday), and her mother worked hard to balance Brooke’s ever-growing show biz career with a taste of traditional Garden State life.

“I’ve looked at it as just having more of everything,” Shields says. “I did have my regular life with my school friends. And then after school, work would just take my mother and I to these amazing adventures. It’s really hard to look at that as a sacrifice, because we managed to burn the candle at both ends forever.”

Brooke's roller-coaster ride to stardom was put on hold in 1983 when she decided to step away from the spotlight to attend Princeton University. "My family just had this unspoken assumption that we would all go to college," she says. "That's what you do. If you have the opportunity to go, you go. It was something that was just always on the table and it was never an option not to."

Beyond family expectations, Shields embraced the opportunity for a sense of normalcy with open arms.

“By the time that college came around, I had a full-blown career,” she says. “It was really easy to leave it, because the career was exhausting. Even if I was told, ‘You’re going to have to start over when you graduate in your career,’ I would have still gone, because those four years were the first that were purely mine. College gave me a life.”

While other celebrities have been known to request special treatment during their educational pursuits, Shields wanted the full college experience, which included living on campus.

“I jumped in so wholeheartedly,” she says. “I tried out for singing groups and dancing groups, and I joined the theater club and I studied in the library all day long, and I joined an eating club. I embraced my college experience more than some of my friends did, because some of my friends were, in a weird way, rushing through it. They wanted to be doing stuff that didn’t have anything to do with the school, and I wanted to be nowhere else.”

Brooke’s relationship with her mother waned in 1995 when the actress broke managerial ties, a decision sparked by disagreements over the handling of Brooke’s career and finances, as well as Teri’s ongoing battle with alcoholism. Despite the rift, Brooke never completely detached from her mother, remaining supportive of Teri’s attempts to defeat her demons.

Since her mother’s death at age 79 in 2012, after a long illness associated with dementia, Shields says she has come to appreciate her mom, and where she came from, even more. She sees her new book as her chance to tell that story — for better or worse — in her own words.

“I wrote this book for my children,” she says. “I felt like so much had been written about my mother, and I thought, ‘You know what? It’s my turn.’ Whether people agree with it or don’t agree with it, like it or don’t like it, I want this opportunity to tell our story.”

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Appletree Preschool’s Newest Location Opening in Haworth, NJ! [dedicated]

Believe it or not, it’s already time to start thinking about the 2021-2022 school year (no, we’re not trying to rush through spring and summer!). If you have a preschooler at home, finding the right school to set the foundation of your child’s education is an important decision. Appletree Preschool’s educational excellence is expanding to a fourth location in Haworth – its current locations are in River Edge, Westwood and North Haledon. The Haworth location will open its doors in late spring/early summer and wil...

Believe it or not, it’s already time to start thinking about the 2021-2022 school year (no, we’re not trying to rush through spring and summer!). If you have a preschooler at home, finding the right school to set the foundation of your child’s education is an important decision. Appletree Preschool’s educational excellence is expanding to a fourth location in Haworth – its current locations are in River Edge, Westwood and North Haledon. The Haworth location will open its doors in late spring/early summer and will welcome your family to experience quality care and a holistic curriculum in a loving and nurturing environment.

When deciding on a preschool, your child’s comfort, security and safety comes first, which is why all their staff are CPR and First Aid certified. Appletree Preschool’s mission is to build a high-quality care environment based on trust, while focusing on a top-notch curriculum that lays the groundwork for your child’s learning, growth and development for years to come. Their motto “Putting Our Children First” reflects their core values that nothing is more rewarding than having a hand in helping young children, starting from their first milestone to supporting a successful transition to Kindergarten.

Appletree Preschool offers programs for Infants through Pre-K, ensuring that your little one enters elementary school with the confidence to succeed. Even at the earliest age, their Infant Explorers Program introduces alphabet and number songs, multi-sensory activities and plenty of age-appropriate play. The Toddler Adventurers Program is designed to support children’s language and sensory development, reaching milestones and learning routines. In the Pre-K 2 Discoverers and Pre-K 3 Navigators Programs, students further their fine and gross motor, practical life, reading, recognition, and writing skills through creative activities and thoughtfully prepared lesson plans. The Pre-K 4 Voyagers Program provides social, emotional and cognitive skill development as they begin their path to Kindergarten.

To achieve this successful transition, Appletree Preschool offers a fun and well-rounded educational experience, including its curriculum with extracurricular activities such as athletics, arts education, in-school events, cooking and more. This all-encompassing approach provides great Kindergarten readiness for all of Appletree Preschool’s little graduates.

And BONUS! Not only does Appletree Preschool offer year-round care for infants through Pre-K, but they also offer an educational and fun-filled summer camp for kids in Kindergarten through 3rd grade. This year’s weekly themes include Bubblemania, LEGO Camp, Mad Scientists, Space Adventure, and many more! Combined with special activities from arts and crafts to sports, the camp provides the opportunity for an engaging, active and educational summer with friends.

To learn more about Appletree Preschool’s new Haworth location or any of its schools and camp programs, schedule a tour today.

276 Haworth Ave., Haworth (coming soon!)

[email protected]

620 Kinderkamack Rd., River Edge

201-576-9600, [email protected]

24 Booker St., Westwood

201-383-0836, [email protected]

885 Belmont Ave., North Haledon

973-310-3875, [email protected]

HAWORTH COUNTRY CLUB CAPTURES 2022 NATIONAL CAR RENTAL PGA JR. LEAGUE NEW JERSEY SECTION CHAMPIONSHIP PRESENTED BY RWJBARNABAS HEALTH

13 and Under Team Captures Title at Clearbrook Golf Course and Advances to the 2022 National Car Rental PGA Jr. League Regional Championship at Kingsmill Resort (Williamsburg, Va.)Bedminster, N.J. The New Jersey Golf Foundation (NJGF), the charitable arm of the New Jersey Section, PGA of America (NJPGA) hosted the 2022 National Car Rental PGA Jr. League New Jersey Section Championship presented by RWJBarnabas Health on Thursday, August 11th at Clearbrook Golf Course in Monroe Township. More than 150 kids represen...

13 and Under Team Captures Title at Clearbrook Golf Course and Advances to the 2022 National Car Rental PGA Jr. League Regional Championship at Kingsmill Resort (Williamsburg, Va.)

Bedminster, N.J. The New Jersey Golf Foundation (NJGF), the charitable arm of the New Jersey Section, PGA of America (NJPGA) hosted the 2022 National Car Rental PGA Jr. League New Jersey Section Championship presented by RWJBarnabas Health on Thursday, August 11th at Clearbrook Golf Course in Monroe Township. More than 150 kids representing teams throughout the state competed for the opportunity to advance to the 2022 National Car Rental PGA Jr. League Regional Championship at Kingsmill Resort (Williamsburg, Va.) – Sept. 2-4, 2022.

Led by PGA Professional and Team Captain, Mark Thornewell, Haworth Country Club (Haworth, NJ) captured both the 13-and-under Division and the 17-and-under Division. The 13-and-under team, which includes Olivia Lee; Aiden So; Justin Peck; CJ Antifonario; Roger Rice; Jason Mack; Aaron Koo and Savannah Lavert, earned a spot in the

Region 3 Championship at Kingsmill Resort. The 17-and-under Championship team consisted of Lucas Hofmeister, John Souva, Padraig Leahy, Isabella Crespo, Inha Jun and Aubrey Lee.

Through PGA Jr. League, kids have a unique opportunity to stay active, while learning and enjoying the game of golf in a fun and social environment on co-ed teams alongside their friends, wearing numbered jerseys – under the direction of PGA and LPGA Professionals. Following recreational play in the spring and summer, hundreds of 13U All-Star teams (boys and girls ages 10-13) and 17U All-Star teams (boys and girls ages 14-17), are formed in each league to compete in the National Car Rental PGA Jr. League Championship Season.

“The New Jersey Golf Foundation delivers programming that aligns with our mission of supporting community-based initiatives that keep kids active, and builds healthier communities,” said Justin Edelman, Senior Vice President Corporate Partnerships, RWJBarnabas Health. “The opportunity for kids to compete in a team format golf event while playing alongside friends is a great alternative to individual stroke play tournaments, and we are thrilled to support the growth of PGA Jr. League in New Jersey.”

More than 1,200 boys and girls (13-and-under) participated in New Jersey PGA Jr. League presented by RWJBarnabas Health this season, while competing on 80+ teams representing public facilities, municipal courses, private clubs and First Tee chapters. To complement the under 13 age group, The NJGF hosts a league for 17-and-under boys and girls, with 100 kids participating.

The NJGF was created in 2004 to positively impact lives and communities through the game of golf, with a focus on 3 core pillars: youth, military, and special needs. Under the guidance of PGA Professionals, programming is designed to provide individuals from all backgrounds with an opportunity to experience the game of golf in a welcoming environment. Through a wide range of programming, the NJGF champions a commitment to Diversity, Equity & Inclusion (DE&I) with the goal of evolving the composition of the game of golf to better reflect the broad array of differences in our society at large.

For more information on the New Jersey Golf Foundation visit www.njgolffoundation.org.

About The New Jersey Golf Foundation

Founded in 2004, the New Jersey Golf Foundation is a 501(c)(3) and the charitable arm of the New Jersey Section, PGA of America. Through a wide range of programming, the NJGF champions a commitment to Diversity, Equity & Inclusion (DE&I) with the goal of evolving the composition of the game of golf to better reflect the broad array of differences in our society at large. With a focus on 3 core pillars (youth, military, special needs), the NJGF’s mission is to positively impact lives and communities through the game of golf. Led by PGA Professionals, the NJGF hosts a dynamic line-up of programming that provides access for individuals from all backgrounds to experience the game of golf in a welcoming environment. Signature programs include, Golf In Schools, which is run annually at more than 200 schools, impacting more than 120,000 boys and girls (K-8); PGA Jr. League featuring more than 80 teams and 1300 kids under the age of 13 throughout New Jersey; Special Olympics New Jersey Golf and programming for individuals living with intellectual and developmental disabilities and PGA HOPE, the flagship military program that introduces golf to Veterans with disabilities. For more information, visit www.njgolffoundation.org.

A 1950's From ‐fora 1950's Romance

This is a digitized version of an article from The Times’s print archive, before the start of online publication in 1996. To preserve these articles as they originally appeared, The Times does not alter, edit or update them.Occasionally the digitization process introduces transcription errors or other problems; we are continuing to work to improve these archived versions.HAWORTH, N.J. — Bob Kaplan, a 38-year-old salesman of corrugated paper materials, went to his senior prom the other night. It cost him $3,500, but ...

This is a digitized version of an article from The Times’s print archive, before the start of online publication in 1996. To preserve these articles as they originally appeared, The Times does not alter, edit or update them.

Occasionally the digitization process introduces transcription errors or other problems; we are continuing to work to improve these archived versions.

HAWORTH, N.J. — Bob Kaplan, a 38-year-old salesman of corrugated paper materials, went to his senior prom the other night. It cost him $3,500, but who counts pennies on prom night? Not Mr. Kaplan, a tall, boyish‐looking figure in a white dinner jacket from the 1950's. “No,” he said with a dreamy smile, “I'll have this memory for a long time.”

His wife, Cindy, 36, wore an orchidcolored gown of tulle, also from the 50's, and a matching wrist corsage. “I thought Bobby was going to get me a pin‐on, but instead he got me a wrist,” she said, laughing. She laughed so hard her ponytail shook.

All around them, in the Sacred Heart School gymnasium here, about 80 middle‐aged couples in thrift‐shop clothes were dancing the Lindy at the senior prom of the so‐called Class of ‘58. Now, as everyone in this Bergen County hamlet knows, there never was a Class of ‘58 or any other year in Haworth. Haworth (population 9,000) is too small to have a high school.

What happened was that those madcap Kaplans on Ivy Avenue invented the class four months ago while looking for a “typically 50's” way to celebrate their 15th wedding anniversary. After all, theirs was a “typically 50's” romance:

He was a high school basketball star. She belonged to the “arty” crowd. They were counselors at Camp Silver Birch. “Cindy's kid brother was in my group,” he recalled, “and my cocounselor and I wanted a good tip from her parents so we flipped a coin to see who had to take her out. I lost. I mean, I went out with her.” He grinned. “I guess that was a 50's thing to do.”

Soon Bobby Kaplan and Cindy Gelbard were going steady. Then she wore his fraternity pin, then his engagement ring. They married, had babies and moved to the suburbs.

Divorce Was Prevalent

Given the odds, the Kaplans might be a divorce statistic today. “A lot of people who got married back then did get divorced,” he acknowledged. And there were times, she acknowledged, “when I was sure it would not last.”

The trouble was that Mrs. Kaplan is an actress of the Off Off Broadway variety, the type who shows up at her own surprise birthday party disguised as a librarian. She meant to have a career at a time when mothers just didn't do such things. The Kaplans fought about this.

“We were always fighting at first,” she said. “It was a Mexican standoff, a game of chicken. But I retained my identity. I never stopped working in the theater. There was no way I was going to stay home and do housework or care for kids.”

This meant hiring help. “I didn't mind working to pay for help and I never asked Bobby. to do things around the house, the way women do who want to possess men. I guess the key to our marriage is we both kept our independ‐ once at a time when it wasn't fashionable, when you were supposed to belong to each other.”

Not Many Changes

Over the years, the Kaplans haven't changed much. He still jokes about her “weird” theater friends and she sometimes nods when his tennis pals rehash their games. But Bobby Kaplan, who played high school basketball, is still married to the former Cindy Gelbard, class bohemian, and to celebrate the survival of their 50's romance they gave a 50's party for 175 friends.

Not one of those 50's parties where half the guests refuse to get dressed up and the other half has to go home early. Not one of those 50's parties that soon degenerates into a 70's party with everybody talking about. property taxes or President Carter or redoing the kitchen.

This was an authentic senior prom, mind you, with Lindy and cha‐cha contests to the sound of The Regents (’Baa-Baa-Baa-Baa-Baa-Bra-Ann”). A prom with a theme (“Summer Serenade”) and a color scheme (green and yellow), a prom climaxed by the coronation of a King and Queen. In keeping with the 50's spirit, the royal couple was chosen mostly on the basis of appearance and attire, although points were given for “personality.”

“As you leave high school behind,” finalists were asked, “what are your goals and aspirations?” Fingering her husband's old bar mitzvah ring, which hung from her neck on a ribbon, Ann Loeb murmured, “I hope some day to become a Stepford wife.” Clearly, she was the prom queen.

The prom king turned out to be Bob Posner, who wore Bermuda shorts, a bow tie and a white dinner jacket that almost hid his paunch. Asked to recall his “most memorable high school experience,” Mr. Posner looked earnestly into the eyes of the judges and replied, “When I found God.”

Living the Experience

It was no wonder that some promgoers were prepared to play the Class of ‘58. They had been living it for months, you see, at prom committee meetings in the Kaplan home. Not only did Mrs. Kaplan appoint herself chair‐ man of the prom committee, she also designated guests to play class officers, cheerleaders, even members of the school basketball, baseball and football teams. Invitations were sent via a school newspaper, which carried a gossip column about the Class of ‘58, entitled “Heard in the Halls.”

Everyone had an attack of nostalgia, it seems.

For a few children of the 50's, thumbing through old yearbooks and diaries was sobering. Linsey Levine, for example, found her diaries filled with turquoise ink and punctuation marks any’ boys’ names.

“Why, my whole life was boys,” she said, looking horrified. “I was absolutely mindless. I never would have looked at those diaries except for the prom. Then I showed them to friends in Chappaqua and they think I should publish them.”

Gail Spitalnik of Spring Valley, N.Y., remembered how it felt to be a wallflower. “My prom was in ‘58 and I didn't have a date so tonight I'm making up for it,” she said, breaking into a chacha.

But most 50's memories revolved around clothes. If nothing else the Class of ‘58 were “neat dressers.” Strapless gowns were big, in pastel shades of tulle. Shoes were high heeled and so pointed they curled at the toes. Everybody was happy to kick them off on the dance floor. Also uncomfortable were the regulation garter belt and the stiff bra, stuffed with Kleenex. Here. and there, lips were painted in Island Pink and Tatoo Orange lipstick.

The men dug up dinner jackets with narrow lapels, plaid cummerbunds with matching how ties and white bucks. One sported an “I like Ike” button and several squeezed into their old Army uniforms.

After the prom, about 30 fast types drove to the Idlewild Country Club, where they spread their blankets on the sand, passed the bottle and necked. There was moonlight swimming but no skinny dipping. Skinny dipping was not a 50's thing to do.

Then everybody had breakfast at the Kapl&ns'. As she put on the coffee, Cindy Kaplan smiled and said how nice it was “to be 18 again with a 35-year-old head.”

Wrist corsages and strapless gowns, left, were the thing to wear to the senior prom of the Class of ‘58. It was given by Bobby and Cindy Kaplan, right, a typically 50's couple in Haworth, N.J.

The New York Times/Larry Morris

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