Hormone Replacement Therapy Clinic in Fort Lee, NJ | Juventee Medical Spa

HRT -Hormone Replacement Therapy Clinic in Fort Lee, NJ.

Is HRT for Women the Right Answer?

To live a healthy life, hormone stability is very important for women. That's where the beauty of HRT treatments for women begins to shine because it balances hormones that would otherwise be altered due to menopause.

HRT treatments for women represent a revolutionary step toward living life without the pitfalls of old age. However, at Juventee, we understand that no two women, and by proxy, patients, are the same. That's why our team of doctors and specialists provide personalized treatment options for women, combining holistic treatment, nutrition, fitness plans, and more to supplement our HRT treatments.

Is HRT the answer if you feel exhausted, overweight, and moody? That's the million-dollar question that we're asked almost every day. And to be honest, it's hard to say without a comprehensive exam by an HRT expert at Juventee. What we can say is that when a woman's hormones are better balanced during menopause, she has a much better chance of enjoying life without the crippling symptoms that other women feel.

At Juventee, helping women reclaim their vitality and love of life is our top priority. While some HRT clinics see patients as nothing more than a means to make money, our team is cut from a different cloth.

A New Youthful You Awaits at Juventee

If you are considering HRT treatments for women in Fort Lee, NJ, you need a team of hormone replacement experts by your side. At Juventee, our knowledgeable HRT doctors are ready to help. Our team will answer your initial questions, conduct necessary testing, and craft a customized program designed to alleviate the challenges you're facing as a woman going through menopause.

With a healthy diet, exercise, positive life choices, and hormone replacement therapy, unveiling the new "you" is easier than you might think. Contact our office today to get started on your journey to optimal health and well-being.

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Latest News in Fort Lee, NJ

Hackensack Meridian Health’s New Primary Care Practice in Fort Lee, NJ, Expands Access to Expert, Multilingual Medical Care for Bergen County Residents

Newswise — Hackensack Meridian Health has opened a new primary care practice in Fort Lee, expanding access to expert, multilingual medical care for patients of all ages in Bergen County.Hackensack Meridian Medical Group’s new primary care practice is located at 301 Bridge Plaza North in Fort Lee and provides patients with routine medical services delivered in a welcoming environment. Services and conditions treated include:“Our physicians focus on building relationships with our patients so we can del...

Newswise — Hackensack Meridian Health has opened a new primary care practice in Fort Lee, expanding access to expert, multilingual medical care for patients of all ages in Bergen County.

Hackensack Meridian Medical Group’s new primary care practice is located at 301 Bridge Plaza North in Fort Lee and provides patients with routine medical services delivered in a welcoming environment. Services and conditions treated include:

“Our physicians focus on building relationships with our patients so we can deliver personalized, comprehensive care,” said Mark D. Sparta, FACHE, president and chief hospital executive, Hackensack University Medical Center and president, North Region, Hackensack Meridian Health. “Our physicians collaborate closely with each patient to help them manage a wide range of health needs, and we offer everything from routine check-ups to sick visits to ongoing care for chronic conditions.”

All physicians at HMH - Primary Care - Fort Lee are currently accepting new patients. Physicians include:

Situated along the Hudson River atop The Palisades, Fort Lee's population and housing density increased considerably during the 1960s and 1970s with the construction of many high rise apartment buildings. For the thousands of people living here, including one of the nation’s largest Korean-American communities, it is now easier than ever to obtain comprehensive screenings and care without crossing the bridge to Manhattan.

Recognizing the importance of connecting with non-English-speaking patients in a more meaningful way, and to help provide a more comfortable experience and a better quality of care by communicating in a way the patient can fully understand, all of the Fort Lee Primary Care Practice are multilingual. Dr. Shim, Dr. Sung and Dr. Lee are fluent in Korean. Dr. Fu is fluent in Chinese.

“Our goal is to enhance access to high-quality, convenient primary care services across Bergen County while making all residents feel comfortable and welcome at our practice,” said James Clark, M.D., president, Physician Enterprise Division, Hackensack Meridian Health.

ABOUT HACKENSACK MERIDIAN HEALTH

Hackensack Meridian Health is a leading not-for-profit health care organization that is the largest, most comprehensive and truly integrated health care network in New Jersey, offering a complete range of medical services, innovative research and life-enhancing care. The network has 18 hospitals and more than 500 patient care locations, which include ambulatory care centers, surgery centers, home health services, ambulance services, lifesaving air medical transportation, rehabilitation centers, urgent care centers, physician practice locations, and a fitness and wellness center. With more than 35,000 team members and 7,000 physicians, Hackensack Meridian Health is a distinguished leader in health care philanthropy and committed to the health and well-being of communities throughout New Jersey.

The network’s notable distinctions include having the only #1 ranked adult and children's hospitals in New Jersey, as ranked by U.S. News & World Report, 2023-24. Hackensack University Medical Center is nationally-ranked by U.S. News & World Report in six specialties. To learn more, visit www.hackensackmeridianhealth.org.

Strong winds knock down trees across Tri-State, cause partial wall collapse in Fort Lee

FORT LEE, New Jersey (WABC) -- Weather is causing destruction across the Tri-State as damaging wind has knocked down several trees and even caused damage to buildings.The strong wind gusts have kept utility crews and tree services very busy Monday, but fortunately no major injuries have been reported.A wind gust sent a tree crashing onto a car in Prospect Park, Brooklyn, and in Rockland County a tree topped onto a power line in Ramapo, forcing ground closures.There are also several reports out of New Jersey where the win...

FORT LEE, New Jersey (WABC) -- Weather is causing destruction across the Tri-State as damaging wind has knocked down several trees and even caused damage to buildings.

The strong wind gusts have kept utility crews and tree services very busy Monday, but fortunately no major injuries have been reported.

A wind gust sent a tree crashing onto a car in Prospect Park, Brooklyn, and in Rockland County a tree topped onto a power line in Ramapo, forcing ground closures.

There are also several reports out of New Jersey where the wind has caused trees to fall across the area.

In Hillsdale, a massive tree crashed through a home right into the kitchen.

Homeowner Michael Sokol said he was home at the time with his dog and initially didn't realize what had happened. The incident wiped out his bathroom, kitchen and deck.

"I've been concerned about those trees since we moved in, but nothing we can do about it,"Sokol said.

ALSO READ | Empty tractor-trailers and tandem trucks banned on 7 NYC bridges due to wind

And crews responded to the scene after high winds caused a wall to partially collapse at a building under construction on Main Street in Fort Lee around 11 a.m.

Officials say the strong winds took out the top section of a hollow, block wall and part of it fell on the building next door, which caused damage to the roof.

Debris also fell onto the sidewalk. No injuries were reported but there is property damage left behind.

And in Livingston a tree fell across Sterling Drive around 9 a.m., missing the homes on both sides of the street.

"We got a report of a tree down with wires, taking wires down and on fire, when we arrived on scene, the tree was across the roadway," said Chief Christopher Mullin with the Livingston Fire Department.

Another tree was found down on the JFK Parkway near the Short Hills Mall.

Meanwhile in Hoboken, a 33-year-old from Jersey City was struck in the back when an awning fell off a vacant storefront at 200 Washington St. The woman was taken to the hospital with complaints of lower back pain.

RELATED | Passaic River expected to crest as heavy rain triggers flooding concerns

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Fort Lee mayor sues over congestion pricing, claims program will cause more asthma in NJ

NewsWe rely on your support to make local news available to allMake your contribution now and help Gothamist thrive in 2024. Donate today Gothamist is funded by sponsors and member donationsThe mayor of Fort Lee, New Jersey filed a federal lawsuit on Wednesday that aims to stop the MTA&...

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Make your contribution now and help Gothamist thrive in 2024. Donate today

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The mayor of Fort Lee, New Jersey filed a federal lawsuit on Wednesday that aims to stop the MTA’s congestion pricing program, claiming the tolls planned for Manhattan would increase air pollution in the Garden State.

Fort Lee Mayor Mark Sokolich said the program — which aims to charge drivers who enter Manhattan south of 60th Street — will lead to more drivers entering via the George Washington Bridge in order to avoid the fees. The lawsuit argues that the potential bump in traffic on the New Jersey side of the bridge will cause more air pollution, harming people in the area with respiratory diseases like asthma.

The legal challenge was filed against the Federal Highway Administration, the MTA and the MTA panel tasked with setting the price of the tolls. Sokolich also included Fort Lee resident Richard Galler, who said he has asthma, as a co-plaintiff, and aims to find more people in the area with respiratory issues to join the lawsuit.

Sokolich told Gothamist his town, which sits at the foot of the George Washington Bridge, can’t handle any more cars coming to or from the Hudson River crossing.

“Our cup is completely full — not another drip of traffic could we possibly absorb,” said Sokolich. “We can’t even handle an additional 1%. As it is, our emergency first responders are jogging to calls during traffic gridlock.”

“We’re being ignored, we’re being disregarded, we derive no benefit from this," he said. "It’s just simply not fair.”

The lawsuit calls for a New Jersey federal judge to halt the congestion pricing program, which the MTA plans to launch in the spring. And if a judge does not stop the tolls, the lawsuit demands that New York establish a monitoring program to “evaluate and treat respiratory distress and asthma resulting” from the program.

The suit also calls for New York to set up a fund to “help defray the increased costs to drivers who are forced to pay the increased cost of going through the Holland or Lincoln tunnels.”

The MTA’s environmental assessment on congestion pricing released last year found that traffic could in fact increase on the George Washington Bridge as a result of congestion pricing.

But MTA spokesperson John McCarthy said the program will create cleaner air because the tolls will discourage many drivers from entering Manhattan’s central business district. That's the goal of the program, along with funding $15 billion in upgrades to New York's mass transit infrastructure.

“News flash: Manhattan is already full of vehicles and we don’t need more carbon emissions,” McCarthy said in a statement. “So congestion pricing needs to move forward for less traffic, safer streets, cleaner air and huge improvements to mass transit.”

It’s the second time an elected official in New Jersey has filed a federal lawsuit over congestion pricing. Gov. Phil Murphy filed a separate suit in July against the Federal Highway Administration, arguing the agency gave a “rubber stamp” to the tolls.

Later this month, the MTA’s panel is expected to recommend the cost of the congestion pricing tolls — which could range from $9 to $23 on weekdays. The MTA board will then need to approve the pricing structure and build out the new tolling equipment before the agency launches the program next year.

Our teacher groped us and N.J. district did nothing, ex-students allege in lawsuit

Two former students are suing Fort Lee Public Schools, alleging the district failed to protect them from being sexually harassed and groped by a middle school teacher.The lawsuit filed Wednesday against the district and its school board claims Howard B. Sidorsky, then a special education math teacher at Lewis F. Cole Middle School, groped and made inappropriate comments to one student in 2012 and another in 2017.One student wa...

Two former students are suing Fort Lee Public Schools, alleging the district failed to protect them from being sexually harassed and groped by a middle school teacher.

The lawsuit filed Wednesday against the district and its school board claims Howard B. Sidorsky, then a special education math teacher at Lewis F. Cole Middle School, groped and made inappropriate comments to one student in 2012 and another in 2017.

One student was in seventh grade and the other was in eighth grade when they were sexually harassed by the teacher, the lawsuit alleges.

The Bergen County school district, which serves about 4,000 students in grades pre-K-12, failed to report the misconduct to child welfare authorities and law enforcement, despite complaints made by the students’ parents, the suit says.

The Fort Lee School District “failed to protect these children,” said attorney Jeffrey Fritz, who is representing the former students. “So, this lawsuit is being filed for these young ladies’ justice, but also to ensure the safety of students within the Fort Lee School District and throughout New Jersey.”

Sidorsky — who was found guilty of harassment in municipal court in 2018 after one of the student’s parents filed a complaint — did not immediately respond to a request to comment on the lawsuit. He is not being sued by the two women.

Fort Lee Superintendent Robert Kravitz said the district could not comment on pending litigation.

“The Fort Lee School District has a long tradition of academic success for all of our students by offering a positive learning environment for everyone,” Kravitz said in a statement. “We are unable to comment on any pending or potential litigation.”

Kristen Richter, Fort Lee’s school board president, did not respond to a request to comment.

After a municipal court found Sidorsky guilty of harassment in 2018, the teacher filed an appeal in state court, according to court records. The state court upheld the guilty verdict in 2019.

He then appealed to the state Superior Court’s Appellate Division in 2020, where a panel of three judges said “there is no reason to disturb defendant’s conviction for harassment,” according to a copy of the opinion.

The student in that case, Kaylie Quezada, identified herself publicly Wednesday for the first time during a press conference in Fort Lee announcing the lawsuit against Fort Lee schools.

She was 13 years old when Sidorsky “started behaving inappropriately around me during class and around me outside of class, which made me uncomfortable,” Quezada, now 19, said.

The lawsuit alleges Sidorsky would “grossly and offensively rub, touch, caress and massage” Quezada’s shoulders, back, waist, upper breast and chest area in class and around the middle school between September and December 2017, according to the lawsuit.

Quezada said she reported Sidorsky‘s behavior to her school guidance counselor and principal, but was told “to just go back to class and not speak about this with anyone else.”

“After I spoke up, I felt invalidated and therefore ashamed,” Quezada said.

The other student, who was not identified in the lawsuit, alleges Sidorsky began making lewd and inappropriate sexual comments to her in 2012, according to the lawsuit.

Sidorsky told her she was “pretty” and made lewd remarks, the suit alleges. He would “rub, touch, caress, and grab the then 12-year-old’s body, shoulder, waist, neck, and ribs in class.”

The girl’s mother reported Sidorsky to middle school officials, the lawsuit alleges. But, Sidorsky remained a teacher at the school.

The lawsuit also claims two additional students also came forward to the school administration in 2012 with complaints about Sidorsky’s inappropriate behavior.

Sidorsky was placed on paid leave by the district in 2018. He had his teaching certification revoked by the State Board of Examiners in 2020. He was approved in 2020 by the Public Employees’ Retirement System Board to receive a deferred retirement effective Feb. 1, 2023.

Both of the women suing said they suffer from anxiety, depression and continued emotional distress as a result of the sexual abuse they experienced.

“I want the school to follow proper procedures and policies in order to ensure that students are protected. I also want students to feel comfortable to speak up and just know that you’re not alone, and that you will be heard and that you have a support system,” Quezada said.

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Bergen officials sue to block NYC congestion pricing, calling it 'cancer-causing' tax

FORT LEE — With the loud, bustling George Washington Bridge as a backdrop, elected officials from many levels in Bergen County announced a new lawsuit this week in yet another attempt to undo New York's controversial congestion pricing plan.Fort Lee Mayor Mark Sokolich and Richard Galler, a borough resid...

FORT LEE — With the loud, bustling George Washington Bridge as a backdrop, elected officials from many levels in Bergen County announced a new lawsuit this week in yet another attempt to undo New York's controversial congestion pricing plan.

Fort Lee Mayor Mark Sokolich and Richard Galler, a borough resident with asthma, said in court documents that their health could become impaired from increased traffic on the George Washington Bridge and that they will be inconvenienced by the rerouting because of the congestion pricing tolls planned for Manhattan below 60th Street.

They are seeking a judicially mandated review of the federal approval process used to greenlight the program, as well as the creation of a fund to remediate traffic, noise, air pollution, stress on New Jersey's mass transit infrastructure, and the "deleterious health impact" on residents living near the George Washington Bridge and feeder roads, according to the class-action suit, filed in U.S. District Court in New Jersey on Wednesday.

The plaintiffs cite remediation actions the Metropolitan Transportation Authority is planning in the Bronx, a community that could see more traffic because of congestion pricing, while none are planned in New Jersey.

Those actions include spending at least $130 million to help electrify diesel-powered refrigeration trucks that go to the Hunts Point Market, expanding the clean trucks voucher program, improving community parks, installing air filtration systems at schools near highways, and creating an asthma treatment program.

Sokolich announced the lawsuit's filing at a press conference held at Fort Lee Historic Park, accompanied by U.S. Rep. Josh Gottheimer, who has led the charge against New York's tolling program; Bruce Nagel, the lawyer representing Sokolich and Galler; and other local elected officials who are fighting congestion pricing.

"To absorb that additional traffic is going to all but destroy the quality of lives we've managed to accumulate here in Fort Lee," Sokolich said. "With that comes pollutants, filth, dirt, atmosphere — it impacts everybody in my borough, and it impacts everybody in the region."

More:These North Jersey drivers are the ones most concerned about NY's congestion pricing plan

Murphy sued the Federal Highway Administration

The lawsuit is the second in three months to come from New Jersey to try to put a stop to the tolling program, which could go into effect as early as next spring.

Gov. Phil Murphy sued the Federal Highway Administration in July, accusing it of failing to require a more thorough environmental review of the program.

The Metropolitan Transportation Authority — which will oversee the tolling program, designed to reduce congestion in Manhattan, improve the city's air quality and raise money for the MTA's public transportation capital program — asked to join the lawsuit as a defendant last month to ensure that its interests are adequately represented.

'Cancer-causing congestion tax'

Among the outcomes the plaintiffs are seeking in the lawsuit filed Wednesday is for New York "to provide health care for all of the families in New Jersey who develop breathing and other health issues from their cancer-causing congestion tax," Gottheimer said. "They've already admitted that it's going to cause asthma for the children — that's why they're giving all this money to the Bronx. Not a penny for Jersey."

The Traffic Mobility Review Board — named as a defendant in the suit filed Wednesday, along with the MTA, the U.S. Department of Transportation, the Federal Highway Administration and several officials associated with those groups — is tasked with determining what the cost of the tolls will be and how credits or exemptions will work. The board has not yet made a final recommendation on the congestion pricing tolling plan.

“It’s Gottheimer Groundhog Day and — shocker — he wants to send more traffic and more pollution to New York," said John McCarthy, the MTA's chief of policy and external relations. "News flash: Manhattan is already full of vehicles, and we don’t need more carbon emissions. So congestion pricing needs to move forward for less traffic, safer streets, cleaner air and huge improvements to mass transit."

The current outline of the tolling proposal would charge drivers a fee — ranging from $9 to $23 — at the Manhattan entry points below 60th Street, excluding the George Washington Bridge. That's why the new lawsuit alleges that more drivers could choose to use the bridge to avoid the charge. The Lincoln and Holland tunnels could be subject to credits for tolls that people already pay to use those crossings.

The MTA's environmental report predicts that the number of vehicles that pass through Bergen County could increase 0.88% after the program's implementation, which could increase pollutants between 0.40% and 0.82%.

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