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Ridgefield Park Boys Basketball

2022-2023 Game Log Date Opponent Result 2PT 3PT FTM FTA PTS REB AST BLK STL GP 12/15/2022 @ Ramsey L 21-36 — — 3 4 3 2 — — — ...

2022-2023 Game Log

Date Opponent Result 2PT 3PT FTM FTA PTS REB AST BLK STL GP
12/15/2022 @ Ramsey L 21-36 3 4 3 2 1
12/17/2022 vs. Indian Hills L 38-57 5 1 13 5 1 1
12/20/2022 vs. Bergenfield L 45-48 2 1 5 1 1
12/22/2022 @ Mahwah W 47-39 3 2 3 8 9 1 1
12/27/2022 vs. Hoboken L 36-56 1 1 2 3 7 1 1
12/30/2022 @ Dickinson L 46-47 2 2 2 6 7 1
01/03/2023 @ Dwight-Morrow L 59-68 4 5 8 13 10 1
01/05/2023 vs. Fort Lee L 25-45 5 1
01/07/2023 @ Paramus L 39-53 2 1 3 6 10 10 1 1
01/10/2023 @ Dumont L 22-46 6 1
01/12/2023 vs. Cliffside Park W 42-41 2 8 1
01/14/2023 vs. New Milford L 51-52 2 2 2 5 1
01/16/2023 @ Saddle Brook W 68-42 5 1 1
01/19/2023 vs. River Dell L 32-48 2 4 5 1
01/21/2023 vs. Leonia L 48-54 3 6 5 1 1
01/23/2023 @ Palisades Park W 53-28 2 4 7 3 1
01/24/2023 vs. Dwight-Morrow L 36-52 1 6 9 8 12 1
01/28/2023 @ Emerson Boro L 43-55 2 2 2 6 10 1
01/31/2023 @ Fort Lee L 23-56 1 2 3 1
02/02/2023 vs. Dumont L 22-47 2 4 3 1
02/04/2023 vs. Bogota L 54-55 3 1 7 10 1
02/07/2023 @ Cliffside Park L 33-49 3 1 9 6 1
02/08/2023 @ Brearley L 52-55 7 1 1 18 15 1
02/11/2023 vs. Midland Park W 53-47 4 2 2 10 13 1
02/14/2023 @ Westwood L 43-51 6 12 10 1 1
02/16/2023 vs. Bergen Tech L 38-45 1 2 3 1 1
Season Totals: 56 4 30 43 150 186 12 26

NJ Mexican restaurant serves up dress code — despite its modest location

It’s their way or the highway.A Mexican restaurant in New Jersey is serving up an ultra strict dress code — despite the fact that it’s on a truck route next door to a QuickChek convenience store.Cantina 46 — off of Route 46 highway in Ridgefield –has a laundry list of fashion faux pas including: no plain white t-shirts, men’s tank tops/sleeve...

It’s their way or the highway.

A Mexican restaurant in New Jersey is serving up an ultra strict dress code — despite the fact that it’s on a truck route next door to a QuickChek convenience store.

Cantina 46 — off of Route 46 highway in Ridgefield –has a laundry list of fashion faux pas including: no plain white t-shirts, men’s tank tops/sleeveless shirts, beach attire, sweatsuit/athletic attire, excessively baggy clothing, flip-flops or slippers, work boots or inappropriate headwear.

“We don’t want to be like a regular restaurant, we want to be high end,” partner and manager Joaquin Molina told The Post.

The clothing regulations — which are posted on its website and a sign on the front door — start with “no plain white tees.”

“I don’t know why, but a lot of people think that having a white shirt is being part of a gang,” said Rafael Anaya, hospitality consultant behind the group Anaya, which works with Cantina 46.

Baggy clothing — especially on men — simply doesn’t work alongside bites of the joint’s $138 Tomahawk steak.

“It doesn’t look nice, that you got your pants all the way down here, showing your underwear, while you got a family here eating with kids,” said Molina, 33, a native of the Dominican Republic.

Underneath the dress code, in all capital letters, it states, “We reserve the right to refuse admission.”

That’s what happened on a recent weekday night, when a man with a backwards hat and a woman wearing flip flops strolled in for a bite.

“I said, ‘We have a dress code. I’m sorry,'” said hostess Richely Patricio. “They said, ‘OK, next time.'”

Cantina 46, which opened on April 28, posted the dress code on its Instagram page — and some were taken aback by the stringent policy.

“Look at this one, ‘No flip flops?! No manches.’ ‘No manches’ in Mexico means like, ‘What’s wrong with you, man?'” Anaya, who hails from Colombia, explained.

Others thought the rules were more appropriate for Central Park West — as opposed to Ridgefield Park.

“Are you located in NYC or truck route 46 in Ridgefield Park?” @kadensmommy14 wondered.

“Not a smart business move to turn off potential clients before you even have a customer base,” user @bernoutgsx1 said.

But customers chowing down at the restaurant approved.

“I think it’s a good thing cause a lot of places don’t have a dress code,” said Cassidy Solis. “There’s plenty of other places to eat if you want to chill down with flip flops.”

Another guest cheered the high-end makeover.

“It’s an old diner that was turned into Chinese food that I never came to for a million years,” said Jamie Rodriguez. “It still looks like a diner, so they’re trying to stand out.”

What do you think? Post a comment.

Meanwhile, spurned customers have returned — but this time dressed to impress, Molina noted.

“They call a manager and say, ‘I was sent away,’ but now I am [dressed correctly],'” he said.

“When they do that, we send them a free drink.”

A 77-foot-tall tree in Ridgefield is one of the largest Norway maples in the nation, expert says

This is a carousel. Use Next and Previous buttons to navigateRIDGEFIELD — A Norway Maple tree is considered one of the largest in the nation — and local officials want to protect it as much as possible.A Norway maple located behind the Ridgefield Guild of Artists on Halpin Lane was designated the state champion last year, and is believed to be one of the biggest trees in the country, behind a Norway Maple in New Jersey.Trees are measured using a point system that accounts for a combination of height, trunk ci...

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RIDGEFIELD — A Norway Maple tree is considered one of the largest in the nation — and local officials want to protect it as much as possible.

A Norway maple located behind the Ridgefield Guild of Artists on Halpin Lane was designated the state champion last year, and is believed to be one of the biggest trees in the country, behind a Norway Maple in New Jersey.

Trees are measured using a point system that accounts for a combination of height, trunk circumference and branch spread, said Frank Kaputa, an official state tree measurer.

Ridgefield's Norway maple was measured at 291 points — it's 77 feet tall, with a trunk circumference of 190 inches and an average branch spread of 96 feet.

Previously, a tree in Suffield was state champion and a tree in Montana was national champion. Suffield's tree is measured at 287 points, while the Montana tree is 288 points.

The Suffield tree, which was previously the state champion at 303 points, dropped in points to 287, due to "decline," Kaputa said.

"I went down (to Suffield) last year and I remeasured it," said Kaputa, a Glastonbury resident. Kaputa is the official measurer of the Connecticut Notable Trees Project. Kaputa said he has been involved with the measuring of trees for about 20 years. Kaputa estimates Ridgefield's Norway maple to be over 100 years old.

The Montana tree was listed on American Forests, the National Tree Registry, while the Suffield tree is listed on Connecticut Notable Trees Project, a state registry. American Forests has not kept records of champion trees since 2021, but the Ridgefield tree ranks higher than the trees listed in that year, Kaputa said.

Hearst Connecticut Media learned a Norway Maple in Stanhope, N.J. ranks larger than the Ridgefield tree. The New Jersey Norway Maple has 323 points, a circumference of 194 inches, a height of 103 feet, and a crown of 102 feet. It is ranked as state champion by the NJ Big & Heritage Tree Dept. of the New Jersey Forest Service within the Department of Environmental Protection.

Protecting the tree

The town said it will be protecting its champion Norway maple because cars park too close to the Norway maple.

Pound Ridge, N.Y. resident John Kelly, a tree enthusiast who spotted the Norway maple while viewing artwork at the Guild and then researched its size, said he's concerned cars are damaging the soil.

"Norway maples are shallow-rooted. Most of the roots are within 18 inches of the surface. So every time a car parks (near the maple), the car compacts the soil even further. The tree gets its water and its nutrients from that soil," he said, adding that there's gravel and broken pieces of asphalt in the soil by the tree.

Ridgefield First Selectman Rudy Marconi agreed.

"Technically, with any tree, you should not disturb the soil within the dripline," or the area directly located under the outer circumference of the tree branches, Marconi said. "Cars park right near the tree and what you don't want to do is disrupt the root structure."

While the town had planned to put in a new parking lot at Halpin Lane, which would help preserve the tree, it was ever done.

"That master plan was never implemented," Marconi said, due to lack of funds.

"We would still like to do it. We have applied for grants and we'll probably do so in the near future next year," he said.

Prior to paving, the town would install catch basins to collect water and lay down topsoil in the area to protect the tree, he said.

He said he still hopes to eventually pave the front of the Guild of Artists to the volunteer fire department building.

However, the town is preparing to rope the area off, put in curbs and plant grass.

"That will discontinue the travel area in close proximity to the tree," Marconi said.

The town will perform the work next month, when it is warmer, he said.

'A real honor'

It's a "real honor" for a town to have a champion tree, and the town should do everything in its means to protect it, Kaputa said.

"You can take pride in this," he said. "Whether it's in the woods or on their front lawn, people should really take a lot of pride in that."

Rigdgefield's Norway maple is "beautiful," Kaputa added.

"It's a full a tree with a big trunk and large branches spreading out," he said, "and it should be protected. You've got something special in town."

Correction: An original version of this article incorrectly reported the Ridgefield Norway Maple tree's national ranking. Ridgefield's Norway Maple ranks as the largest tree in Connecticut, but is smaller than a Norway Maple in Stanhope, N.J.

COUNTY, RIDGEFIELD PARK LAUNCH PARTNERSHIP TO RECYCLE EPS STYROFOAM

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:September 27, 2023Media Contact for the County of BergenContact: Derek [email protected]®Above: County Executive Jim Tedesco and Ridgefield Park Mayor John Anlian cutting a ribbon alongside County Commissioners Mary Amoroso and Tracy Zur, Ridgefield Park Commissioners Mark Olson, Wanda Portorreal William G. Gerken, Teane...

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:

September 27, 2023

Media Contact for the County of Bergen

Contact: Derek Sands

[email protected]

®

Above: County Executive Jim Tedesco and Ridgefield Park Mayor John Anlian cutting a ribbon alongside County Commissioners Mary Amoroso and Tracy Zur, Ridgefield Park Commissioners Mark Olson, Wanda Portorreal William G. Gerken, Teaneck Mayor Michael Pagan, Englewood Mayor Michael Wildes, and Sustainable Jersey Chairman Gary Sondermeyer

RIDGEFIELD PARK, NJ – Today, officials from the County of Bergen and Village of Ridgefield Park gathered to celebrate a new partnership to provide Bergen County municipalities with an efficient means of recycling EPS Styrofoam®.

One of the most widely used packing and insulation materials across the globe, Expanded Polystyrene (EPS) also known as Styrofoam®, takes over 500 years to decompose and while highly recyclable, the product is difficult to do so at the consumer level. That is why County and Village officials have worked together over the past year to put together an agreement to procure an EPS Densifying Machine to increase sustainability and recycling programs.

The agreement (Bergen County Commissioners Resolution 748-23), which was authorized on June 21, 2023, by the Bergen County Board of Commissioners, provides that the County of Bergen allocate $40,000 to the Village of Ridgefield Park to purchase and install an EPS Densifying Machine that would reside on Village property. Per the agreement, the Village of Ridgefield Park would make the EPS Densifier available to any Bergen County municipality seeking to collect and recycle EPS Styrofoam® by entering into a local shared service agreement. The densifier, which purchased by the Village in August from the Elmwood Park based company RecycleTech Corp., is now officially operational with the capacity to densify 200lbs of Expanded Polystyrene (EPS) per hour.

County Executive Jim Tedesco applauded the agreement stating how “this is a wonderful example of county and municipal government working together to achieve a common goal.”

Tedesco continued “Throughout my tenure as County Executive, we have strived to reach creative solutions through the expansion of shared services with our municipal partners, local boards of educations, and neighboring counties. “I thank all stakeholders for making today a reality and strongly encourage all municipalities to take advantage of this opportunity as we work towards building a more sustainable Bergen County.”

Village of Ridgefield Park Mayor John Anlian echoed County Executive Tedesco’s sentiment stating "New Jersey has 565 separate municipalities; and some might say that such a high number of separate governmental entities is an inefficient way of running things. But, when you have more people involved in our local governments, you have more people thinking about how to deal with and solve our problems. This project is a great example of where local people, with the financial help of county government, can achieve great results. We thank all involved for providing their ideas and enthusiasm for this project."

This initiative came to fruition as result of efforts from several stakeholders including County Commissioner Tracy Silna Zur, Ridgefield Park Village Commissioner Mark Olson, and the local organization Sustainable Jersey – Bergen Hub.

"The County of Bergen has already taken steps to reduce the amount of EPS Styrofoam® waste by banning its use in all county parks and facilities, but protecting our environment is a team effort. I am thrilled to see the hard work and collaboration between the County of Bergen, the Village of Ridgefield Park, and the Sustainable Jersey HUB come to fruition," said Bergen County Commissioner Tracy Zur. "This new EPS Densifier will serve as an important recycling tool while creating new opportunities for partnerships and shared services."

"It has been a great privilege to be a part of this project. Besides those from the county and Sustainable Jersey, many individuals from several municipalities within the Sustainable Jersey Bergen Hub have worked hard to make this day a reality,” said Mark Olson, Village of Ridgefield Park Commissioner. “Many times it was just one person making the difference. Over time that was many different people. Without all of them this day may never have happened."

“Sustainable Jersey is delighted to have helped the Bergen Hub launch its polystyrene education and collection program,” said Gary Sondermeyer, Chair of the Board of Trustees of Sustainable Jersey. “A sustainable future is all about partnerships and at this point 467 municipalities and 1,135 schools actively participate in Sustainable Jersey where we have awarded some $7.4 million in grants to advance local projects. Every step we take, like today’s dedication and Creative Bergen, are important to advance a future grounded in a shared ethic of sustainable living.”

This collaboration will aid municipalities already collecting EPS Styrofoam®, as well as those that want to begin collections, by dramatically reducing transportation and storage costs. Before the execution of this agreement, the Village of Ridgefield Park would collect EPS Styrofoam® and truck the material as far as Sussex County and Eastern Pennsylvania to be processed. Now, with the machine centrally located in Bergen County, municipalities can more easily recycle this material which can be used to manufacture new EPS Polystyrene packaging or rigid plastic products including picture frames and moldings.

Municipalities interested in entering into an Expanded Polystyrene (EPS) shared service agreement should reach out to Village Commissioner Mark Olson at [email protected].

County Executive Tedesco and Mayor Anlian were joined today by County Commissioners Mary Amoroso and Tracy Zur, Ridgefield Park Commissioners Mark Olson, Wanda Portorreal, and William G. Gerken, Teaneck Mayor Michael Pagan, Englewood Mayor Michael Wildes, Rutherford Mayor Frank Nunziato, a representative from RecycleTech Corp., a representative from Congressman Josh Gottheimer’s office, various members municipal environmental commissions and green teams, and the Sustainable Jersey Chairman Gary Sondermeyer.

A video of the full press conference and densifier demonstration is available to watch and download for fair use distribution here.

Above – County Executive Jim Tedesco placing a piece of EPS Styrofoam® in the new densifying machine

Above – Mayor John Anlian (center) looking at post densified EPS product

Above - County Executive Jim Tedesco and Ridgefield Park Mayor John Anlian cutting a ribbon alongside County Commissioners Mary Amoroso and Tracy Zur, Ridgefield Park Commissioner Mark Olson and Wanda Portorreal, Teaneck Mayor Michael Pagan, and Sustainable Jersey Chairman Gary Sondermeyer moments after the ribbon was cut

All video and photos are provided courtesy of the Office of Bergen County Executive

# # #

Baseball: Big North Conference division all-stars, 2023

The following are the Big North Conference all-star selections for the 2023 high school baseball season as selected by league coaches.Editor’s note: The NJ Advance Media baseball staff was not involved with the selection process.American DivisionFirst TeamSecond TeamHonorable MentionFreedom DivisionFirst TeamSecond TeamHonorable MentionIndependence DivisionFirst ...

The following are the Big North Conference all-star selections for the 2023 high school baseball season as selected by league coaches.

Editor’s note: The NJ Advance Media baseball staff was not involved with the selection process.

American Division

First Team

Second Team

Honorable Mention

Freedom Division

First Team

Second Team

Honorable Mention

Independence Division

First Team

Second Team

Honorable Mention

Liberty Division

First Team

Second Team

Honorable Mention

National Division

First Team

Second Team

Honorable Mention

Patriot Division

First Team

Second Team

Honorable Mention

United Division

First Team

Second Team

Honorable Mention

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