Testosterone Replacement Therapy Clinic in North Bergen, NJ | Juventee Medical Spa

TRT-Testosterone Replacement Therapy Clinic in North Bergen, NJ.

Be the Best Version of Yourself with TRT in North Bergen, NJ

The human body is amazing in so many ways. Still, we have to optimize it every now and then using science, medicine, and hard work. After 40, you may notice that your body is changing, but symptoms like low libido and lack of motivation don't have to be permanent. Juventee has the team, tools, and experience to help recapture your youth and feel better than ever before.

If you're getting older and you're worried about low testosterone, give our office a call today. It would be our pleasure to care for you using the highest quality products, backed by research and applied by professionals with your best interests in mind.

Whether you need a boost to help you get through your busy work week or a natural solution to an embarrassing problem like ED, we're here for you. Our doctors will explain your treatment options in-depth and take as much time as you need to feel comfortable and confident about TRT. Remember, when you treat your body with love and care, it will reciprocate generously. Let our team teach you the techniques to prolong your sense of youth and provide you with the treatment to solidify your wellbeing as you age with grace. Contact Juventee today. By tomorrow, you'll be one step closer to meeting the best version of yourself.

Testosterone Replacement Therapy North Bergen, NJ

Latest News in North Bergen, NJ

For some at groundbreaking of Gateway rail tunnel, there was a feeling of déjà vu

3-minute readFor several of the dignitaries gathered at the concrete desert off Tonnelle Avenue in North Bergen on Thursday to announce the start of construction on the New Jersey side of the Gateway rail tunnel entrance, there was a feeling of déjà vu.Some had been here before — when the same project launched in 2009.Back then, there was a $13.6 million contract to move the utilities, demolish a McDonald's on the future track path, and build an overpass so Tonnelle Avenue vehicle traffic could...

3-minute read

For several of the dignitaries gathered at the concrete desert off Tonnelle Avenue in North Bergen on Thursday to announce the start of construction on the New Jersey side of the Gateway rail tunnel entrance, there was a feeling of déjà vu.

Some had been here before — when the same project launched in 2009.

Back then, there was a $13.6 million contract to move the utilities, demolish a McDonald's on the future track path, and build an overpass so Tonnelle Avenue vehicle traffic could flow over the new rail tunnel entrance.

But when Gov. Chris Christie in 2010 canceled the rail tunnel project — known then as ARC — the Tonnelle overpass portion of the work had been underway for 13 months and was nearly a third of the way done. The newly constructed overpass and support beams were visible, along with piles of materials stacked and ready for installation.

Story continues below photo gallery.

After Christie's decision, the contractor was told to put back utilities, demolish some of the overpass structure and fill in the space where the construction took place.

Some 14-year-old aging concrete support beams remain stacked in rows on the site, just feet from where shovelfuls of dirt were tossed Thursday to mark the newest version of the Tonnelle Avenue overpass project.

Now, Edison-based Conti Civil LLC will do the project all over again, this time for $28.6 million.

New York-based Naik Consulting Group will be paid $12.5 million to oversee the construction of the new overpass and utility relocation to kick off what is now called the Gateway program. Some $25 million of those costs will be covered with a federal grant.

More:This NJ-NY agency can now get federal money for Gateway rail tunnel. Why that matters

$16.1 billion Gateway tunnel project

This and the $649 million concrete casing construction that began earlier this year on the Manhattan side of the tunnel are the starting pieces to the $16.1 billion Gateway tunnels project that will build a new two-track tube and rehabilitate the existing, 113-year-old tunnel.

A $2.3 billion project already underway to replace the aging and cantankerous Portal Bridge over the Hackensack River between Kearny and Secaucus with a new Portal North Bridge is also part of the first phase of Gateway.

Portal Bridge, a swing span, carries 450 Amtrak and NJ Transit trains per day. They are often delayed at the Portal Bridge because the aging components sometimes malfunction while opening and closing, causing a cascade of delays.

The improvements will make rail service more reliable for hundreds of thousands of daily NJ Transit and Amtrak riders traveling between New Jersey and Manhattan.

More:Feds add $4 billion to Gateway tunnel project, which will cut NJ's share of the cost

Though the Tonnelle Avenue project is virtually a redo, much has changed in 14 years.

Polly Trottenberg, deputy secretary at the U.S. Department of Transportation, was working there in 2010 as the assistant secretary for transportation policy and vividly remembers the day the project was canceled. But what sticks out to her now is what happened afterward.

"After that, I remember very much Amtrak coming back and saying, 'We have a fresh vision, and one thing we’re going to do this go-around is we’re going to have everyone at the table,'" Trottenberg said.

On Thursday, that was one of the messages trumpeted by the speakers.

"It really does matter that we are all in it together to make sure we are all putting funding forward, because otherwise we can’t get it done," said Kathryn Garcia, director of state operations in New York.

"But we know it’s not just about building a shiny thing," Garcia said. "We know we need to meet the needs of the next century. Commuters deserve to have plenty of space to get on and off trains safely and efficiently, and the governor has a responsibility to meet those needs creatively and in the most cost-effective way."

Nearly $11 billion in federal funds

In addition to the federal grants for Tonnelle and the concrete casing project, U.S. Sen. Chuck Schumer announced that Gateway would receive nearly $3.9 billion from the federal-state partnership grant program, on top of $6.88 billion in federal Capital Investment Grant funds that is expected to be solidified next year.

The significant federal investment lowers the costs that will be owed by New York and New Jersey.

Kris Kolluri, CEO of the Gateway Development Commission, the bistate agency that is overseeing the tunnels project, remembers being at Tonnelle in 2009 to kick off that groundbreaking. He noted that in 2009 there was just $3.8 billion of federal funding for a project estimated then to cost $8.7 billion.

"This is the right moment and it’s the right project alignment, and I think this time there is construction on both sides of the river and we are not stopping," Kolluri said.

But in order to feel the full effects of having four rail lines under the Hudson River, more money and projects will be needed to increase the capacity in New York Penn Station so more trains can come and go, plus projects to give direct access to NJ Transit rail lines whose riders are currently forced to switch trains before reaching midtown Manhattan.

"We’re going to bring new improvements and opportunities to New Jersey with every milestone we reach, because with every step we take we’re moving closer to our larger goal, building safer, healthier and happier communities," said Gov. Phil Murphy.

Girls dominate this North Jersey town's Cub Scout pack, still standing as others fall

5-minute readNorthJersey.comPROSPECT PARK — Cheerful and obedient, the members of Cub Scout Pack 2 listened closely to their leader in the cafeteria of the local elementary school.They stood in a circle, and as they reached across their bodies, each left hand latched onto a left hand, and each right hand a right. Then, as everyone was set, they attempted to undo the knot they created without letting go of their grips.It was a futile assignment, and in the end, there was only one thing to do....

5-minute read

NorthJersey.com

PROSPECT PARK — Cheerful and obedient, the members of Cub Scout Pack 2 listened closely to their leader in the cafeteria of the local elementary school.

They stood in a circle, and as they reached across their bodies, each left hand latched onto a left hand, and each right hand a right. Then, as everyone was set, they attempted to undo the knot they created without letting go of their grips.

It was a futile assignment, and in the end, there was only one thing to do. They laughed.

Only six years ago, the same children would not have been able to try such a problem-solving exercise because most of them are girls, and back then, girls could not be Cub Scouts.

Although it may seem like an anomaly that girls now rule the pack, longtime cubmaster Lisa Esteves said gender does not influence how the children behave or how much they value each other’s company.

“They’re not making the Cub Scout program more girly,” said Esteves, of Hawthorne. “It’s still the Cub Scout program.”

Boy Scouts of America first welcomed girls into the program in June 2018, departing a nearly nine-decade tradition of exclusivity.

The involvement of young women in Scouting dates to April 1971 when they were admitted to the Exploring program in which teenagers join niche posts specializing in careers that they wish to pursue.

The number of girls in area Scouting programs on the whole continues to climb each year, said Rebecca Fields, the chief executive officer of the Oakland-based Northern New Jersey Council, overseeing activities in Bergen, Essex, Hudson and Passaic counties.

Last year, Fields said, one in every 10 Scouts in North Jersey was a girl.

The Cub Scout group in Prospect Park is a “great example of how we all win,” Fields said, “when our units are open to every child.”

The local pack recently celebrated a milestone when two 10-year-old girls “crossed over” to the next level of Scouting. It was the first time that a female graduated from the group, which was established at St. Paul R.C. Church in April 1950.

Isabella Rivera and Sophia Rodríguez joined the pack when they entered kindergarten, and they are now in fifth grade. They said they became interested in the Cub Scout program because their brothers were in it. One said she learned how to use a pocketknife, and the other can tie a square knot.

“My mom couldn’t leave me at home, and she took me with her,” Isabella said, recalling how she was introduced to the group. “I thought it was really cool.”

Sophia, of Fair Lawn, said she did not mind being in a pack with boys, though she added that the blended group tends to get — ahem — lively.

“It’s a little chaotic,” Sophia observed.

Since graduating from the pack, the girls joined a Scouting troop in Glen Rock because Prospect Park does not have a unit for children their age. They said they intend to stay in the upper-level program through high school.

“I want to get to Eagle Scout,” Isabella said, “so that I can make Miss Lisa proud.”

Mia Mischuk-O’Brien, the director of communications for the Girl Scouts of Northern New Jersey in Riverdale, would not comment directly on the effect that wider acceptance in Scouting has played on her organization.

However, Mischuk-O’Brien said: “We know that girls are the future of U.S. leadership. We see their potential, and for 112 years, we provided the best leadership experience for girls because they’re at the center of everything we do.”

Volunteers are sparse

Although the Cub Scout group in Prospect Park is holding its own, packs in nearby towns are caving in due to a combination of factors.

Fields, the Scouting executive, said groups folded in Hawthorne and North Haledon amid the pandemic and that they have yet to reorganize with different leadership. “Scouting isn’t unique in its need for more volunteers,” she said.

According to a joint study released last year by AmeriCorps and the Census Bureau, the rate of volunteerism fell in every demographic category during the COVID lockdown.

People like Esteves are part of a vanishing breed.

“I’ve never been able to cultivate other leaders,” said Esteves, who is in her 28th year as the local cubmaster.

Richard Malizia Jr. was successful in resurrecting Cub Scout Pack 85 in Hawthorne, but he conceded that it was not a simple task. He said the group, which includes two girls, will resume meetings with a new leader in September following a three-year pause that started amid the pandemic.

“You don’t have a lot of unicorns out there, like me, who volunteer for multiple things,” said Malizia, also an EMT. “Our biggest challenge has always been Scouts versus sports.”

The Hawthorne pack and its associated troop are sponsored by Rea Avenue Reformed Church, and Malizia, their scoutmaster, said they have a relatively strong enrollment with 25 members.

The group that folded in Hawthorne, Cub Scout Pack 30 at St. Anthony R.C. Church, did so as a result of the COVID outbreak, said Jai Agnish, the director of communications for the Diocese of Paterson.

Agnish said its associated troop carried on for as long as possible before a difficult decision was made to also suspend its activities.

“Scouting is most welcome” at the church, Agnish said.

But as an institution, Agnish added, Scouting faces “stiff competition from many other options available to boys and girls.”

“The number of youth sports options has grown,” Agnish said, “and the expectation from coaches that their sports are year-round commitments has made it challenging on Scouting and all non-athletic options.”

Esteves said she is proud that participation in Cub Scout Pack 2 is still a choice for children in Prospect Park.

“I absolutely love this program,” Esteves said. “I believe in this program. Not every kid can play sports, but every kid can be a Cub Scout.”

The dedicated cubmaster paid out of her own pocket last month to hang a banner on an outfield fence at a North Haledon ballfield. She said she hopes that the advertisement will entice parents to sign up their children for her group.

On a recent Wednesday night, Esteves and the pack met in the lunchroom at Prospect Park School No. 1 on Brown Avenue.

The topic of their lesson was something that everyone appreciated: The “power of air.”

ELECTIONS '24:Prospect Park mayor to challenge Rep. Bill Pascrell Jr. in Democratic primary

The children, including Isabella and Sophia, hummed into plastic kazoos, and they flew paper airplanes made out of church stationery. They also tried to bounce semi-inflated basketballs.

After the thuds against the floor and the buzzes of the musical instruments, the only sound that could be heard was the laughter coming from the chorus of boys and girls whose arms were tangled in a human knot.

Philip DeVencentis is a local reporter for NorthJersey.com. For unlimited access to the most important news from your local community, please subscribe or activate your digital account today.

Email: [email protected]

Do we need fire sirens? Parents in North Jersey town say it's making their kids miserable

4-minute readParents at Clara E. Coleman Elementary School in Glen Rock wanted the fire siren atop the school silenced.Too often, they said, learning at the school is randomly interrupted by the loud whine of the ...

4-minute read

Parents at Clara E. Coleman Elementary School in Glen Rock wanted the fire siren atop the school silenced.

Too often, they said, learning at the school is randomly interrupted by the loud whine of the alarm, which seems to go off almost every day to call emergency personnel to a problem in town.

Noise levels of 109 decibels have been recorded at the building's entrance and in its playground, according to a report commissioned by the Borough Council from Garden State Environmental Inc., a Glen Rock consulting firm. That’s louder than a jackhammer, noted Jon Hendl, a parent and member of the Coleman Siren Committee, a group formed by residents. The youngest of his five children is in third grade at Coleman.

The siren is so piercing that “when it goes off, teachers have to stop teaching, which disrupts the flow of the lesson," Hendl said. "It is challenging to regain the students' focus and continue.”

After months of advocating, parents are cautiously optimistic they're close to a solution. A little peace and quiet can't come soon enough, they said.

Coleman has 334 students. In a particularly unfortunate twist of fate, it also is home to the school district’s special education programs. In a February survey conducted by the residents' committee, one-third of parents indicated their children have “noise sensory issues," organizers said.

Glen Rock's siren is unique, parents say

Coleman is the only elementary school in Bergen County with a siren on its roof, according to the group, which says the alarm is an unnecessary relic of days gone by. Its wail may have been needed once to gather volunteers at the firehouse. But pagers, emails and mobile phones can now do the trick, they said.

More than 30 Bergen County towns have abandoned such sirens, the group said.

That couldn't be independently verified by The Record and NorthJersey.com. But the scream of fire sirens has been a suburban controversy for years, leading to lawsuits in towns including Englewood Cliffs and Mahwah. Reached this past week, Bergen County Fire Marshal Timothy Ferguson declined to comment about siren protocols or the number of them still in use.

Glen Rock Fire Chief Tom Jennings also declined to comment on what other towns do but said borough officials were trying to reach a compromise.

More:Six fallen NJ firefighters among those to be honored in national ceremony

Why Fire Department needs Coleman

“It doesn't really matter what other towns do," he said in a phone conversation. "We do what's good for the borough of Glen Rock.”

The department also uses phones and pagers to alert firefighters, but neither of those methods is “110%” reliable, the chief said, so he wants the redundancy of a siren.

“I was born and raised in Glen Rock. The elementary school that I went to in Glen Rock had a fire siren on top of it,” Jennings said. “That never disrupted the classroom.”

But Hendl said the survey found that the vast majority of Coleman families have concerns: Ninety-three percent of 230 respondents wanted the siren deactivated, he said.

"I started talking with people and doing research wondering why a siren is even necessary in this day and age,” Hendl said. “I was surprised to find that Glen Rock was an outlier in the whole thing, that we're still using the siren on the school."

Student on spectrum stressed out

The stress is especially potent for Ann Kirova's 6-year-old. Kirova said her daughter is on the autism spectrum and has been particularly disturbed by the random interruptions of the siren’s blare. She struggles to stay calm and concentrate, her mother said.

“She's always had auditory sensory issues. She will cover her ears even when the noise is not that loud. So when it's at this level, it's really disconcerting,” Kirova said.

The siren sits right above the gym, in the same section of the school as its special education classrooms. The gym itself is also used for physical and occupational therapy.

Noise levels in the gym have been measured at 104 decibels. "Any kid who has either developmental delays or they are on the autism spectrum, whenever that siren goes off, they're most certainly in an area where high decibel levels register," Kirova said.

The alarm is one of eight for a 2.5-square-mile town, parents say. Is this one really needed?

Jennings, the fire chief, said school staff members have never approached him about the alarm and that he was unaware of its proximity to special education classes. Schools Superintendent Brett Charleston did not reply to requests for comment.

A compromise in sight?

A solution may be within reach. After The Record and NorthJersey.com contacted the school district and fire chief, Glen Rock Mayor Kristine Morieko sent an email to parents on Sunday.

"We all agree that in the best interests of the students, during the school day (and during the school year), that the siren may have a negative effect," she wrote. "While the principal, teachers and support staff of Coleman have never directly reached out to us, we listened to the parents who spoke, who called and who emailed.

"At 7 a.m., May 9, 2024, a programmable timer will be installed on the current siren," the mayor said. "Monday through Friday, during school hours, the siren will no longer sound. The siren will be silenced between 8 a.m. and 4:30 p.m. September-June."

Hendl welcomed the announcement. "This is a great step in the right direction," he said. But the committee wants to make sure the hours mirror the school day by starting at 7 a.m. and extending to 6:30 p.m., to reflect after-school activities like Little League.

"The deactivation hours need to be fully representative of when children are at school, including Saturdays and when summer educational programs and camps are underway," he said. "Most importantly is for us to ensure that the deactivation of the school siren is enacted as an ordinance or resolution" so it can't be undone in the future.

Gene Myers covers disability and mental health for NorthJersey.com and the USA TODAY Network. For unlimited access to the most important news from your local community, please subscribe or activate your digital account today.

Powered By

Think outside the brunch this Mother's Day: 7 ways to celebrate mom in North Jersey

Maddie McGayWhile brunch might be your go-to activity to celebrate Mother's Day each year, chances are you've spent countless hours trying to book reservations and fight crowded restaurants every time it comes around. So, why not switch it up this year?The possibilities for celebrating Mother's Day in North Jersey are limitless, so make this May 12 unforgettable by maki...

Maddie McGay

While brunch might be your go-to activity to celebrate Mother's Day each year, chances are you've spent countless hours trying to book reservations and fight crowded restaurants every time it comes around. So, why not switch it up this year?

The possibilities for celebrating Mother's Day in North Jersey are limitless, so make this May 12 unforgettable by making some unique memories with mom. Whether she enjoys learning a new skill, exploring nature, or just having a day of rest and relaxation, we have some suggestions for you.

Painting with a Twist, Montville

If you're looking to create a special keepsake while spending some quality time together, plan a trip to Painting with a Twist in Montville. On Mother's Day, they will be hosting three painting sessions throughout the day: 10 a.m. to noon, 1 to 3 p.m. and 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. As it is a BYOB studio, all guests are invited to bring their favorite adult beverage and any finger foods to munch on during their two-hour sessions. Tickets for each session are $40 per person, and tickets must be purchased ahead of time online.

Go: 440 Main Road, Montville; 973-794-6390, paintingwithatwist.com.

Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater at NJPAC, Newark

For the dance fans, take mom to the 3 p.m. matinee performance of the Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater at the New Jersey Performing Arts Center on Mother's Day. The mixed-repertory program is a Mother's Day tradition at the NJPAC, and it will feature performances like Revelations, Me Myself and You, Solo and Survivor. There are also two other showings on Friday and Saturday night, featuring some different performances than those expected on Sunday. Tickets are $29 per person and can be purchased online.

Go: 1 Center St., Newark; 888-466-5722, njpac.org.

Mother's Day workshop at the Morris County School of Glass, Morristown

Bond over learning a new skill together this Mother's Day with a special glassblowing workshop at the Morris County School of Glass. During their two-hour Mother's Day "Brunch-Bites"-N-Blow sessions — held from 10 a.m. to noon and 1 to 3 p.m. — you can learn how to create your very own glass flowers, hearts and vases, complete with snacks and a champagne toast. The classes, which are taught at a beginners' level, cost $130 per person ages 12 and older. Space is limited, so reservations are required.

Go: 89 Whippany Road, Morristown; 973-734-0900, mcsog.com.

Mother's Day wine tasting at Ventimiglia Vineyard, Wantage

If you and mom are wine connoisseurs, or are looking to expand your palates, take part in the Mother's Day weekend wine tastings at Ventimiglia Vineyard. From 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. both Saturday and Sunday, the vineyard will be hosting open wine tastings for $10 per person. Their selection of wine, which are all made in small batches, includes red and white, ranging from chardonnay, Wantage white, chambourcin and cabernet Franc.

Go: 101 Layton Road, Wantage; 973-875-4333, ventivines.com.

Paint your heart out at Color Me Mine, Ridgewood

For those looking to get in touch with their artistic side this Mother's Day, but don't necessarily want to take part in a guided class, stop by Color Me Mine in Ridgewood. At this paint-your-own-pottery studio, you and mom can choose from their wide range of unpainted ceramic pieces, such as plates, mugs, figurines, trays and more. Then, simply select your desirable color palette of paints and brushes, and design your item to your hearts content. Afterwards, the painted ceramic piece will be glazed and fired, so it will be food-safe, dishwasher safe and microwave safe. Prices vary depending on the type and size of the ceramic, and reservations are recommended.

Go: 210 E Ridgewood Ave., Ridgewood; 201-445-4898, ridgewood.colormemine.com.

Celebrate National Public Gardens Day at Macculloch Hall, Morristown

What says Mother's Day more than some bright, freshly blossomed flowers? National Public Gardens Day is held each year on the Friday before Mother's Day, meaning there are tons of events where you can explore some of North Jersey's most magnificent gardens. At the Macculloch Hall Historic Museum in Morristown, there will be a free event on Saturday, May 11 from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. in their historic gardens. Highlights of the garden include wisteria, sundial, sassafras trees, heirloom roses and more, and the event will feature presentations from Eyes of the Wild and Paws 4 a Cause Seeing Eye Puppy Club, demonstrations with a soil scientist, scavenger hunts, art activities and teacup planters for sale.

Go: 45 Macculloch Ave., Morristown; 973-538-2404, maccullochhall.org.

Treat mom to a spa day at Sojo Spa Club, Edgewater

The riverside retreat of Sojo Spa Club in Edgewater is offering special packages in honor of Mother's Day, so why not treat mom to a day of rest and relaxation? The spa is offering a special gift certificate package, which covers the choice of an aromatherapy, deep muscle or heated sale stone 60-minute massage, as well as the cost of tax, tip and valet parking for $275. Sojo Spa Club is also offering gift card deals, such as an extra $25 automatically added to any gift card purchase worth $200 or more. Outside of these offers, the spa offers other services like acupressure therapy, a Korean body scrub, a volcanic sand bath and halotherapy.

Go: 660 River Road, Edgewater; 201-313-7200, sojospaclub.com.

Maddie McGay is the real estate reporter for NorthJersey.com and The Record, covering all things worth celebrating about living in North Jersey. Find her on Instagram @maddiemcgay, on X @maddiemcgayy, and sign up for her North Jersey Living newsletter. Do you have a tip, trend or terrific house she should know about? Email her at MMcGay@gannett.com.

Longtime North Jersey assistant approved as new Park Ridge football coach

In the end, the choice was clear for Park Ridge.Jim Cleary, the Owls' defensive coordinator the last two seasons, was approved as the team's new head football coach by the district’s Board of Education on Monday night.It will be the 50-year-old’s first varsity head coaching job, and his excitement was palpable during a long phone conversation Tuesday afternoon.“It’s my home town, Park Ridge is a very, very special place, it’s smalltown Americana,” Cleary said. “It&...

In the end, the choice was clear for Park Ridge.

Jim Cleary, the Owls' defensive coordinator the last two seasons, was approved as the team's new head football coach by the district’s Board of Education on Monday night.

It will be the 50-year-old’s first varsity head coaching job, and his excitement was palpable during a long phone conversation Tuesday afternoon.

“It’s my home town, Park Ridge is a very, very special place, it’s smalltown Americana,” Cleary said. “It’s beautiful on a Friday night. The kids are fantastic, the parents are some of the finest people you will ever find. I love Park Ridge and the community here.”

Cleary played Division III football at Wartberg College in Iowa, and got his degree in history and education. He added a master's in administration from NJCU and a special education certification from Caldwell College.

All along, he knew he wanted to teach and coach. He’s been a history teacher the last 21 years, at Pascack Hills and Pascack Valley. He served as an assistant football coach at Pascack Valley under Craig Nielsen from 2010 to 2016, then worked under Mike Carter at Bloomfield before joining Tom Curry IV’s staff at Park Ridge as defensive coordinator in 2022.

Park Ridge has been one of the most successful Group 1 schools in Bergen County, reaching the North Jersey Interscholastic Conference championship game three times and winning a sectional championship in 2019.

After nine seasons, Curry IV accepted a post at Secaucus High School. The Owls went 7-3 last season.

“We don’t need to reinvent anything,” Cleary said. “I don’t think there is pressure to win, but we will do this the right way with the right people and let the score take care of itself, but I am a competitor. I want to win.”

The Owls lose a tremendous senior class led by quarterback Cole Hughes (Lehigh) and lineman Deron McLaughlin (UConn).

“We lost generational talent,” Cleary said. “Some of the best players I ever coached, but one thing I have learned is I am not coaching a team, but a program. We will do things the same way and keep this program going in the right direction. My vision for Park Ridge football is that we are all one team from grades 3-12. We’re all in this together; the players, the cheerleaders, the town, when we walk across that bridge on Friday night, we know the whole town is behind us.”

The bulk of the Owls football staff is staying in place. Cleary will likely remain calling the defense, but he will adjust according to what works best for the staff.

Cleary met with the Owls on Tuesday afternoon. He’s going to stay as a teacher at Pascack Hills - the drive takes four minutes to get to the Owls practice field. His message to the team was that he was proud to take over and lead them.

“I found out very early on, they don’t care what you know, until they know you care,” Cleary said. “My focus is on helping our players be the best they can possibly be.”

Disclaimer:

This website publishes news articles that contain copyrighted material whose use has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. The non-commercial use of these news articles for the purposes of local news reporting constitutes "Fair Use" of the copyrighted materials as provided for in Section 107 of the US Copyright Law.
Contact Us