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Testosterone Replacement Therapy Lyndhurst, NJ

Latest News in Lyndhurst, NJ

Work begins on Lyndhurst's new $31 million NJ Transit station

LYNDHURST — Work has begun on a $31 million ADA-accessible train station that will replace a 107-year-old station.The new station, on NJ Transit's Main Line, will be at the intersection of Delafield and Court avenues, closer to the commuter parking lot than the station it is replacing a few hundred yards north."I am thrilled that our long-standing efforts and lobbying with NJ Transit have come to fruition,” Lyndhurst Mayor Robert Giangeruso said. “This new train station is critical in building smart growt...

LYNDHURST — Work has begun on a $31 million ADA-accessible train station that will replace a 107-year-old station.

The new station, on NJ Transit's Main Line, will be at the intersection of Delafield and Court avenues, closer to the commuter parking lot than the station it is replacing a few hundred yards north.

"I am thrilled that our long-standing efforts and lobbying with NJ Transit have come to fruition,” Lyndhurst Mayor Robert Giangeruso said. “This new train station is critical in building smart growth infrastructure and is key to ensuring a prosperous future for Lyndhurst while also enhancing the quality of life of our residents.”

The station is designed to blend in with the Lyndhurst neighborhood and will include ADA-accessible platforms, four elevators and stairs, lighting, canopies, communications technology and closed-circuit TV.

The ADA-compliant parking lot will be next to the new station on property owned by the township under a lease agreement between Lyndhurst and NJ Transit.

The $30.9 million for the project was provided by the state's partners at the Federal Transit Administration.

NJ Transit’s board of directors approved a construction contract for $18.5 million for the project in September, awarding it to Anselmi & Decicco Inc. of Maplewood.

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The station, pre-COVID 19, served an average of about 1,000 weekday passengers.

"We celebrate the beginning of construction work on a new rail station that will not only enhance accessibility, mobility and the customer experience for Bergen County residents who use Lyndhurst Station, it will support the state’s economic recovery and drive economic growth as we come out of the pandemic,” NJ Transit President and CEO Kevin S. Corbett said. The groundbreaking ceremony was last week.

The project is one of many station enhancements under a five-year capital plan that includes ongoing work at Newark Penn Station, Hoboken Terminal, Elizabeth Station, and stations in Perth Amboy, New Brunswick and North Brunswick, Corbett said.

Kristie Cattafi is a local reporter for NorthJersey.com. For unlimited access to the most important news from your local community, please subscribe or activate your digital account today.

Email: [email protected]

How did Lyndhurst schools rack up $5M deficit? Auditor report coming

A private auditing firm is expected to release findings on Monday that may explain why the Lyndhurst school district has a nearly $5 million deficit.The deficit was revealed last January, when the former superintendent of schools said failure to issue the proper approval for expenditures and faulty bookkeeping...

A private auditing firm is expected to release findings on Monday that may explain why the Lyndhurst school district has a nearly $5 million deficit.

The deficit was revealed last January, when the former superintendent of schools said failure to issue the proper approval for expenditures and faulty bookkeeping were to blame for the shortfall, originally thought to be $1.1 million.

A review of five years' worth of district documents by NorthJersey.com and the USA TODAY NETWORK New Jersey shows that the district's business office accepted invoices from vendors for work that had already been completed, but which had not been authorized through proper procedures. The documents were acquired through a public records request.

Purchase orders, invoices and payment vouchers for plumbing and electrical work between the district and two local contractors were examined and showed that invoices seeking payment for completed work preceded purchase orders.

The district, the documents show, regularly accepted invoices for electrical and plumbing work completed by contractors throughout district schools before purchase orders for the repairs were done.

The proper procedure calls for purchase orders to be filed and approved by the district before any work can be completed, said former Superintendent Shauna DeMarco. The purchase orders also set a general price for the work.

One year ago, DeMarco attributed the financial woes to a mistake with purchase orders and the "re-classification" of funds. She said district administrators took costs absorbed in one year and transferred them to the another year's budget.

"The re-classification caused significant overspending in terms of quantities and amounts," DeMarco said in a statement last January.

The cause of the failure to issue purchase orders was never explained, nor were specifics as to what expenditures were missing approved orders.

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"Business administrators in public schools are to have purchase orders in place prior to services being rendered," DeMarco wrote in an email in November. "Payments should be remitted following board approval [...] via resolution."

But this was not the case. Multiple bills were commingled on retroactive purchase orders that include such specific information as corresponding invoice numbers.

Of more than 60 invoices submitted by one contractor between 2015 and 2016, two purchase orders for the same period retroactively approved 12 individual invoices. Another purchase order retroactively approved nine.

"They clearly took the bill and used it to create the purchase order," said Bill Morrison, a forensic accountant with WithumSmith+Brown, as he looked over invoices and orders from multiple school years.

"A purchase order should be more general," he said, referring to orders that contained nearly narrative explanations of repairs, such as one line item written in the past tense: "Roosevelt School — Removed existing slop sink and faucet in boiler room and installed new sink and faucet with all necessary piping."

In another case, a plumber who was approved by a Board of Education resolution for $1,611 of work during the 2016-17 school year received $18,764 in payment.

Documents showed that close to $15,000 of those repairs were completed after September 2017 and through spring 2018. But those payments are included on a check registry for the 2016-17 school year.

The district has been undergoing a financial audit by the firm Lerch, Vinci and Higgins. Its auditor, Jeffrey Bliss, will deliver his report at a public meeting of the Board of Education on Monday night. This presentation was offered to the board’s finance committee last week, but officials said they could not comment on Bliss' findings until his report was made public.

Although Bliss was hired by school officials, the state Department of Education assigned a financial monitor to the district after the deficit was first announced in January 2018.

That monitor, Tom Egan, dropped a bombshell on the Township Commission last week, stating that a 2016 school renovation project was so poorly handled that the district bonded about $5 million dollars less than the project would cost, calling the process a "disaster."

Asked whether Bliss found the same problematic bookkeeping practices, Egan said he could not comment until after Monday's presentation. Scott Bisig, the district business administrator, said the same thing.

Bliss and the district's former business administrator, David DiPisa, did not respond to multiple requests for comment. DiPisa left Lyndhurst for a similar position within the Bergenfield district in August 2017, before the deficit was made public.

Lyndhurst Board of Education seeks resident to replace arrested member-elect

LYNDHURST — The school board is soliciting residents interested in filling a vacant seat, to end a two-month impasse due to the premature resignation of a member-elect.Any resident who meets the requirements of board membership can apply for the vacant seat, said Thomas Egan, a financial monitor brought in by the state Education Department to examine a $5 million deficit.The board and its secretary will revue all applications and board members will vote on a replacement at the next meeting."The goal is that th...

LYNDHURST — The school board is soliciting residents interested in filling a vacant seat, to end a two-month impasse due to the premature resignation of a member-elect.

Any resident who meets the requirements of board membership can apply for the vacant seat, said Thomas Egan, a financial monitor brought in by the state Education Department to examine a $5 million deficit.

The board and its secretary will revue all applications and board members will vote on a replacement at the next meeting.

"The goal is that the new person will be hopefully appointed on January 28, so that there is not a big gap," Egan said during the board's organizational meeting on Monday.

Resident Vincent Tunnero won one of three board seats in November's election. Soon after, news broke that he had been arrested on Oct. 25 in Seaside Heights on charges that he had kept thousands of dollars for remodeling jobs he had not completed.

As word spread, he announced his intention to resign, though he was rejecting a seat that what was not yet his to reject, causing confusion among education and election officials from Lyndhurst, the county and the state.

On Monday, with the departure of three sitting members and the swearing in of their replacements, Tunnero's absence from the ceremony created an official vacancy, which the district may now fill.

Meanwhile, Frank Ferrandino and Richard Pizzuti Jr. took their seats as the two newest members. Outgoing members are Ron Grillo, Sheri Jarvis and Josephine Malaniak. Of those three, only Jarvis sought re-election.

Jarvis said she had not made up her mind whether she would apply to fill the vacancy and reclaim her old seat.

"I don’t know if I want to be up on the stage or in the audience," she said Tuesday.

She said nothing is out of the question but conceded, "It feels good to be on the other side."

The election of three newcomers is the latest turn in the story of a district facing insurmountable financial woes and exodus of administrative brass, including former Superintendent Shauna DeMarco, who left in June after only one year of her five-year contract, and Business Administrator David DiPisa, who departed the district in 2017.

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As outgoing member Ron Grillo accepted a proclamation in honor of his nine consecutive terms on the dais, he referenced the money concerns plaguing the district.

"I’ve always tried to think of the children, that was my first priority," he told the audience. "It wasn’t money, obviously, because we have some problems with money. Money never concerned me that much."

Some board members, he said, put money first.

He wished Ferrandino and Pizzuti well, and advised them to remember they are there for the students.

It was revealed last year that the district discovered a $1.1 million deficit on its books, which may now be as high as $5 million, according to Egan.

The state Department of Education is expected to present Egan's findings at the Jan. 28 board meeting.

Medieval Times Performers Banish Union Officials from Buena Park, CA, and Lyndhurst, NJ, Castles

Washington, DC (March 14, 2023) – Performers at dinner theater concept Medieval Times’ locations in Buena Park, CA, and Lyndhurst, NJ, have claimed victory as American Guild of Variety Artists (AGVA) union officials submitted paperwork declaring they will abandon both workplaces. The AGVA union’s “disclaimers of interest” come after majorities of actors from both locations backed petitions asking the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) to hold elections on whether to remove the AGVA union. Art...

Washington, DC (March 14, 2023) – Performers at dinner theater concept Medieval Times’ locations in Buena Park, CA, and Lyndhurst, NJ, have claimed victory as American Guild of Variety Artists (AGVA) union officials submitted paperwork declaring they will abandon both workplaces. The AGVA union’s “disclaimers of interest” come after majorities of actors from both locations backed petitions asking the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) to hold elections on whether to remove the AGVA union. Artemisia Morley and Michelle Dean submitted the union “decertification petitions” on behalf of performers at the New Jersey and California locations, respectively.

Both Morley and Dean received free legal aid from the National Right to Work Foundation in navigating the NLRB’s union decertification process. The NLRB is the federal agency responsible for enforcing federal labor law, which includes administering elections to install (or “certify”) and remove (or “decertify”) unions. Both Morley’s and Dean’s petitions contained signatures from a majority of employees at their respective locations.

AGVA union officials attempted to block the New Jersey decertification vote by filing “blocking charges,” which are often-unrelated allegations against management meant to derail a vote. However, AGVA union officials in both New Jersey and California eventually chose to withdraw from the workplaces as opposed to fighting Foundation attorneys at the NLRB. In New Jersey, AGVA union officials departed before the decertification vote could take place, likely to avoid an embarrassing outcome.

Because California and New Jersey lack Right to Work protections for their private sector workers, AGVA union bosses had the power to enter into contracts with Medieval Times management that would have required employees to pay union dues or fees just to keep their jobs. In contrast, in Right to Work states, union membership and all union financial support are strictly voluntary.

However, in both non-Right to Work states and Right to Work states, union bosses have power over the working conditions of every employee in a unionized workplace, including those who don’t support the union. A successful decertification effort strips union officials of that monopoly bargaining power.

AGVA Union Officials Tried to Use Strikes to Gain Power, but Only Angered Workers

AGVA union officials advocated for, or ordered, unpopular strikes at both the California and New Jersey Medieval Times locations around when each decertification petition was submitted. Filings in Morley’s NLRB case indicated that AGVA union officials were “secretive, self-interested, and divisive,” and continuously advocated a strike despite disapproval from workers at the Lyndhurst, NJ, castle.

Similarly, AGVA union officials called off a roughly nine-month-long strike at the Buena Park, CA, Medieval Times just before Dean filed her decertification petition.

The tide substantially turned against AGVA union officials in New Jersey after Morley’s Foundation attorneys successfully challenged a decision from an NLRB Regional Director that halted the Lyndhurst decertification vote based on union officials’ “blocking charges.” The NLRB in Washington, DC, ordered that a hearing be held to determine whether union bosses’ “blocking charges” had anything to do with employee discontent with the union, but AGVA disclaimed interest before the hearing could occur.

Employees Across U.S. Seeking Freedom from Union Control

Across the country, workers are increasingly attempting to exercise their right to vote out union officials they disapprove of. According to NLRB data, since 2020 decertification petition filings have gone up by over 40%. Despite this trend, the Biden NLRB is attempting to make it substantially more difficult for workers to decertify unions, and could soon issue a final rule invalidating the Election Protection Rule, a policy which contains multiple important safeguards regarding employees’ right to decertify unions they oppose.

“AGVA union officials treated each Medieval Times castle as their own personal fiefdom, but their actions led to an uprising of the rank-and-file they purported to ‘represent,’” commented National Right to Work Foundation President Mark Mix. “While the wishes of the Medieval Times performers have been obtained, it should be remembered that workers all over the country are subjected to union control they oppose.”

The National Right to Work Legal Defense Foundation is a nonprofit, charitable organization providing free legal aid to employees whose human or civil rights have been violated by compulsory unionism abuses. The Foundation, which can be contacted toll-free at 1-800-336-3600, assists thousands of employees in about 200 cases nationwide per year.

N.J. football All-State, All-Group teams and full postseason honors for 2023

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