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N.J. native, 10-year-NBA veteran honored with court dedication: ‘A hero is back in town’

When Kyle Anderson walked down the stairs and into the basement of the Lincoln School on Tuesday morning, his face lit up.As a student at the middle school in Fairview, N.J., Anderson had honed his basketball skills on the small basement court underneath the Bergen County school. Now it was being renamed in his honor as Kyle Anderson Court.“It probably takes me back to the beginning, the beginning stages of my career, being a student here, going through everyday life with these teachers and with my classmates and now to s...

When Kyle Anderson walked down the stairs and into the basement of the Lincoln School on Tuesday morning, his face lit up.

As a student at the middle school in Fairview, N.J., Anderson had honed his basketball skills on the small basement court underneath the Bergen County school. Now it was being renamed in his honor as Kyle Anderson Court.

“It probably takes me back to the beginning, the beginning stages of my career, being a student here, going through everyday life with these teachers and with my classmates and now to see 20 years later, that I’m able to be celebrated and commemorated and just lead the way for the kids after me, that means a lot to me,” Anderson, who is about to enter his 10th NBA season and his second with the Minnesota Timberwolves, told NJ Advance Media.

Anderson, 29, is nicknamed “SlowMo” because of his ability to play the game at a slower tempo that suits his pace and allows him to create for others. He was the No. 30 pick of the San Antonio Spurs in 2014 after two seasons at UCLA, which he helped lead to the Sweet 16 that year. He split his high school career between Paterson Catholic and St. Anthony’s, going 65-0 under Bob Hurley at the latter and leading the program to back-to-back Tournament of Champions titles. Hurley, the Naismith Hall of Fame coach who was in attendance Tuesday with his wife Chris, called him a “modern-day Magic Johnson” at the time.

Both Paterson Catholic and St. Anthony’s are now closed due to financial reasons, so the Lincoln School holds added meaning for Anderson.

“Oh for sure, definitely,” he said. “I don’t have any high school or anything like that. It’s special, it’s a special deal.”

All the students in the district sat in the sun on a warm day to greet and cheer for Anderson. One fan held a sign that read, “Welcome home, Kyle Anderson.”

“Today is a big day for Fairview, a hero is back in town,” said John Hogan, the Bergen County Clerk. “Kyle Anderson is back in Fairview.”

Anderson gives out turkeys to members of the community near the school each Thanksgiving, and also held a Celebrate Life day in 2022, a three-day basketball tournament and half-day clinic open to children .

The 6-foot-9 Anderson averaged 9.4 points, 5.3 rebounds and 4.9 assists last season for the Timberwolves, who lost to the LeBron James and the Lakers in the Play-In Tournament. He holds career averages of 7.0 points, 4.5 rebounds and 2.6 assists.

Anderson is one of three New Jersey natives on the Wolves, along with former St. Joe’s-Metuchen star Karl-Anthony Towns and former Roselle Catholic forward Naz Reid. The practice court at Kean University is also named after Towns’s late mother, Jacqueline.

“Yeah, it’s awesome, really,” Anderson said of his Jersey teammates. “I can relate to those guys, I’ve watched them growing up. But I really love our team in general, like our whole team. I’m really excited. We got a good young group of guys. I think we’re a little battle-tested, too, so this will be a special year for us.”

One of his teammates, guard Anthony Edwards, just competed with USA Basketball for the team that lost back-to-back games to Germany and Canada and finished fourth at the FIBA World Cup.

“It’s tough, those teams are really good,” Anderson said. “Some people think [American] NBA players are just going to wipe the floor with them, but that’s not the case. The talent is really good in Europe, those guys have been playing together for a long time, the Germany team, the Serbian team, so it’s not easy for the USA to go in there and win.”

As for his own goals heading into his free-agent season, Anderson said, “Just have a good year, have fun every day. I’m getting into year 10 so I just wanna make sure I enjoy this. It could be over like this, so this is the later half of my career so I just want to enjoy it.”

In terms of his impending free agency, he said, “I don’t really focus on that stuff, honestly. I just want to get better every day, play as well as I can and go from there. Everything will handle itself.”

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Adam Zagoria is a freelance reporter who covers Seton Hall and NJ college basketball for NJ Advance Media. You may follow him on Twitter @AdamZagoria and check out his Website at ZAGSBLOG.com.

These Bergen County school districts will have special March election

3-minute readBallots have been sent to voters with vote-by-mail requests in Carlstadt, East Rutherford, Fairview and Little Ferry for the March 12 special election.Voters in those four municipalities will decide whether to approve funding for various school projects.Referendum in Carlstadt and East RutherfordCarlstadt and East Rutherford voters will weigh in on ...

3-minute read

Ballots have been sent to voters with vote-by-mail requests in Carlstadt, East Rutherford, Fairview and Little Ferry for the March 12 special election.

Voters in those four municipalities will decide whether to approve funding for various school projects.

Referendum in Carlstadt and East Rutherford

Carlstadt and East Rutherford voters will weigh in on Becton Regional High School's proposed $49.2 million bond to fund new special education, trades and vocational space, and to buy property for a new gymnasium and renovate the current gym.

A $55 million version of the plan was defeated by voters in March 2022. The referendum March 12 splits the proposal into three questions with a total cost of $49.2 million.

The first question is about a $29.5 million proposal for STEM, special education and vocational space. The new proposal reduces the addition from 90,000 square feet to 47,000, eliminating a new building for vocational training previously proposed across the street.

More:Which NJ hospitals are the best for giving birth? This new data tool can help

Question two is on a new gym, the renovation of the existing gym and a performing arts center at $12.8 million. The property would be purchased to build a new regulation-size gymnasium, with renovations to the existing gym, and a performing arts center, bathrooms and locker rooms.

The third question asks voters to approve $7 million for renovations to the school's annex building at 160 Paterson Ave. for trades and vocational program space.

The mayor and council of Carlstadt, one of three communities served by the high school, came out in opposition to the plan. A resolution and letter opposing Becton Regional's referendum was issued by the mayor and council of Carlstadt, mostly due to unresolved issues.

East Rutherford homeowners with an average home value of $426,302 and Carlstadt homeowners with an average home value $445,779 would see a tax impact of $0.03 per $100 assessed valuation for Question 1, and $0.01 per $100 assessed valuation each for Questions 2 and 3.

That would be an average increased tax bill of $144 per year if Question 1 is approved, or $252 per year if all three questions are approved.

More:Teacher shortage, school funding will be new NJ education commissioner's top challenges

Referendum in Fairview

The Fairview Board of Education is looking to build a 91,334-square-foot, four-story middle school building. The school, with 24 classrooms for grades six to eight, would cost about $60 million, with $35 million coming from capital reserve funds.

The building would also feature small group instructional classrooms, science labs, music and art classrooms, a gymnasium, a cafeteria, a media center, student lounges and office space.

Roughly $10.8 million in state aid has been approved for the project. If voters approve the proposal, Fairview homeowners with an average assessed home value of $466,924 would see a tax impact of about $396 per year over 25 years.

Referendum in Little Ferry

In Little Ferry, voters will be asked to approve a $38 million proposal for a new middle school on Liberty Street.

The 65,000-square-foot, three-story building would be constructed at the former site of Washington Elementary School, which closed in June 2018 due to its deteriorating condition. Workers are demolishing the 110-year-old brick building to clear the site for the planned sixth through eighth grade school.

The proposal includes classrooms designed for collaboration and hands-on learning, science labs, modern safety and accessibility features, and a cafeteria with a working kitchen that would provide fresh food for students at the new school and Memorial School across the street.

The building also would feature two outdoor recreation spaces, including a rooftop area that could be used for recess, gym, outdoor learning or lunches. The average property owner, with a home assessed at $375,501, would pay an estimated $50 per month in school debt taxes.

Voters can track their ballots at vote.nj.gov.

Drop box locations have been placed at Carlstadt Borough Hall at 500 Madison St., Fairview Library at 213 Anderson Ave., the County Administration Building at 1 Bergen County Plaza in Hackensack, Ridgefield Community Center at 725 Slocum Ave., and Rutherford Borough Hall at 176 Park Ave. The drop boxes will be open through March 12 at 8 p.m.

Fire Updates For Fairview, NJ

After another active day of severe weather across the Plains, a new round of severe weather will be possible today from the southern Plains to the Midwest.A line of gusty, drenching thunderstorms continues to sweep across portions of Texas, Oklahoma, and Louisiana this morning. Farther north, another complex of thunderstorms continues to rumble across portions of Kansas, Nebraska, and Iowa.An area of low pressure helping to fuel these thunderstorms will bring locally strong thunderstorms into portions of the Upper Midwest into ...

After another active day of severe weather across the Plains, a new round of severe weather will be possible today from the southern Plains to the Midwest.

A line of gusty, drenching thunderstorms continues to sweep across portions of Texas, Oklahoma, and Louisiana this morning. Farther north, another complex of thunderstorms continues to rumble across portions of Kansas, Nebraska, and Iowa.

An area of low pressure helping to fuel these thunderstorms will bring locally strong thunderstorms into portions of the Upper Midwest into the Missouri Valley today. Small hail and wind gusts greater than 50 mph will be the primary threats from these thunderstorms.

Farther south, in wake of the morning thunderstorms, the atmosphere is expected to become unstable once again later this afternoon across portions of western Texas into Oklahoma. Here, the government's Storm Prediction Center has issued a Slight Risk, or a 2 out 5 on the severe weather probability scale, for thunderstorms later this afternoon into tonight.

Large hail, damaging wind gusts in excess of 60 mph, and isolated tornadoes will be possible from thunderstorms. Cities in Texas at risk include Abilene, Fort Worth, and Wichita Falls.

In addition, locally heavy rainfall will be possible across eastern Texas into Louisiana today. Flood Watches have been posted between these areas. Localized rainfall amounts of one to three inches can result in flooding, especially in urban areas as well as in low-lying and poor drainage areas. This includes Tyler and Lufkin, Texas, and Shreveport and Alexandria, La. Remember, if you approach a flooded roadway, it is always best to “Turn Around, Don’t Drown!”

Make sure to know the difference between a watch and a warning should they become issued. A watch means that conditions are favorable for severe weather to occur and to be on alert for any rapidly changing conditions. A warning means that severe weather is imminent, and you should act fast to remain safe.

The best way to remain safe is to stay prepared and informed about your local weather. Have a severe weather kit packed with a battery-operated radio, water and non-perishable food items should you be without power for long periods of time. Also, check the WeatherBug app frequently for any updates on today’s severe weather. Remember, “When Thunder Roars, Go Indoors!”

Bergen County City Makes NJEDA List Of Food Desert Communities

FAIRVIEW, NJ — Fairview is one of 50 cities in New Jersey considered to be a food desert community by the New Jersey Economic Development Authority.The authority's board approved a list of food desert communities throughout the state that may be eligible for Food Desert Relief Act funding.Fairview had a score of 48.3 out of 100 for overall access to healthy foods, according to the authority’s list of state food desert communities.The authority based its scores on a city's food retail environment, demographics...

FAIRVIEW, NJ — Fairview is one of 50 cities in New Jersey considered to be a food desert community by the New Jersey Economic Development Authority.

The authority's board approved a list of food desert communities throughout the state that may be eligible for Food Desert Relief Act funding.

Fairview had a score of 48.3 out of 100 for overall access to healthy foods, according to the authority’s list of state food desert communities.

The authority based its scores on a city's food retail environment, demographics and economic and health indicators.

Fairview residents share a retail area with Hudson County, where approximately 303,129 residents are underserved, according to the authority's report.

Find out what's happening in Mahwahwith free, real-time updates from Patch.

“Access is key,” Susan Colacurcio, executive director of Fairview’s Franciscan Community Development Center, said in the report. “These people don’t have cars, they can’t afford taxis or jitneys, so they have to be able to walk to the sore. The stroller is the universal carrier. If there’s a child in the stroller, they carry less food per trip.”

Gov. Phil Murphy in January 2021 signed into law the Economic Recovery Act, part of which included the Food Desert Relief Act, which required the development authority to address food insecurity within cities across the state.

The authority will provide up to $240 million in funding through the relief act, with up to $40 million per year for six years in tax credits, loans, grants and technical assistance to increase access to nutritious food and help alleviate food deserts.

A January U.S. Census Bureau survey found that almost one in 13 New Jersey households reported not having enough to eat in the past seven days, the authority reported. There were more than 1.5 million people in all 21 of the state’s counties living in a food desert community.

The development authority expected to issue regulations later this year, “a critical step in the development of any Food Desert Relief Act-related programs,” it said.

“New Jersey has long been at the forefront in the fight against food insecurity,” said Lt. Gov. Sheila Oliver, commissioner of the Department of Community Affairs, in a statement. “We have a moral duty to reduce food insecurity within our state’s borders and the programs we create under the Food Desert Relief Act will strengthen our ability to connect New Jerseyans in the 50 designated Food Desert communities with access to much-needed nutritious food.”

Here is a list of the food desert communities in North Jersey:

Go here to view the full list.

FRANCISCAN COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT CENTER OPENS REIMAGINED FOOD PANTRY SPACE IN FAIRVIEW

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: April 26, 2023CONTACT:Derek [email protected], NJ – The Franciscan Community Development Center of Fairview celebrated the grand re-opening of its food pantry space, which after months of renovation has been transformed into a client choice pantry model for the residents of Fairview, the first of its kind in the ...

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:

April 26, 2023

CONTACT:

Derek Sands

[email protected]

Fairview, NJ – The Franciscan Community Development Center of Fairview celebrated the grand re-opening of its food pantry space, which after months of renovation has been transformed into a client choice pantry model for the residents of Fairview, the first of its kind in the community.

Made possible by a partnership between Bergen County, the Archdiocese of Newark, the Community Food Bank of New Jersey, and Habitat for Humanity of Bergen County – demolition of the existing pantry began in October 2022, with pantry operations moving to a temporary space on church grounds. With the help of the Habitat for Humanity Grey Heads and donated services and materials from RSC Architects and the Kuiken Brothers Company, the pantry was rebuilt and reimagined from the ground up. Improvements to the space include a redesigned layout that will allow for the client choice pantry model, a new walk-in refrigerator and freezer to help Franciscan receive more perishable items like meats and fresh produce, a redesigned loading and receiving area for deliveries, and a new ADA compliant entrance and bathroom for clients among others. The opening of the new pantry space will also allow FCDC to convert their temporary pantry space to help provide additional services and programs for clients.

“The Franciscan Community Development Center is a community lifeline for thousands of residents in eastern Bergen County every single day. Thanks to critical funds provided by the County’s Food Security Task Force and the pro-bono efforts of several local partners, the newly completed renovations grant the FCDC the ability to expand their efforts and continue to serve their residents with the dignity and respect they deserve,” said Bergen County Executive Jim Tedesco. “Know that Bergen County remains steadfast in our commitment to support our emergency food providers through the Task Force as we work towards ending hunger in Bergen County once and for all.”

“Today we unveil a new beginning at the FCDC, to expand food access with dignity,” said Bergen County Commissioner Tracy Zur. “This renovation, which exemplified collaboration between all sectors, will enable a choice-style food pantry and an even greater abundance of healthy food to be distributed. They will be changing health outcomes and changing lives.”

“Thank you to the many partners in this project, who through their efforts will help turn Fairview from a food desert to an oasis,” said Su Colacurcio, Director of the Franciscan Community Development Center. “The work that everyone has put in here lives up to the code of St. Francis: we did what was necessary and what was possible – in order to make the impossible happen.”

It was truly a privilege to work on this project with such a dedicated group of people who do so much for their community,” said Theresa Caparreli, Executive Director of Bergen County Habitat for Humanity.

Throughout the construction and renovation of the pantry, Franciscan remained open and continued to serve the nearly 800 families and 4000 individuals that come through their doors every month. The improvements made at the food pantry will help FCDC continue to meet the needs of the community they see every day and continue serving the residents of Fairview with the dignity and respect that they deserve.

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