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IV Vitamin Therapy in Leonia, NJ

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If you're like most adults, your parents probably loaded you up with vitamin C whenever you had the sniffles or a cold. Your younger self might not have believed it worked, but as it turns out, your parents were onto something. According to doctors, vitamin C is one of the most important vitamins to consume. It might not be the cure-all for the common cold, but it absolutely helps maintain your immune system so you can fight the cold quicker. Also known as ascorbic acid, vitamin C also protects your body from prenatal health issues, cardiovascular problems, eye diseases, and even wrinkly skin.

When your body lacks vitamin C for a long time, you're sure to notice. Though vitamin C deficiency is relatively rare in the U.S., adults who go long periods without it may get sick frequently and suffer from other immune system issues. In extreme cases, people may get scurvy, which causes a litany of issues like joint pain, bleeding gums, and depression.

Vitamin-C

B vitamins like riboflavin (B2), niacin (B3), folic acid (b9), and cobalamin (B12) play a crucial role in keeping you healthy and maintaining your overall wellbeing. If you want a healthier body, B vitamins are critical, as they are literally building blocks that help preserve your brain functionality, cell metabolism, and energy. For pregnant women, B vitamins in IV drips are especially important because they help your new baby's brain develop while in the womb. B vitamins have also been shown to prevent congenital disabilities. Plus, they help ease feelings of nausea, which is a big bonus for moms and dads alike.

When your body is vitamin B deficient, you're putting yourself at risk of many health problems, such as complications with pregnancy, nervous system disorders, amenia, and gastric cancers.

Vitamin-B

Like the other vitamins and nutrients on this page, magnesium plays an important part in your body's total health. As a cofactor or helper molecule, magnesium has a role in 600+ bodily functions, including protein formation, nerve function, gene function, muscle movement, and energy production. If you're having a stressful day or week, high-potency magnesium has been shown to have relaxation properties that help calm your nerves and muscles. Unfortunately, most Americans don't get enough magnesium in their diets.

When your body is magnesium deficient, you could be playing with fire. Magnesium deficiency has been linked to chronic health concerns like osteoporosis, diabetes, and even heart disease. If you're feeling unusually weak or suffering from irregular muscle cramps, a vitamin IV session from Juventee could be the solution you need.

Magnesium

Just about every health food and drink in the stores boasts high levels of antioxidants. That's great, but what are they? Antioxidants are substances shown to slow or prevent cell damage from free radicals. Free radicals are unstable molecules linked to inflammation, disease, and forms of cancer. According to the National Library of Medicine, antioxidants also act as hydrogen and electron donors, as well as enzyme inhibitors.

Most humans get some types of antioxidants naturally through eating and drinking. However, IV vitamin therapy is a much more effective way to fight back against free radicals with antioxidants. When your body lacks antioxidants, free radical production increases, which causes oxidative stress - a harmful situation linked to arthritis, cancers, strokes, and Parkinson's disease.

Antioxidants

Thankfully, Juventee's IV vitamin therapy in Leonia, NJ contains antioxidants that may scavenge and reduce the free radicals affecting your health.

Some additional vitamins and nutrients found in most IV vitamin therapies include:

  • Calcium
  • Amino Acids
  • Threonine
  • Arginine
  • Tryptophan
  • Vitamin E
  • Vitamin D
  • More

Treat Your Body Right with IV Vitamin Therapy from Juventee

If your goal is to nourish your body with nutrients and vitamins, Juventee's IV vitamin therapy in cityname, state is the key you need to unlock success. We believe that balance is key to your health and wellness, which is why our specialists employ the most innovative medical advances in our treatment options and products. Unlike other vitamin IV clinics, our focus is on providing you with a full range of health services to help you reach your full potential.

That way, you can satisfy your aesthetic, physical, and nutritional needs while positively impacting your emotional wellbeing too. If you're on the fence about getting healthy and re-discovering the joys of youth, contact our office today. It would be our pleasure to talk about your concerns and how our preventative, proactive treatments like IV vitamin therapy can help on your journey to health.

 Hormone Therapy Leonia, NJ

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At Shumi in Leonia, Sushi Senseis Hand You Their Masterworks

Some restaurants streak brilliantly across the sky, but burn out. A few manage to return like comets. Shumi is the latter.In 1986, master sushi chef Kunihiko “Ike” Aikasa opened the brilliant Shumi in Somerville, which he later sold. In 2017, Aikasa, with protégé David Seo, returned with Shumi Ridgewood, still a magnet for sushi connoisseurs. This February, they t...

Some restaurants streak brilliantly across the sky, but burn out. A few manage to return like comets. Shumi is the latter.

In 1986, master sushi chef Kunihiko “Ike” Aikasa opened the brilliant Shumi in Somerville, which he later sold. In 2017, Aikasa, with protégé David Seo, returned with Shumi Ridgewood, still a magnet for sushi connoisseurs. This February, they teamed as co-owners to create Shumi Leonia—serene in pale gray and white, the better to highlight the stellar food. (And the restaurant made our 2023 list of the 30 Best Restaurants in New Jersey.)

One dish in particular, fatty-tuna poke tartare, had me quivering like the pearls of salmon roe accenting this stunner: creamy Spanish tuna, plush sea urchin, Hokkaido, avocado, shreds of lettuce and scoop of sushi rice. Further elevating the flavors: a blissful, umami-lush mix-in sauce of aged soybean paste, shallots and garlic.

The tuna poke is a variation on a course served in the omakase room, where sushi savants happily pay $250 for 15-course meals made and presented by Aikasa and Seo.

“There’s an avid local audience for exquisitely high-quality, amazingly fresh fish,” says Seo, who was born in Seoul, South Korea, and grew up in Livingston and Edgewater. “I got to know and love this town when I went to Leonia High. I had a strong hunch this would work. Eastern Bergen County, and not just its Asian American communities, is extremely sushi friendly, with an eye for quality and innovation. And the tab reflects the sheer caliber of the meal.”

Shumi’s omakase seafood is “flown fresh into JFK that morning,” Seo says. “Most is from Japan, with tuna from Spain, salmon from Scotland, lobster from the North Atlantic, Dungeness crab and Kumamoto oysters from the Pacific Northwest, and blue point oysters from Long Island. Those don’t fly in. But the only fresher way to eat fish is on the boat.”

Following an early career in interior design, Seo, now 45, decided he wanted to “work amidst people and create beautiful, delicious sushi.”

He met Aikasa while running Japanese eateries at Newark Liberty International Airport. “Chef Ike was already a legend from his first Shumi in Somerville,” Seo says “He came into EWR as a consultant, took me on as an apprentice, and here we are. His legacy underlies everything I do.”

Behind the eight-seat omakase room’s marble sushi bar, the two senseis carve and dress every morsel of the omakase, a word usually translated as, “I leave it to you [the chef].” The meal includes a version of the tuna poke mentioned above, but with an additional dollop of precious sturgeon caviar. Bluefin tuna is sliced in front of you from a colossal, ruby-red hunk.

Each omakase course is rapidly dressed with the ideal garnish, whether salty anchovy, peppery shiso leaf, spicy jalapeño, or citrusy yuzu, and handed to the wide-eyed recipient. “Sushi is meant to be eaten as soon as it’s made,” notes Seo. “After the cool fish hits the warm rice, there’s a one-minute window of temperature and texture perfection.”

He adds with a chuckle, “Not that anyone here wants to wait.”

Tako salad on the main dining room menu. Photo: Cayla Zahoran

Vanishing just as fast are warm omakase dishes such as seafood chawanmushi custard, baked oyster with panko crumbs, a gyoza dumpling stuffed and topped with foie gras, and Miyazaki Wagyu beef, silken and miso marinated.

The menu in the 60-seat dining room is not as ethereal as the one-on-one omakase. (In my experience, no meal is.) But the dining room provides a plethora of pleasures, such as the East-meets-West tako salad, showcasing charry grilled octopus. Agaedashi tofu, a sushiya standard of battered, fried tofu in a briny broth, is profoundly flavorful, the tofu teasingly silken, yet meaty.

The dining room at Shumi. Photo: Cayla Zahoran

Seo’s traditional sushi and sashimi pieces are top-notch, his rolls tantalizing. Some rolls feature fish seared or tempura fried. The textures and flavors of the bewitching five-piece tempura lobster roll unfurl in the mouth: firm sushi rice, delicately crunchy panko batter, moist lobster, piquant scallion, briny salmon roe. I set aside the roll’s towering topper, a whole claw, as a final revel.

Seo’s artistry suffuses the entire menu. His salmon-mozzarella roll—yes, you read that right—combines raw Scottish salmon with red onion, jalapeño and shiso leaf on sushi rice, topped with mozzarella. The composition is flattened in a wooden box, in Osaka’s oshizushi style. Fleetingly baked, it’s cut into six pieces, drizzled with spicy mayo and eel sauce, and finished with fried onions on top. It’s quirky and captivating.

Salmon-mozzarella roll. Photo: Cayla Zahoran

Equally spirited is fatty tuna on crispy rice. Six little discs of rice, deep-fried until crackly, each bearing a scoop of diced fatty tuna seared in sweet miso, are arranged like numbers on a clock. “I made this for Leonia,” he says. “Many of our diners grew up in Korean and Japanese cultures, which value harmony in all things, especially food and design.”

A creamy panna cotta is the sole dessert. The omakase room’s is made with Jersey strawberries drizzled with strawberry honey. The dining room serves matcha green tea panna cotta with sugary red beans. To me, the tuna poke tartare would make a euphoric finale, like a galactic cataclysm captured by the Webb telescope. Next time my orbit crosses Comet Shumi’s, I’ll save the poke tartare for last.

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Capodagli sues to build 120 units in North Jersey

A New Jersey developer is attempting to leverage the legal system and an affordable housing provision to override a borough’s opposition to a project.CPC Aquista filed a builder’s remedy suit late last month against the borough of Leonia and its planning board, NorthJersey.com reported; in minutes from another township, CPC Aquista is...

A New Jersey developer is attempting to leverage the legal system and an affordable housing provision to override a borough’s opposition to a project.

CPC Aquista filed a builder’s remedy suit late last month against the borough of Leonia and its planning board, NorthJersey.com reported; in minutes from another township, CPC Aquista is identified as an affiliate of Linden-based Capodagli Property Company.

The lawsuit alleges Leonia hasn’t met its affordable housing obligations and the developer should therefore be able to build its multifamily project with an affordable housing component. The 120-unit project calls for the redevelopment of two homes at 256 and 266 Grand Avenue, which CPC is in contract to purchase. Fifteen percent of the units would be affordable.

Leonia is formulating its own plan to redevelop Grand Avenue and its surrounding area. The two properties in question are in Leonia’s plan, which was prepared by H2M. The plan calls for the sites to have age-restricted multifamily housing, but caps the height of buildings at three stories.

The properties in the redevelopment zone have not been condemned and therefore can’t be acquired by the borough through eminent domain.

In a joint statement, Leonia’s mayor and planning board chair said the developer was using the lawsuit as a way to force through its proposal. They added that CPC’s proposal was “an exponential overdevelopment and not at all in keeping with the character of the community.”

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Going back to the 1970s, court decisions in the state have mandated municipalities to create a “fair share” of affordable housing and get approval from the government on an affordable housing plan. Following a ruling in 2015, towns have negotiated these plans with the Fair Share Housing Center before the state Supreme Court.

CPC’s lawsuit claims Leonia’s laws and master plan fail to create enough affordable housing units. The borough’s officials rebutted the claim, saying it has adopted affordable housing plans and that the borough has been certified twice “as having satisfied its affordable housing obligations.”

Read more

Tri-State

State senator looks to slow New Jersey development boom

That point of contention is a key part of the lawsuit. Builder’s remedy is a legal provision that allows developers to bypass local zoning to boost a state’s affordable housing production. While it has existed in New Jersey for decades, it has become more prominent in the fight between developers and municipalities in California.

Holden Walter-Warner

State of the Program: Palisades Park/Leonia football building up roster under new coach

On the field, Jon Koonce has locked up the title as the youngest head football coach in North Jersey.Off it, he is in the running for the most persuasive.Koonce, 27, has tapped into his experience as a college football recruiter to build up the roster in his first season leading Palisades Park/Leonia. The Tigers have gone from 25 to 35 players this summer and hope to add a few more with late signups or new freshmen.The sales pitch doesn't sound easy on the surface. The Tigers have won eight games over the ...

On the field, Jon Koonce has locked up the title as the youngest head football coach in North Jersey.

Off it, he is in the running for the most persuasive.

Koonce, 27, has tapped into his experience as a college football recruiter to build up the roster in his first season leading Palisades Park/Leonia. The Tigers have gone from 25 to 35 players this summer and hope to add a few more with late signups or new freshmen.

The sales pitch doesn't sound easy on the surface. The Tigers have won eight games over the last four years and hold 7 a.m. summer practices to accommodate athletes who work at the town pool.

The solution for Koonce is to go "everywhere and anywhere" from the hallway to the basketball court and take a divide-and-conquer approach. He has three assistants in the Leonia school system who cover that district, and Koonce can focus on Palisades Park as a history teacher at the school.

"We all did a great job of going out and getting kids to buy what we're selling," Koonce said. "I think now they're starting to see that."

Koonce comes back to Bergen County after filling a number of roles at his alma mater, Montclair State. He spent the last five years as the school's tight ends coach.

The Tigers are coming off a 3-4 season in the NJIC Union Division and need to replace most of the skill group on offense. The big plus this year is having a band of about 10 to 15 seniors. Lineman SJ Mun and wide receiver/safety Elijah Perez will set the tone as veterans.

"It's quite a large class this year," Koonce said. "That core of guys is a great group of kids. They're really going to help us steer the ship."

STATE OF THE PROGRAM:Inside look at every HS football team in North Jersey

The tradition

Palisades Park/Leonia starts its 24th season as the oldest of the four football co-ops in Bergen County. The program has made three playoff trips since then and last had a winning season in 2013.

Palisades Park won one sectional title as a single entity and Leonia claimed three in the pre-playoff era.

Koonce was a two-way lineman at Cliffside Park before the Red Raiders merged with Ridgefield. He re-connected with his high school program by setting up a joint practice, a scrimmage and a 7-on-7 with Red Raiders coach and Pal Park alum Tom Mandile.

"I'm so grateful that they're right next to us," Koonce said. "It's a great resource for both us."

The challenge

Koonce will be the program's seventh coach in the last 10 seasons. He said the biggest challenge is to change the culture and he defines his as one built on confidence and accountability.

This year, the Tigers have the obstacle of replacing their top running back and two-year quarterback.

"We have to continue to teach the kids good habits and constantly get them to do the right things," Koonce said. "Not falling back into [the mindset] that I'm tired today or having a bad day. Getting them to understand that consistency is the key to life."

Expectations

Moving to the NJIC Union Division, designed for programs struggling with participation to play against similar opponents, has created a spark for the Tigers. The co-op has won three games in back-to-back seasons after scuffling through a 3-31 stretch.

The goal in 2023 is to aim much higher.

"The goals are to make the [Union] playoffs," Koonce said. "The kids are really excited. They are chomping at the bit. I think they recognize that there's some talent on our field."

2023 schedule

Sept. 7: vs. Elmwood Park

Sept. 14: at Weehawken

Sept. 22: at Manchester

Sept. 28: vs. Harrison

Oct. 5: at Bogota

Oct. 12: TBD (home)

Oct. 19: TBD (away)

Developer sues Leonia in effort to build apartment building where two homes now sit

3-minute read0:000:53ADLEONIA — A developer is suing the borough and its Planning Board for the right to build a large apartment building, with some units set aside for low-income families, where two houses now sit on Grand Avenue.CPC Aquista, LLC, says in the complaint that Leonia has failed to meet its affordable housing obligations. The developer filed the builder’s remedy suit in state Superior Court in Hackensack late last month and is seeking to build multifamily housing in exchange for creati...

3-minute read

LEONIA — A developer is suing the borough and its Planning Board for the right to build a large apartment building, with some units set aside for low-income families, where two houses now sit on Grand Avenue.

CPC Aquista, LLC, says in the complaint that Leonia has failed to meet its affordable housing obligations. The developer filed the builder’s remedy suit in state Superior Court in Hackensack late last month and is seeking to build multifamily housing in exchange for creating affordable units.

The developer is under contract to purchase two homes near Station Parkway at 256 and 266 Grand Ave., according to the suit. The company plans to build a 120-unit building at the site, with 15% of the apartments set aside for low- and moderate-income housing.

The suit comes as the borough is considering a plan to redevelop Grand Avenue and the surrounding area. The Planning Board is meeting Tuesday at 7:30 p.m. in Leonia Public Library to discuss a draft plan to overhaul the borough’s downtown.

The two properties mentioned in the lawsuit are included in the plan, which was prepared for the borough by the planning firm H2M.

“It is clear that the developer has created this lawsuit solely in an attempt to force the borough to approve a plan for development of a parcel of land on Grand Avenue between Maple Street and Station Parkway,” Mayor Judah Zeigler and Planning Board Chairman Michael DeGidio said in a joint statement.

The draft redevelopment plan calls for that stretch of Grand Avenue to be designated for age-restricted multifamily buildings, with a maximum height of three stories or 38 feet.

The developer’s plan for the 120-unit building would be “an exponential overdevelopment and not at all in keeping with the character of the community,” Zeigler and DeGidio said.

Daniel Steinhagen, the Planning Board attorney, declined to comment on the suit but said the redevelopment plan will not be finished on Tuesday, “as the board intends to give feedback so that revisions can be made.”

The redevelopment area described in the 74-page plan encompasses about 70 acres bounded by the NJ Transit railroad right of way to the west, Station Parkway to the south, Leonia High School to the north, and an irregular boundary along properties on Grand Avenue and Fort Lee Road to the east.

The 105 properties in the area in need of redevelopment — a mix of small-scale residential, mixed-use buildings, single-story commercial buildings, offices and parking lots — are non-condemnation properties and cannot be acquired by eminent domain.

The plan seeks to revitalize the area by “creating an economically vibrant community” that would capitalize on its proximity to the proposed light rail extension, which if it is built would add a Leonia station and expand residents' access to New York City.

The addition of new housing and businesses to the area “will activate the streets and create a sense of place within the community, diversify housing stock in the borough, assist it in meeting its affordable housing obligation, create an increase in bus and rail ridership, and improve transportation circulation and safety,” the plan reads.

Beginning in 1975, a series of state Supreme Court cases ruled that municipalities must zone to create a "fair share" of affordable housing for low- and moderate-income families. A now-defunct state agency, the Council on Affordable Housing, was created to approve each municipality's affordable housing plan.

But in 2015, the state Supreme Court declared that the council was non-functioning after it failed to adopt updated affordable housing quotas and rules, and the court essentially dismantled the agency. Since then, towns have negotiated in Superior Court with the nonprofit Fair Share Housing Center on settlements dictating the construction of affordable housing.

The developer, CPC Aquista, argues in the suit that Leonia’s laws and master plan “do not create sufficient opportunities for construction of safe, decent housing affordable to low- and moderate-income households.”

But in their statement, Zeigler and DeGidio said Leonia has “taken substantive steps to address" its affordable housing obligation, including adopting a Housing Element and Fair Share plan and ordinances promoting affordable housing in the borough.

The borough has twice been certified “as having satisfied its affordable housing obligations,” they said.

More:Here's how much NJ home prices have really increased since COVID

The lawsuit claims the developer has “sought to develop the property in good faith and has presented plans to the borough for multi-family housing on its property, but the plans have not been approved.”

But Zeigler and DeGidio said the developer has yet to submit an application to the Planning Board, and they questioned “the basis for the meritless allegations contained in the complaint.”

'Athens of the East': Leonia was once a community teeming with artists

To understand Leonia's cultural history, consider the oversized north-facing windows found in local Dutch farmhouses.Beyond them once sat dozens of artists who descended on Leonia starting in the late 1800s. Then a backwater, Leonia offered artists refuge, inspiration and old farmhouses with northern exposures that provided the indirect sunlight coveted by painters for its cool consistency and absence of glare.It also provided access to New York City, which was teeming with economic opportunity. Apart from trains...

To understand Leonia's cultural history, consider the oversized north-facing windows found in local Dutch farmhouses.

Beyond them once sat dozens of artists who descended on Leonia starting in the late 1800s. Then a backwater, Leonia offered artists refuge, inspiration and old farmhouses with northern exposures that provided the indirect sunlight coveted by painters for its cool consistency and absence of glare.

It also provided access to New York City, which was teeming with economic opportunity. Apart from trains to Manhattan's Grand Central Terminal, trolleys regularly ran from Hillside Avenue to the Edgewater ferry docks.

Across three generations, more than 170 artists called Leonia home, said Paul Mattingly, a professor emeritus of history at New York University. Mattingly, who wrote 2019's "An American Art Colony" about Leonia, lived on Brook Terrace until 1984.

Leonia art colony was fully integrated into the greater community. On weekends, artists would welcome their neighbors in for "studio tours," art lessons and occasional spot sales. On weekdays, the artists would frequent local businesses and involve themselves in community politics.

Peter Newell, one of two artists who would establish the Leonia colony's foundation, served as chairman of the town's Board of Health. Nationally known for his illustrations in Harper's Magazine, Newell was similar to many of his fellow Leonia-based artists and their neighbors. He was a modern professional, rather than an eccentric recluse in a paint-spattered smock.

Newell and Ilana Rado West, the second of the two original colony artists, welcomed extended family and friends to Leonia. West rented out her home's north-facing rooms as artists' studios when the family needed money. Other artists likewise converted empty barns and carriage houses to studios. Lessons were taught under Palladian windows in old Dutch farmhouses. Jobs were sourced and shared.

"Most of these artists took on students to pay the bills," Mattingly said. "People became professional artists because they were born in the town."

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At the outset, the colony proved alluring to artists seeking to move from easel art into commercial realms. Officials at New York City universities, publishing houses and corporations were likewise attracted by the colony's reputation.

Long before it attracted Nobel Prize winners including Enrico Fermi and Willard Libby, Leonia had been dubbed the "Athens of the East." That 1890s marketing campaign of the Leonia Heights Land Company sought to lure professors at Columbia University and other high-culture academics to the town. Between 1900 and 1930, Leonia's population increased sixfold, from 800 to 5,350 people. The vast majority were college-educated.

For their part, Newell, West and others helped form a web of informal mentorships among Leonia's potters, lithographers and illustrators, Mattingly said.

Many of the early members of the colony came from the Midwest: Nebraska, Iowa and South Dakota. "Museums there are filled with Leonia stuff," Mattingly said. "It's not small-time people."

The colony reached its peak of more than 90 artists following World War I and the arrival of Harvey Dunn at his new home at Grand Avenue and Christie Street. Dunn, a South Dakotan whose illustrations were often featured in Collier's Weekly, Scribner's Magazine and The Saturday Evening Post, was the Norman Rockwell of New Jersey, Mattingly said.

"He was the man," Mattingly added. "He was actually better known than Norman Rockwell before Norman Rockwell became Norman Rockwell."

A student of legendary American illustrator Howard Pyle, Dunn teamed with artist Charles Chapman of Sylvan Avenue to open the Leonia School of Illustration in the summer of 1914. The school welcomed a flood of new talent. Many were artists from the Art Students League in Manhattan, where Dunn "taught," though he famously said, "Art cannot be taught, any more than life can be taught."

A creative spirit consumed the town. In 1919, the Players Guild of Leonia set up in the town's Civil War Drill Hall. The guild is the oldest community theater group in New Jersey. "It was a country town coming together around the art," Mattingly said.

Though artists and the colony's history remained part of the community fabric after World War II, the colony itself had disintegrated. Leonia residents' interest in and the fine arts nonetheless permeates the town today, Mattingly saidstill a place that attracts artists.

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