Hormone Replacement Therapy Clinic in Tenafly, NJ | Juventee Medical Spa

HRT -Hormone Replacement Therapy Clinic in Tenafly, NJ.

Is HRT for Women the Right Answer?

To live a healthy life, hormone stability is very important for women. That's where the beauty of HRT treatments for women begins to shine because it balances hormones that would otherwise be altered due to menopause.

HRT treatments for women represent a revolutionary step toward living life without the pitfalls of old age. However, at Juventee, we understand that no two women, and by proxy, patients, are the same. That's why our team of doctors and specialists provide personalized treatment options for women, combining holistic treatment, nutrition, fitness plans, and more to supplement our HRT treatments.

Is HRT the answer if you feel exhausted, overweight, and moody? That's the million-dollar question that we're asked almost every day. And to be honest, it's hard to say without a comprehensive exam by an HRT expert at Juventee. What we can say is that when a woman's hormones are better balanced during menopause, she has a much better chance of enjoying life without the crippling symptoms that other women feel.

At Juventee, helping women reclaim their vitality and love of life is our top priority. While some HRT clinics see patients as nothing more than a means to make money, our team is cut from a different cloth.

A New Youthful You Awaits at Juventee

If you are considering HRT treatments for women in Tenafly, NJ, you need a team of hormone replacement experts by your side. At Juventee, our knowledgeable HRT doctors are ready to help. Our team will answer your initial questions, conduct necessary testing, and craft a customized program designed to alleviate the challenges you're facing as a woman going through menopause.

With a healthy diet, exercise, positive life choices, and hormone replacement therapy, unveiling the new "you" is easier than you might think. Contact our office today to get started on your journey to optimal health and well-being.

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Latest News in Tenafly, NJ

New Jersey teachers charged with possession of child sexual abuse material

TENAFLY, N.J. (PIX11) — An investigation revealed that two New Jersey teachers used the internet to view, download, and possess items depicting nude and or sexually explicit prepubescent and pubescent children, according to authorities.They are a father and son pair of teachers at Midland School No. 1, the only public K-8 school in this small district. Both face a charge of second-degree possession of child pornography.Rochelle Park parents and residents reacted Thursday to the news. “My daughter is 12, my son is 8....

TENAFLY, N.J. (PIX11) — An investigation revealed that two New Jersey teachers used the internet to view, download, and possess items depicting nude and or sexually explicit prepubescent and pubescent children, according to authorities.

They are a father and son pair of teachers at Midland School No. 1, the only public K-8 school in this small district. Both face a charge of second-degree possession of child pornography.

Rochelle Park parents and residents reacted Thursday to the news. “My daughter is 12, my son is 8. I am horrified about it,” said Jane.

Jeffrey Grossman, 65, is a staff teacher. His 24-year-old son Steven Grossman is a substitute teacher.

Bergen County prosecutors say both men, who live not far away in Tenafly, viewed or downloaded more than 1,000 digital files depicting nude and or sexually explicit prepubescent and pubescent children.

Both Grossmans have since been released from custody and granted home confinement until their trial. This was against the wishes of the Bergen County Prosecutor’s Office, which was not available to comment on this story.

PIX11 News was able to speak with the elder Grossman’s wife on the phone Thursday.

“It is a very difficult time for our family. Please understand we are trying to manage as best we can. I am happy to say I love my husband, I love my son, and we are going to support one another,” the wife said.

But other residents were still in shock.

“My fiancé is from this area; her whole family is from this area. For them it really hit hard,” said John.

Rochelle Park school officials recently sent a letter to parents, which reads, in part: “The board has immediately suspended both employees and directed them that they are prohibited from coming to the school for any reason and are prohibited from contacting any student or staff.”

Jeffrey Grossman is not just an educator of young children. He is also the president of the borough council in Tenafly.

“I was shocked to learn of the arrest of our borough council president,” Tenafly Mayor Mark Zinna said. “I think it is in the best interest of the borough that Mr. Grossman step down in order for the people’s business to continue uninterrupted, and without distraction.”

PIX11 News was able to get some more specific information from prosecutors about what their search warrant turned up on the elder Grossman’s devices. Prosecutors said they found more than 17,000 photos and videos of child pornography on his devices.

Center for Mandarin Learning to open in North Jersey as interest in Chinese dialect grows

Mandarin Chinese language learning has been growing in the United States, especially among young people with immersion programs for K-12 students increasing an average of 16% a year for the last decade.In Tenafly, the Bergen Chinese School, which has been teaching children and adults to read, write and speak Mandarin since 1972, will c...

Mandarin Chinese language learning has been growing in the United States, especially among young people with immersion programs for K-12 students increasing an average of 16% a year for the last decade.

In Tenafly, the Bergen Chinese School, which has been teaching children and adults to read, write and speak Mandarin since 1972, will contribute to that growth this weekend with the opening of the school's Taiwan Center for Mandarin Learning.

Mandarin is a form of Chinese that is the official language of mainland China and Taiwan. Interest in Mandarin has surged along with the growth in the Asian-American population in the U.S. and China's rise as a global economic superpower.

The center, which is actually a program that is a more immersive version of the school's current adult classes, will host a grand opening on Sunday at Tenafly High School at 3 p.m. That's where the Bergen Chinese School has operated since 2018 after previously being based in Hackensack.

Raymond Chung, the principal of the Bergen Chinese School, said while currently the school offers classes where adults learn Mandarin through conversation, the new center will offer something more extensive.

"Now, we're offering a more structured program for adults over 18," Chung said. "With the Taiwan Center, instead of just coming together for conversation, there's also more emphasis on the technical aspects of the language like reading and writing."

He said the adult conversation classes, which are usually an hour are now three hours in this new center/program. Classes had officially started in the center on March 5 and will run until June 11, meeting every Sunday from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. in three sessions. The center will then resume in the fall when the high school is open for the school year.

The new center was made possible by a grant from the Overseas Community Affairs Council of the Republic of China, the formal name of Taiwan. There are 66 of these centers in the U.S. and Europe with more than 50 of them in the U.S. including 5 five in New Jersey.

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Chung said the center is offering learning for those want to be more proficient in the language to communicate with loved ones who speak only Mandarin.

New Jersey has one of the largest Chinese-American populations in the country, with 168,000 residents of Chinese descent, according to U.S. Census figures. Overall, Asian Americans are the fastest-growing ethnic group in the state, accounting for 10% of New Jersey's 9 million-plus population, according to 2020 census.

Chung said the grand opening will feature a traditional fan dance and the unveiling of a plaque commemorating the new center. A ribbon-cutting ceremony will include representatives from the Taiwan Economic and Cultural Office and Tenafly Mayor Mark Zinna.

While the new program, which has a tuition of $400 and additional costs for registration and materials, has already begun, people can still attend by applying at the school's website at bergenchineseschool.org.

Ricardo Kaulessar is a culture reporter for the USA TODAY Network's Atlantic Region How We Live team. For unlimited access to the most important news, please subscribe or activate your digital account today.

Email: [email protected]

Twitter: @ricardokaul

NJ Spotlight News | Clip | Tenafly family of Hamas hostage speaks about ordeal

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At a vigil in Tenafly on Wednesday night, the family of Edan Alexander pleaded for the release of their son. The 19-year-old is being held hostage by Hamas along with more than 200 other Israeli and American Jews. Alexander, who was born in Tel Aviv and grew up in New Jersey, was serving with the Israel Defense Forces near the Gaza Strip when Hamas carried out its unprecedented assault on Oct. 7.

For half-century, Bergen group's free swim sessions have eased burden for MS patients

TENAFLY — Every Wednesday since 1976, a group of swimmers has gathered in a pool here to make the burdens of multiple sclerosis a little lighter.For Bergenfield's Christine Kochell, the weekly trip offers a respite from the neurological disease that has numbed her "from her legs down."“My l...

TENAFLY — Every Wednesday since 1976, a group of swimmers has gathered in a pool here to make the burdens of multiple sclerosis a little lighter.

For Bergenfield's Christine Kochell, the weekly trip offers a respite from the neurological disease that has numbed her "from her legs down."

“My legs are weak, and I have to use a walker or wheelchair for the distance,” Kochell said Wednesday. “Coming here allows me to feel human. I can go in the water and use my legs like I used to use my legs. It just gives you that feeling of normalcy that I can't get on dry land. I can move my legs like you would think nothing was wrong with me."

She’s been coming to the Kaplen Jewish Community Center on the Palisades for that feeling for seven years.

The Bergen County chapter of the National Council of Jewish Women has been hosting the swimming program since local member Ruth Cowan started it 47 years ago. It's the only free, volunteer-run "swim-in" for MS patients in the country, according to the council.

Anyone with MS can attend the hourlong sessions, as long as they have the approval of a doctor and the program’s physical therapist, Ava Silverstein.

Silverstein, who volunteers her time, leads attendees through group activities and spends about 15 minutes with each swimmer giving them personalized exercise routines.

“When they're in the water they can move more freely than they can walking around outside of the pool,” Silverstein said.

MS is the “most common disabling neurological disease of young adults," with symptoms that generally begin appearing between the ages of 20 and 40, according to the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke. The condition affects the central nervous system and causes a range of symptoms, from muscle weakness to spasticity to pain and depression. There is no cure, though treatments are available to help manage symptoms and improve quality of life.

Aquatic therapy helps by providing a low-impact setting where people can strengthen muscles and increase their range of motion, balance and coordination, according to the National MS Society.

Other benefits are more emotional and spiritual. On Wednesday, laughter and conversation echoed around the 25-meter indoor pool, which was rigged with a large plastic ladder and a lift to help people with limited mobility get in and out of the water.

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“This is an outing — coming to the program," Silverstein said. "They want to socialize and be around other people, view other MS clients and share the same concerns and information."

Stress, anxiety and depression are common among people with MS. But at least for one afternoon a week, the swimmers can smile.

Barbara Lightbody of Cresskill has been volunteering with the program for over 20 years.

“I had just retired from my computer programming job and I saw an article in the local paper that said they needed swimming volunteers. I said I have to go try this, and 20 years later it's still just what I want to do on Wednesdays,” Lightbody said, adding that she had “goosebumps” thinking about it.

Budget boost:NJ plans $165M boost to staffing at group homes, day programs for people with disabilities

The volunteers “are a big family,” she said. They help people get out of their cars in the parking lot and then change into bathing suits. They stay with their swimmers during the session. Each has at least one volunteer with them in the pool.

Sometimes it’s a small group of just five people who make it to the 1 o’clock sessions, and sometimes the group swells to 10 or 15, said Elizabeth Halverstam, who heads the local communications committee for the National Council of Jewish Women.

But one thing is for sure: Those who take part leave happy. Joan Orenstein is a certified trainer who helps in the pool and said she looks forward to Wednesdays.

“It just really makes you feel good when you leave that you did something really nice, and you had a good time doing it," she said.

The program, which has worked with hundreds of MS clients through the years, is looking for more volunteers and swimmers. For further information, email: [email protected].

Gene Myers covers disability and mental health for NorthJersey.com and the USA TODAY Network. For unlimited access to the most important news from your local community, please subscribe or activate your digital account today.

Boys swimming: No. 10 Tenafly completes three-peat, wins North 1, Group B title

Prior to the arrival of this year’s senior class, Tenafly had just one sectional title in program history.Flash forward four years, and the program has just secured its third consecutive trip to the Public B state tournament.Powered by nine first-place finishes and dominant performances from stars such as Aaron Baltaytis and Hayoung Choe, Tenafly, No. 10 in NJ.com’s Top 20, cruised to a 99-71 victory over Northern Highlands in the North 1, Group B title . The victory marks Tenafly’s third consecutive sectional...

Prior to the arrival of this year’s senior class, Tenafly had just one sectional title in program history.

Flash forward four years, and the program has just secured its third consecutive trip to the Public B state tournament.

Powered by nine first-place finishes and dominant performances from stars such as Aaron Baltaytis and Hayoung Choe, Tenafly, No. 10 in NJ.com’s Top 20, cruised to a 99-71 victory over Northern Highlands in the North 1, Group B title . The victory marks Tenafly’s third consecutive sectional title and its fourth overall.

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“It’s exciting,” head coach Matthew White said in regard to winning a third consecutive sectional title. “We had some swimmers in different events, and unfortunately we had some swimmers that weren’t here today. But all of our swimmers bought into [competing] in different events.”

We had [Baltaytis] swimming the 200 freestyle, [Choe] swimming the 200 IM, events that they don’t normally swim but we knew stacking up we had to swim [well] in those events. Northern Highlands is a really quick team and we didn’t take them for granted.”

Tenafly was short-handed today, with top swimmers such as Jason Yi, Edward Kim, Roy Dafinoiu all missing out from today’s meet.

But given the depth that Tenafly has from top to bottom, particularly in the relays, White was confident that his team would be able to make up for those losses.

“I knew kind of going in that we’d get those first-place finishes,” White said. “We knew that we would stack up decently well and score a lot of depth points kind of knowing what Northern Highlands has. And we knew that with certain events we were going to capitalize on, and I hope that that same trend is able to continue into the state tournament.”

Baltaytis showcased why he is one of the top swimmers in the state, posting victories in the 200 free [1:42.72] and 100 fly [50.89], and also earning a victory in the 400 freestyle relay, which also included Kyle Lee, Ellis Tritter, and Choe.

“I was going for Hudson Tritter school record in the 200 freestyle which was around 1:40, but I ended up getting 1:42.72,” Baltaytis said. “It would’ve been nice to get, but I’ll take this time at a high school meet especially. I can’t complain about getting the win in the 100 fly as well and the relays were really fun.”

But it wasn’t just Baltaytis who helped pick up the slack for some of the holes in Tenafly’s lineup, stars such as Andrew Lee and Hayoung Choe posted two individual victories themselves. Lee won the 50 free in 22.37, while also taking home the breaststroke in 1:01.67.

Baltaytis, Choe, and Yi are three notable members of a stacked senior class for Tenafly, who have been the driving forces behind the program resurgence after a string of tough losses in the sectional tournament throughout the late 2010s.

“I think we have something really special,” Baltaytis said in regard to the team’s senior class. “We couldn’t quite cross that barrier for a good couple of years of winning a sectional championship, and then once the three of us came on [Baltaytis, Yi, and Choe], we won three in a row, which is really nice.

Tenafly’s next challenge will be finally getting over the hump in the Group B state tournament, where they’ve lost in the semifinals in its last two postseason runs (excluding the 2020 season). Last season, Princeton took advantage of a DQ by Tenafly late in the meet to earn an 87-83 victory in the Group B semifinals.

White also expects to have a fully healthy roster for its Group B semifinal matchup.

“We still expecting to go pretty far in the team state tournament,” White said. “We’ll see what ends up happening. We have to take things one meet at a time. Last year [group semifinal] was tough for us. But we’re ready to go. They’re excited for what’s left in the season.”

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Corey Annan may be reached at @coreyannan360

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