Hormone Replacement Therapy Clinic in Teaneck, NJ | Juventee Medical Spa

HRT -Hormone Replacement Therapy Clinic in Teaneck, NJ.

Is HRT for Women the Right Answer?

To live a healthy life, hormone stability is very important for women. That's where the beauty of HRT treatments for women begins to shine because it balances hormones that would otherwise be altered due to menopause.

HRT treatments for women represent a revolutionary step toward living life without the pitfalls of old age. However, at Juventee, we understand that no two women, and by proxy, patients, are the same. That's why our team of doctors and specialists provide personalized treatment options for women, combining holistic treatment, nutrition, fitness plans, and more to supplement our HRT treatments.

Is HRT the answer if you feel exhausted, overweight, and moody? That's the million-dollar question that we're asked almost every day. And to be honest, it's hard to say without a comprehensive exam by an HRT expert at Juventee. What we can say is that when a woman's hormones are better balanced during menopause, she has a much better chance of enjoying life without the crippling symptoms that other women feel.

At Juventee, helping women reclaim their vitality and love of life is our top priority. While some HRT clinics see patients as nothing more than a means to make money, our team is cut from a different cloth.

A New Youthful You Awaits at Juventee

If you are considering HRT treatments for women in Teaneck, NJ, you need a team of hormone replacement experts by your side. At Juventee, our knowledgeable HRT doctors are ready to help. Our team will answer your initial questions, conduct necessary testing, and craft a customized program designed to alleviate the challenges you're facing as a woman going through menopause.

With a healthy diet, exercise, positive life choices, and hormone replacement therapy, unveiling the new "you" is easier than you might think. Contact our office today to get started on your journey to optimal health and well-being.

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Bischoff's, Teaneck's 90-year-old ice cream shop, is closing permanently once again

Bischoff's, the homey, old-school, near-90-year-old ice cream shop in Teaneck, is closing permanently — again.After giving the five-generation-long family-owned soda fountain, which closed at the end of last year only to reopen four months later, a second chance, owner Steve Mather and his mother, Anita, decided to close the shop for good.The shop announced the closing on its Instagram a...

Bischoff's, the homey, old-school, near-90-year-old ice cream shop in Teaneck, is closing permanently — again.

After giving the five-generation-long family-owned soda fountain, which closed at the end of last year only to reopen four months later, a second chance, owner Steve Mather and his mother, Anita, decided to close the shop for good.

The shop announced the closing on its Instagram and Facebook pages Tuesday.

"We can't begin to express how painful this decision was for us," the post said. "Five generations of our family have treasured our role in the community. Bischoff's has been everything to us. YOU have been everything to us. — every kid who first tasted ice cream in our shop, every couple on a first date, everyone who came here for a celebration, or because they needed something sweet in a painful time."

Bischoff's was reborn on Memorial Day, this time as a summer pop-up, with the help of Rony Alvarado, chef of Rony's Rockin' Grill in Bergenfield, TJ Quinn and Edward Pierce, all Teaneck residents. They, avid fans of the ice cream shop, came up with the pop-up idea. Alvarado also served as Bischoff's new chef, offering sliders, fries and onion rings, all firsts for Bischoff's, because for the first time it had a fryer. The shop will stay open until Sept. 3.

The long-term plan was to launch a completely remodeled, full-service restaurant, sometime next spring, that would not only serve homemade ice cream and hot dogs but be a community space with local artwork, a stage for performances by local artists and more. The group set up a GoFundMe account to help raise funds to make their dream come true — and took donations at the store.

As of Tuesday morning, Quinn said, all the GoFundMe money raised — around $15,000 — was returned. As for the money raised in the shop? "Every penny will go to something in the community," Quinn said. "No one in the shop is going to profit from it."

"It’s really sad," Quinn continued. "We really thought it would work. It was a brutal decision. We knew it wasn’t going to be easy."

When Mather originally closed the store, he said the finances just weren't working. The shop implemented changes in hopes of improving business. It even began accepting credit cards in 2019. And then COVID-19 hit.

Mather could not be reached for comment on Tuesday.

When he announced the first closing weeks in advance, he was taken aback by the outpouring of love the shop received.

"I always knew people loved it, but maybe I didn’t understand just how much," he told The Record. "I mean I didn't think that people would wait three hours in line for two pints of ice cream — and do that in the rain."

The people came out again when the shop reopened, Quinn said, but it just wasn't enough to sustain a business long term.

"There was great support," Quinn said. "But ice cream is not a cheap thing to make, not when you are trying to do it right and not when you want to pay your employees a decent rate."

"People love Bischoff’s," Alvarado said. "We wanted to do something totally different. We wanted to build a community center. We were going to have a coffee shop, do lots of work. We were going to have pastries. That involves a lot of money. It didn’t make sense money-wise." He added that the Mather family does not own the Cedar Lane building, making rent another expense.

The original Bischoff's was founded in Manhattan by Mather's great-grandfather, Albert Bischoff, in the 1890s. It moved to Teaneck 89 years ago and has been a cherished part of Teaneck ever since.

"There was always a sense of responsibility to the community," Quinn said. "It really is not just about the people in the store. Everyone knows what Bischoff's has meant to the town, and this is the hardest part."

Teaneck man ordered detained, hit with additional charges after fatal car crash

A Teaneck man accused of killing two of his passengers in an early morning single-car crash just over a week ago will remain in custody and now faces additional charges.Teddy Mejia, 32, appeared virtually Monday before state Superior Court Judge David Labib for his detention hearing from his room at Hackens...

A Teaneck man accused of killing two of his passengers in an early morning single-car crash just over a week ago will remain in custody and now faces additional charges.

Teddy Mejia, 32, appeared virtually Monday before state Superior Court Judge David Labib for his detention hearing from his room at Hackensack University Medical Center. The livestreamed video showed Mejia wearing a neck brace.

The crash occurred on Oct. 21 just after 2 a.m. on Teaneck Road. According to authorities, Mejia and his two passengers, 40-year-old Hasbrouck Heights resident Rudy Rosales Escobar and 29-year-old Englewood resident Alexander Cosme Curruchich, were found in the wreckage of a 2021 BMW M850i. Both Rosales Escobar and Cosme Curruchich were pronounced dead at the scene.

During the hearing, Chief Assistant Prosecutor Anthony Talarico told the court that the evidence showed "an extreme indifference to human life."

The Bergen County Prosecutor's Office announced additional charges against Mejia on Monday.

He is facing two counts of first-degree aggravated manslaughter, as well as second-degree vehicular homicide while in violation of driving while intoxicated and third-degree possession of a controlled dangerous substance.

If convicted, Mejia could face up to 60 years in prison and would be required to serve 85% of his sentence before he is eligible for parole.

Talarico said Mejia's blood alcohol level was 0.284, three times the legal limit, and a urine sample showed cocaine in his system. At the hearing, the prosecutor said receipts showed Mejia had eight drinks within a two-hour period, including five double Jameson's and three Coronas.

"That's enough to knock a normal person out," Talarico said.

Mejia was driving 106 mph just five seconds before the car veered off the road over a residential lawn and split a tree in half, causing the BMW to overturn and crash, Talarico said, noting that the speed limit was 35 mph.

Throughout his argument, Talarico pointed to multiple motor vehicle violations, saying Mejia "has a significant problem following the rules of the road" and posed a risk of serious harm to people in the community.

Mejia's attorney, Brian Neary, argued that the Prosecutor's Office was aware of the elevated blood alcohol level and could have inferred the excessive speed based on the damage to the car but brought the aggravated manslaughter complaint later.

He also said his client's driving record doesn't show an "aberrant" history to suggest he is "a menace on the roadway as a driver." Neary suggested the court release Mejia and require him to report to the court weekly and surrender his driver's license.

Talarico said Mejia disregarded a suspended license in the past, which Neary said occurred in 2016, and he didn't consider it a sufficient deterrent. Neary said Mejia's license was not suspended for driving reasons but for failure to pay an insurance surcharge.

"I would suggest we shouldn't conflate careless driving, reckless driving, with the suspension," Neary said.

Labib agreed with the state, saying there was "an increased risk" based on the number of years Mejia could face in prison. Labib also said he had a problem with taking Mejia's license because of the quantity of alcohol and drugs found in his system.

"His ability to think clearly, his ability to actually make a decision to not get into that car even if I took his license, is very questionable," Labib said. "And I still believe he poses a significant danger to the community."

Mejia can appeal the decision within seven days.

10 most expensive homes sold in Teaneck, Oct. 16-22

A house that sold for $2.2 million tops the list of the most expensive residential real estate sales in Teaneck in the past week.In total, 14 residential real estate sales were recorded in the area during the past week, with an average price of $670,536, $359 per square foot.The prices in the list below concern real estate sales where the title was recorded during the week of Oct. 16 even if the property may have been sold earlier.10. $450K, detached house at 80 Sherwood Ave.The property at 80 Sherwood Ave. in T...

A house that sold for $2.2 million tops the list of the most expensive residential real estate sales in Teaneck in the past week.

In total, 14 residential real estate sales were recorded in the area during the past week, with an average price of $670,536, $359 per square foot.

The prices in the list below concern real estate sales where the title was recorded during the week of Oct. 16 even if the property may have been sold earlier.

10. $450K, detached house at 80 Sherwood Ave.

The property at 80 Sherwood Ave. in Teaneck has new owners. The price was $450,000. The house was built in 1920 and has a living area of 1,284 square feet. The price per square foot is $350. The deal was finalized on Aug. 29.

9. $555K, single-family home at 71 Jasper Ave.

A sale has been finalized for the single-family residence at 71 Jasper Ave. in Teaneck. The price was $555,000 and the new owners took over the house in September. The house was built in 1940 and the living area totals 1,449 square feet. The price per square foot ended up at $383. The deal was finalized on Sep. 1.

8. $573K, single-family house at 29 E. Maple Street

The 1,840 square-foot single-family house at 29 E. Maple Street in Teaneck has been sold. The transfer of ownership was settled in September and the total purchase price was $572,500, $311 per square foot. The house was built in 1940. The deal was finalized on Sep. 11.

7. $581K, single-family residence at 91 Van Buskirk Road

The property at 91 Van Buskirk Road in Teaneck has new owners. The price was $581,000. The house was built in 1951 and has a living area of 1,332 square feet. The price per square foot is $436. The deal was finalized on Sep. 7.

6. $590K, single-family home at 1172 Margaret Street

The sale of the detached house at 1172 Margaret Street, Teaneck, has been finalized. The price was $590,000, and the house changed hands in September. The house was built in 1926 and has a living area of 1,434 square feet. The price per square foot was $411. The deal was finalized on Sep. 12.

5. $595K, detached house at 1130 Magnolia Road

The sale of the single family residence at 1130 Magnolia Road in Teaneck has been finalized. The price was $595,000, and the new owners took over the house in August. The house was built in 1938 and has a living area of 1,713 square feet. The price per square foot was $347. The deal was finalized on Aug. 25.

4. $750K, single-family house at 779 Washburn Street

The 2,563 square-foot single-family residence at 779 Washburn Street, Teaneck, has been sold. The transfer of ownership was settled in August and the total purchase price was $750,000, $293 per square foot. The house was built in 1954. The deal was finalized on Aug. 29.

3. $905K, single-family residence at 348 Winthrop Road

The property at 348 Winthrop Road in Teaneck has new owners. The price was $905,000. The house was built in 1933 and has a living area of 2,109 square feet. The price per square foot is $429. The deal was finalized on Aug. 25.

2. $906K, single-family home at 875 E. Lawn Drive

A sale has been finalized for the single-family home at 875 E. Lawn Drive in Teaneck. The price was $906,000 and the new owners took over the house in August. The house was built in 1958 and the living area totals 3,082 square feet. The price per square foot ended up at $294. The deal was finalized on Aug. 25.

1. $2.2 million, single-family house at 596 S. Forest Drive

The 5,911 square-foot single-family house at 596 S. Forest Drive, Teaneck, has been sold. The transfer of ownership was settled in August and the total purchase price was $2,150,000, $364 per square foot. The house was built in 1949. The deal was finalized on Aug. 28.

Real Estate Newswire is a service provided by United Robots, which uses machine learning to generate analysis of data from Propmix, an aggregator of national real-estate data.

Teaneck girls basketball pulls away from Old Tappan to win second straight sectional title

TEANECK — With a second straight North 1, Group 3 girls basketball title on the line, Teaneck was nearly flawless at the line.The No. 1 seed Highwaywomen made 14-of-16 free throws in the fourth quarter to close out a 59-46 victory over No. 2 Old Tappan in Saturday’s sectional final at Curtis March Court.Senior Erin Frazier made all 12 of her foul shots, including six in the final period. She and classmate Demi Simpson capped their careers by leading Teaneck (23-7) to its third sectional repeat all-tim...

TEANECK — With a second straight North 1, Group 3 girls basketball title on the line, Teaneck was nearly flawless at the line.

The No. 1 seed Highwaywomen made 14-of-16 free throws in the fourth quarter to close out a 59-46 victory over No. 2 Old Tappan in Saturday’s sectional final at Curtis March Court.

Senior Erin Frazier made all 12 of her foul shots, including six in the final period. She and classmate Demi Simpson capped their careers by leading Teaneck (23-7) to its third sectional repeat all-time.

The four-year letter-winners also helped their team finish 3-1 against their Big North National rival, including a Bergen County Tournament semifinal win.

“We were here last year – we knew what the sectional environment was going to be like,” Frazier said. “We’ve seen [Old Tappan], this was the fourth time, and we know how they are. So that’s why we kept we kept our composure.

“We’re not new to this.”

What it means

Teaneck advanced to Wednesday’s 7 p.m. NJSIAA Group 3 semifinal at Ramapo High School. Its opponent will be the winner of North 2, determined Saturday evening between Chatham and Colonia.

Old Tappan (22-7) played in its first sectional final since 2018, when it went on to win Group 3.

“Whenever you play a team four times, the last time is always the hardest, right?” Highwaywomen coach Brad Allen said.

Key sequence

In a 25-all game midway through the third quarter, Teaneck went on a 9-0 run. After Simpson made 1-of-2 at the line, the home team forced a turnover, and Frazier sank a pair of free throws after being fouled.

Less than a minute later, Imani McKenzie set up Simpson for a jumper, and freshman Leayana Dorville stole the ensuing inbounds pass and scored to prompt an Old Tappan time out. The Golden Knights got no closer than 5 the rest of the way.

“In the third quarter, we didn’t allow them across half court until three minutes to go,” Allen said. “Everybody did exactly what we told them to do at halftime, and it worked out really well.”

A lot on the line

In last month’s Bergen County championship final against Saddle River Day, Teaneck made less than 50 percent of its foul shots (10-for-21) in a three-point loss.

“We really beat ourselves that game,” Simpson admitted. “Free throws meant everything.”

Allen responded by having the team shoot “literally 200 a day, every day” at the free-throw line. There, the Highwaywomen finished 30-for-38 (79 percent) in the North 1, Group 3 final.

Game balls

► Frazier and Simpson combined for 29 points and 19 rebounds and made 8 of their team’s 15 steals.

► Teaneck sophomore Jill Carter contributed 14 points and made all four of her foul shots.

► Old Tappan senior Layla Giordano collected 18 points, 9 rebounds, 2 steals and 2 assists.

They said it

“She’s amazing to play with. This is what I’m going to cherish.” —Simpson on winning back-to-back sectional titles with her four-year teammate, Frazier

“Amazing. This is my favorite person ever.” —Frazier, on Simpson

“Last year, we were so happy to win the sectional, and we went to overtime [against Sparta]. Then we had a 24-hour turnaround. This time, we have a 72-hour turnaround, so we can get ready a little bit better.” —Allen

Teaneck High School promotes 29-year-old former player to head football coach

New Teaneck football coach Cekuan James doesn’t like the world "rebuild." He does like the word "toughness," though.“We never want to rebuild, we always want to reload,” James said Thursday night. “We want to build a tough culture here so that after every game we play, the other team walks off saying ‘that Teaneck team played tough'.”The 29-year-old was approved as the Highwaymen's new head football coach Wednesday night by the district’s board of educ...

New Teaneck football coach Cekuan James doesn’t like the world "rebuild." He does like the word "toughness," though.

“We never want to rebuild, we always want to reload,” James said Thursday night. “We want to build a tough culture here so that after every game we play, the other team walks off saying ‘that Teaneck team played tough'.”

The 29-year-old was approved as the Highwaymen's new head football coach Wednesday night by the district’s board of education. He’s been the team’s defensive coordinator the last two seasons, before that he was an assistant at Don Bosco.

James was born in the Bronx, but his parents moved him and his siblings to Teaneck just before he entered eighth grade. James calls his father, Cedric, a huge influence on his life and aspirations. The James family ran a youth organization in the Bronx and now Cedric oversees the Teaneck Junior Football program.

Cekuan (pronounced Say-kwon) was a two-sport standout at Teaneck, playing linebacker and wrestling before graduating in 2012. He went on to play college football at Kean before getting his bachelor’s degree and masters.

He started coaching in the Teaneck Junior Football program when he was 18 and he’s known some of the players on the 2024 Teaneck team for almost 10 years. James believes that type of consistency and continuity is the key to a program being successful.

“We have a staff that pays attention to details, that coaches hard, and we keep the main thing the main thing,” James said. “You’re the most confident when you’re sure about your assignment and know the right way to do things. Confidence breeds toughness, in my opinion, and the only way to get confidence is by doing the right thing over and over. That’s the bottom line here.”

Teaneck has spent the last two seasons in the Super Football Conference’s Ivy Division, set up for teams trying to grow their programs and stimulate interest. Teaneck went 7-4 each of the last two years under Harold Clark. The program will be back in a regular varsity division in 2024 and James believes the roster will have around 55-60 kids.

“We didn’t really know much about the Ivy Division when we first got to Teaneck, but we just knew we were going to practice hard and scout hard and prepare,” James said. “We knew the league was going to sharpen us and make us ready for the Group 3s, Group 4s and Group 5s of the world.”

James is currently a physical education teacher in the school district and said the plan is to move to a similar position in the high school.

Hackensack and Teaneck are scheduled to meet next Thanksgiving for the 90th time. Hackensack has won the last nine meetings. James notes that he went 3-1 in his career against the Comets as a player and is already looking forward to the day.

“It’s time to put in the work and get back to those numbers [when I played],” he said. “We have so much respect for the rivalry and we want to play our hardest to give the people in Hackensack and Teaneck a great game and come out with a win.”

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