Hormone Replacement Therapy Clinic in Rockleigh, NJ | Juventee Medical Spa

HRT -Hormone Replacement Therapy Clinic in Rockleigh, NJ.

Is HRT for Women the Right Answer?

To live a healthy life, hormone stability is very important for women. That's where the beauty of HRT treatments for women begins to shine because it balances hormones that would otherwise be altered due to menopause.

HRT treatments for women represent a revolutionary step toward living life without the pitfalls of old age. However, at Juventee, we understand that no two women, and by proxy, patients, are the same. That's why our team of doctors and specialists provide personalized treatment options for women, combining holistic treatment, nutrition, fitness plans, and more to supplement our HRT treatments.

Is HRT the answer if you feel exhausted, overweight, and moody? That's the million-dollar question that we're asked almost every day. And to be honest, it's hard to say without a comprehensive exam by an HRT expert at Juventee. What we can say is that when a woman's hormones are better balanced during menopause, she has a much better chance of enjoying life without the crippling symptoms that other women feel.

At Juventee, helping women reclaim their vitality and love of life is our top priority. While some HRT clinics see patients as nothing more than a means to make money, our team is cut from a different cloth.

A New Youthful You Awaits at Juventee

If you are considering HRT treatments for women in Rockleigh, NJ, you need a team of hormone replacement experts by your side. At Juventee, our knowledgeable HRT doctors are ready to help. Our team will answer your initial questions, conduct necessary testing, and craft a customized program designed to alleviate the challenges you're facing as a woman going through menopause.

With a healthy diet, exercise, positive life choices, and hormone replacement therapy, unveiling the new "you" is easier than you might think. Contact our office today to get started on your journey to optimal health and well-being.

 Botox Forehead Rockleigh, NJ

Latest News in Rockleigh, NJ

Discover a Suburban Refuge With Inspired Texture-Color Interplay

When prominent physicians Neeta and Alfred “Fred” Ogden moved from a New York apartment—where they’d raised two children—to a new, two-story house in Rockleigh, New Jersey, they wanted to transform its blank canvas into a sophisticated home where they could start collecting.The couple sought out New York–based interior design Alyssa Kapito, whose eponymous firm is known for sumptuous textures in neutral palettes, to conceive spaces featuring her signature variations in tone. They gave Kapito one bri...

When prominent physicians Neeta and Alfred “Fred” Ogden moved from a New York apartment—where they’d raised two children—to a new, two-story house in Rockleigh, New Jersey, they wanted to transform its blank canvas into a sophisticated home where they could start collecting.

The couple sought out New York–based interior design Alyssa Kapito, whose eponymous firm is known for sumptuous textures in neutral palettes, to conceive spaces featuring her signature variations in tone. They gave Kapito one brief: They wanted color.

“It was a fun exercise for us. What’s particularly cool about this project is that we used a different texture in each room as the jumping-off point,” says Kapito, who relished the opportunity to style a property that wasn’t a city apartment or summer home. (Unfortunately, the upper floor couldn’t be photographed, due to the COVID-19 shelter-in-place order coming into effect.)

In each space, an abundance of soul and patina has replaced clean white walls, making the shingle-style home by architect James Paragano feel less like a new build.

Kapito created cohesion by mixing new furnishings and artworks with antiques with period-bridging modern lines, placing pieces by the same designer in different rooms. She says the owners’ enthusiasm for the process and the synergy she developed with them drove the project from the outset.

“They were really excited about collaborating with me, which was really, really nice. They have a real appreciation for design,” says Kapito.

For New York designer Alyssa Kapito's clients' Rockleigh, New Jersey, kitchen, she used a heavily veined marble to provide personality and texture. “A lot of people are concerned about durability in terms of using natural substances. I'm not at all. The nice part about veinier marbles is that they are more forgiving, more durable in terms of masking stains over time,” she explains. A bespoke rift oak island in a dark stain and Urban Electric brass pendant lamps offer richness and warmth. Kapito chose fixtures in a mix of metals—an industrial stainless-steel hood, nickel soffits and knobs, leather and chrome stools by York Street Studio—to create flow and interest. “Stainless steel and polished nickel mix really well with brass because they have warm tones. I think the rule that you can't mix metals is so silly. Metals look really beautiful together in a room,” says Kapito, adding that while there’s no formula to getting the balance right, she stays away from using different metals in individual items.

Quake Day? NJ state workers sent home Friday was total nonsense (Opinion)

GettyImagesRemember the Canadian wildfires?We all went to work in the haze that seemed kind of like fog but also kind of orange and maybe our eyes even burned. We drove home the same way, perhaps reacquainting ourselves with the button on our dashboards for recirculated air rather than outside air.But the point is we went to work. We stayed. We put in full days. Even when the event actually could have been causing some respiratory distress to sensitive people, unlike the lack of damage and lack of injuries from Friday&rs...

GettyImages

Remember the Canadian wildfires?

We all went to work in the haze that seemed kind of like fog but also kind of orange and maybe our eyes even burned. We drove home the same way, perhaps reacquainting ourselves with the button on our dashboards for recirculated air rather than outside air.

But the point is we went to work. We stayed. We put in full days. Even when the event actually could have been causing some respiratory distress to sensitive people, unlike the lack of damage and lack of injuries from Friday’s earthquake, we went to work, and we stayed.

Back during the fires we heard of roofers donning goggles and breathing with respirators just to put in a full day. Yet state workers with indoor jobs were allowed to go home early as Gov. Phil Murphy closed down state offices.

That ridiculous response seems to have repeated itself with Friday’s earthquake. While every private sector job I know of stayed and worked and finished like any other workday Murphy closed government offices and sent workers home at 3 p.m. Not much has been said about the move but what other reason could it be?

It was an unplanned early dismissal for thousands of state workers and to what end?

Bridges and overpasses hadn’t come down. Highways were fine. Even NJ Transit had already gotten beyond their delays for doing safety checks of tracks and were back on schedule. So, why?

Especially aggravating was the closure of all Motor Vehicle Commission offices statewide. The same MVC where people now need appointments to transact business. People took time off from their own jobs just to get there only to have the rug pulled out from under them finding locked doors and cancellations.

Really Gov Murphy? Why?

One MVC worker called in Friday to our show and expressed her own frustration. She was told shortly before three they were shutting down and she recognized customers were not only going to be highly inconvenienced but they’d no doubt take it out on MVC staff.

She also confirmed there was seemingly no reason other than the earthquake the governor would have had to send them home. Computers were running fine, no building issues, nothing else that she could think of to account for it.

I suppose it’s a good thing the governor can’t run for a third term. If so, he probably would have given them a week off.

Opinions expressed in the post above are those of New Jersey 101.5 talk show host Jeff Deminski only.

You can now listen to Deminski & Doyle — On Demand! Hear New Jersey’s favorite afternoon radio show any day of the week. Download the Deminski & Doyle show wherever you get podcasts, on our free app, or listen right now.

Click here to contact an editor about feedback or a correction for this story.

2022 BERGEN COUNTY GOLF SEASON OFFICIALLY OPEN

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:March 21, 2022MEDIA CONTACT:Derek Alan [email protected], 201.250.60802022 BERGEN COUNTY GOLF SEASON OFFICIALLY OPENGolfers welcome to tee-off at one of the County’s six public courses(HACKENSACK, N.J.) – Bergen County Executive Jim Tedesco and the Board of Commissioners are pleased to announce the s...

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:

March 21, 2022

MEDIA CONTACT:

Derek Alan Sands

[email protected], 201.250.6080

2022 BERGEN COUNTY GOLF SEASON OFFICIALLY OPEN

Golfers welcome to tee-off at one of the County’s six public courses

(HACKENSACK, N.J.) – Bergen County Executive Jim Tedesco and the Board of Commissioners are pleased to announce the start of the 2022 Golf Season at all Bergen County-owned public golf courses. The Bergen County Parks System boasts six, expansive golf courses, each with their own characteristics and challenges, from Darlington Golf Course’s rolling hills to Soldier Hill Golf Course’s length and well-bunkered greens. Hundreds of thousands of golfers enjoy Bergen County’s varied courses. In 2021 alone, Bergen County’s six public courses welcomed 266,000 golfers of all skill and abilities.

Bergen County Golf Courses

Darlington Golf Course, 279 Campgaw Rd, Mahwah, NJ

Orchard Hills Golf Course, 404 Paramus Rd, Paramus, NJ

Overpeck Golf Course, 275 E. Cedar Ln, Teaneck, NJ

Rockleigh Golf Course, 15 Paris Ave, Rockleigh, NJ

Soldier Hill Golf Course, 99 Palisade Ave, Emerson, NJ

Valley Brook Golf Course, 15 Rivervale Rd, River Vale, NJ

Registered Membership (yearly fee)

$50 – Adult Resident (age 18- 61)

$25 – Junior Resident (age up to 17)

$25 – Senior Resident (age 62+)

$60 – Non-County Residents (all ages)

18 Hole Pricing

Not Registered (all ages)

Weekday – $50

Weekday Twilight – $35

Weekend – $60

Weekend Twilight – $40

Registered Adult (Bergen County Resident)

Weekday – $30

Weekday Twilight – $22

Weekend – $35

Weekend Twilight – $27

Registered Senior/Junior (Bergen County Resident)

Weekday – $22

Weekday Twilight – $16

Weekend – $32

Weekend Twilight – $23

Registered (Non-County Residents)

Weekday – $37

Weekday Twilight – $30

Weekend – $42

Weekend Twilight – $35

9 Hole Pricing (only available at Orchard Hills)

Not Registered (all ages)

Weekday – $35

Weekend – $40

Registered Adult (Bergen County Resident)

Weekday – $22

Weekend – $27

Registered Senior/Junior (Bergen County Resident)

Weekday – $16

Weekend – $23

Registered (Non-County Residents)

Weekday – $30

Weekend – $35

A membership includes early access to tee time reservations and discounted greens fees. For full price list, visit www.golfbergencounty.com. The Golf Main Office can be reached at 201-336-7259.

Bergen County Golf is dedicated to providing an enjoyable golf experience through well-maintained golf courses, reasonably paced rounds, and friendly customer service.

What Is The Richest City In New Jersey? Latest Census Data Reveals The Details

In a recent study, we analyzed and identified the richest cities in New York state based on scoring several key financial factors. This time around, we’re looking at New York’s neighbor to the south &mdas...

In a recent study, we analyzed and identified the richest cities in New York state based on scoring several key financial factors. This time around, we’re looking at New York’s neighbor to the south — New Jersey, the Garden State.

We analyzed over 700 cities in the state in order to identify the richest cities in New Jersey. The way we evaluated and scored each city’s ranking is detailed below. Read on to find out what the richest city in New Jersey is, plus the top 50 wealthiest cities in the state overall.

What Is the Richest City in New Jersey?

In order to assemble a list of the richest cities in New Jersey, we pulled data from the Census Bureau’s 2021 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates, and we constructed a four-factor scoring system to help identify the wealthiest cities in New Jersey:

When it comes to Census data, for certain factors its numbers have upper limits. For example, for median household income, the Census Bureau has an upper limit of “$250,000+”. For median home value, the upper limit is “$2,000,000+”. And, lastly, for median property taxes paid, the upper limit is “$10,000+”. For these reasons, the mean or average household income dataset is crucial because the Census Bureau has exact figures for it. All four of these metrics were scored, added up, and then ranked by the cities’ combined scores.

Below you’ll find a table detailing the top 50 richest cities in New Jersey and their respective dollar figures for each metric:

The No. 1 richest city in New Jersey in our ranking is Rockleigh, a very small town of just 74 households, situated in the far north of the Garden State, along the border with New York state. It borders Palisades, New York, whose name comes from the steep cliffs of the eastern bank of the Hudson River, which resemble palisades. Not surprisingly for the richest city in New Jersey, according to Data USA, the main occupation by employment is Management Occupations, accounting for 31.5% of the workforce. The top three industries in Rockleigh are Health Care & Social Assistance (21.3% of the workforce), Professional, Scientific, & Technical Services (20.4% of the workforce), and Construction (10.2% of the workforce). The median household income in Rockleigh is $201,500, while its average household income is the second highest out of the 700+ cities in New York we analyzed, at $413,309. The reported median home value in Rockleigh exceeds $2 million and the median property taxes paid by households is in excess of $10,000 per year.

The second richest city in New Jersey is Saddle River, which, like Rockleigh, is located in Bergen County, not far from New York state. What is particular cool about Saddle River is that it has retained a very rustic, natural appearance, filled with forests, rivers, and farmland. The median home value in Saddle River is a little over $1.94 million, and its median property taxes paid exceeds the limit of $10,000. Similarly, the median household income in Saddle River also exceeds the $250,000 Census Bureau limit. Saddle River has an average household income of $330,303 and is notably much larger than No. 1 Rockleigh, having more than 1,300 total households. Compared to some of the other richest cities in New Jersey, the top industries in Saddle River are an interesting mix: Health Care & Social Assistance (20.2% of the workforce), Wholesale Trade (11.1% of the workforce), and Professional, Scientific, & Technical Services (10.4% of the workforce), according to Data USA.

Coming in as the No. 3 richest city in New Jersey is Short Hills, a sizable unincorporated community of more than 4,500 households, located in Essex County, which is notably the county with the highest income inequality in New Jersey. Like Saddle River, the median household income in Short Hills is over $250,000 and the median property taxes paid also exceeds the Census Bureau’s upper limit of $10,000. Short Hills stands out the most by having the highest average household income in New Jersey, at $428,352. Meanwhile, its reported median home value is nearly $1.39 million.

Out of the top 50 richest cities in New Jersey, the largest is Westfield, which has 10,514 households. Westfield, like many of the wealthiest cities in New Jersey, is in the New York City metro area, located in Union County. The median household income in Westfield is $185,319, while its mean household income is $259,377. Although its median home value is only $810,400, the median property taxes paid in Westfield still exceeds $10,000 because New Jersey has notoriously high property tax rates.

Four-alarm fire rips through three homes on Lafayette Street in Paterson

PATERSON — Firefighters battled a massive four-alarm blaze that brought down part of a home on Lafayette Street and damaged two others on Friday afternoon.Emergency responders received a call reporting a fire on Lafayette near Rosa Parks Boulevard at about 3 p.m., said Paterson Public Safety Director Jerry Speziale, and the flames quickly engulfed the backside of three adjacent multi-family homes."It was like an inferno, the flames were intense," Speziale said. "It was like a fireball."...

PATERSON — Firefighters battled a massive four-alarm blaze that brought down part of a home on Lafayette Street and damaged two others on Friday afternoon.

Emergency responders received a call reporting a fire on Lafayette near Rosa Parks Boulevard at about 3 p.m., said Paterson Public Safety Director Jerry Speziale, and the flames quickly engulfed the backside of three adjacent multi-family homes.

"It was like an inferno, the flames were intense," Speziale said. "It was like a fireball."

Speziale said firefighters worked to douse the blaze "for quite some time," but not before the rear wall of the middle home collapsed and flames broke through the roof.

"That was one of the ones where I really had to say, 'Wow,'" Speziale said.

No one was injured but at least 20 residents are displaced, according to Speziale.

"It’s because of their dedication that there was no loss of life," he said, commending the work of his fire department.

Story continues after gallery

'I’ve lost everything'

Temperance Vaughan stood within a block of her third story apartment at 142 Lafayette Street with a solemn look on her face while she spoke in hushed tones. Her daughter, 18-year-old Equasia Gilchrist, stood nearby, being consoled by a friend.

“I’ve lost everything. We have nothing left,” Vaughan managed to say, her voice quivering.

Vaughan said she was watching television when her son, 28-year-old Devon Campbell, looked out his window and saw flames that were coming from the alley on the side of her building.

“My son ran in and shouted, 'Get up, Get up! There’s a fire next door,'” Vaughn elaborated. “I grabbed my pocket book and ran down three flights of stairs with my son and daughter.”

Vaughan said that soon thereafter, as she watched in horror from the street, she saw flames shooting out of her kitchen window.

Eldon Johnson said he lives on the first floor of 142 Lafayette and that when he was alerted to the fire, he was the last one to evacuate, making sure his family members got out safely. His sons, 17-year-old Zahan and 15-year-old Zion, and daughter, 4-year-old Zayling, were able to escape with their mother, Nidra Cook, according to the elder Johnson.

“We had just ordered a pizza and were ready to sit down at the table and eat,” Johnson said.

“I was watching television,” Nidra added.

Zahan said that he stepped out of his front door to retrieve a salad from the pizza delivery man when he realized something was wrong.

“I heard the fire alarm from the third floor of our building buzzing and a guy that was standing on the sidewalk in front of our house told me, “Get out, there’s a fire!”

Zahan said that he immediately ran back into his apartment and alerted his family to the danger.

“I could see flames through the sheer curtain in front of the window in my room. I could tell that the fire was starting to come into our house,” Zahan said. “I grabbed my phone and ran out of the house with my family.”

Cook managed to see a ray of sunshine in an otherwise dark cloud.

“I’m not really sad about losing my belongings because me and my family are alive and well,” the mother of three concluded. “Belongings can be replaced but lives cannot.”

Another resident, 19-year old Joshua Bonilla, said that he was watching sports on television at his apartment on the second floor of the same house when his cousin alerted him to imminent danger.

“My cousin yelled, ‘Fire! Fire!'" the recent Eastside High School graduate recounted. “All three of us, me, my father, and my cousin ran out. I feel sad. I think that everything is ruined. I’m not sure where I will stay tonight but I’m glad that I’m still alive.”

The Red Cross tweeted Friday night, "Our Volunteers responded to a home fire on Lafayette St. in #Paterson, helping 30 people from 8 families, providing Red Cross emergency assistance for temporary lodging, food and clothing needs."

Nicholas Katzban is a breaking news reporter for NorthJersey.com. To get breaking news directly to your inbox, sign up for our newsletter.

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