Hormone Replacement Therapy Clinic in Ridgewood, NJ | Juventee Medical Spa

HRT -Hormone Replacement Therapy Clinic in Ridgewood, NJ.

Is HRT for Women the Right Answer?

To live a healthy life, hormone stability is very important for women. That's where the beauty of HRT treatments for women begins to shine because it balances hormones that would otherwise be altered due to menopause.

HRT treatments for women represent a revolutionary step toward living life without the pitfalls of old age. However, at Juventee, we understand that no two women, and by proxy, patients, are the same. That's why our team of doctors and specialists provide personalized treatment options for women, combining holistic treatment, nutrition, fitness plans, and more to supplement our HRT treatments.

Is HRT the answer if you feel exhausted, overweight, and moody? That's the million-dollar question that we're asked almost every day. And to be honest, it's hard to say without a comprehensive exam by an HRT expert at Juventee. What we can say is that when a woman's hormones are better balanced during menopause, she has a much better chance of enjoying life without the crippling symptoms that other women feel.

At Juventee, helping women reclaim their vitality and love of life is our top priority. While some HRT clinics see patients as nothing more than a means to make money, our team is cut from a different cloth.

A New Youthful You Awaits at Juventee

If you are considering HRT treatments for women in Ridgewood, NJ, you need a team of hormone replacement experts by your side. At Juventee, our knowledgeable HRT doctors are ready to help. Our team will answer your initial questions, conduct necessary testing, and craft a customized program designed to alleviate the challenges you're facing as a woman going through menopause.

With a healthy diet, exercise, positive life choices, and hormone replacement therapy, unveiling the new "you" is easier than you might think. Contact our office today to get started on your journey to optimal health and well-being.

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Latest News in Ridgewood, NJ

What's A Cooper? Bergen County Student Helps Create Documentary About Wine Barrel Making

University professors and a local student studied casks, coopers, and wines in Europe to make a new documentary, "The Cooper." Patch StaffThe type of cask and the type of wood used in winemaking can significantly influence the taste, aroma, and characteristics of the beverage. (Pace University)BERGEN COUNTY, NJ — The type of cask and the type of wood used in winemaking can significantly influence the taste, aroma, and characteristics of the beverage. Recently, a Bergen County resident helped put togethe...

University professors and a local student studied casks, coopers, and wines in Europe to make a new documentary, "The Cooper."

Patch Staff

The type of cask and the type of wood used in winemaking can significantly influence the taste, aroma, and characteristics of the beverage. (Pace University)

BERGEN COUNTY, NJ — The type of cask and the type of wood used in winemaking can significantly influence the taste, aroma, and characteristics of the beverage. Recently, a Bergen County resident helped put together a documentary called “The Cooper: Crafting the Soul of the Cask” that will premiere this week.

Pace University’s documentary film team — PaceDocs — will show the film at 7 p.m. on Thursday, May 2, 2024 at the Jacob Burns Film Center in Pleasantville, N.Y.

Lorenzo Osorio, a junior majoring in digital cinema and filmmaking who hails from Dumont, played an important and unique role on set.

“My primary roles were on-location translator and editor,” said Osorio. “I was one of only three people that spoke Spanish fluently on [a research] trip, so I felt like I was contributing something unique to the film. Aside from basic interpreting, I especially had to be involved in interviews, either conducting them or scribing notes.”

“The Cooper” is an exploration of the art of cask making, also known as cooperage. Its rich history that can be traced back to ancient civilizations, with evidence of wooden containers used for storing and transporting liquids found in archaeological sites dating as far back as 2690 BCE in Egypt.

Find out what's happening in Ridgewood-Glen Rockwith free, real-time updates from Patch.

The documentary was filmed in the Andalusian region of Spain, specifically Montilla-Mariles over the course of several weeks.

“The PaceDocs team, under the leadership of Professor Maria Luskay, has once again produced a professional, fascinating and timely film,” said Marvin Krislov, president of Pace University. “ ‘The Cooper’ is another great example of the hands-on experience that uniquely captures the tradition and rich history of cask making. I marvel at the consistent excellence and talent in this program and am impressed by this group of filmmakers.”

The documentary is the focus of the popular class, “Producing the Documentary”, which is part of the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences atPace University’s highly regarded film program. It requires students complete a full-length environmentally themed documentary within 14 weeks.

During the process, students learn teamwork, problem-solving, research, and organization, along with technical skills such as lighting, sound, camera work, interviewing, and other real-life lessons necessary to complete a film.

For the first time ever, PaceDocs will be premiering a documentary in both English and in Spanish. The English version will premiere at the Jacob Burns Film Center while the Spanish version will debut in Montilla and Cordoba, Spain.

The documentary was produced by Dyson College of Arts and Sciences Professors Maria Luskay and Lou Guarneri, and Pace University’s documentary film team.

The PaceDocs team collaborated with José Buendía Picó, a well-known Spanish musician and composer, to provide the music to an audiovisual story. Pico has won 14 composition awards.

Tickets for the reception and screening are available, though space is limited. (Use code PaceDocs24 for free tickets.)

“The Cooper” continues a tradition of creating meaningful films. In recent years, Pace filmmakers have produced documentaries around the globe focusing on a number of topics, including the farm-to-table food movement in France (2023); how oysters depend on the ebb and flow of tides (2022); the importance of bees as pollinators in our food supply (2021); the impact of earthquakes in Hawaii (2019); the endurance of the people of Puerto Rico in the aftermath of Hurricane Maria (2018); Cuba at a cultural crossroads (2016); and other poignant films.

“Dyson College’s student filmmakers have produced another moving documentary that delves into the important and fascinating history of cask making,” said Tresmaine R. Grimes, dean, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences and School of Education, and interim dean for the Sands College of Performing Arts.

Get tickets and find out more here.

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Total Solar Eclipse: How Much We’ll See In Ridgewood, When To See It

How much of the eclipse will you see if you stay in Ridgewood, and what time should you look out for it? Find out below.Patch StaffRIDGEWOOD, NJ — Excitement is building in North Jersey for the Monday, April 8 total solar eclipse. While we’re not among the 32 million Americans living in the path of totality, we're close enough to enjoy the celestial sensation.In the ...

How much of the eclipse will you see if you stay in Ridgewood, and what time should you look out for it? Find out below.

Patch Staff

RIDGEWOOD, NJ — Excitement is building in North Jersey for the Monday, April 8 total solar eclipse. While we’re not among the 32 million Americans living in the path of totality, we're close enough to enjoy the celestial sensation.

In the United States, the path of totality extends from Texas to Maine, but each of the 48 continental states will see some of the solar eclipse, which occurs when the moon slips between our bright star and Earth.

In Bergen County, the moon will cover at least 90 percent of the sun at the peak of the eclipse, according to a NASA map that is searchable by ZIP code. Depending on which town you're in, it may cover a bit more.

For instance, near the county's southern border, in Kearny, the moon will cover around 90.2 percent of the sun. But up north in Mahwah, the moon will cover 91.5 percent. In Ridgewood, it will cover approximately 91 percent, and in Wyckoff, it will cover 91.2 percent.

Timing For Bergen County:

Find out what's happening in Ridgewood-Glen Rockwith free, real-time updates from Patch.

Partial eclipse begins: 2:10 p.m.Totality begins: 2:51 p.m.Maximum: 3:25 p.m.Totality ends: 3:58 p.m.Partial ends: 4:36 p.m.

In places with totality, the sun will go completely dark for just a few minutes.

Events: Flat Rock Park in Englewood is holding a viewing party that day. Find out more here.

Right now, it looks like we could have clouds and rain for the big event, but anything can change. Put your ZIP code into the NASA site for updates.

The total solar eclipse starts in Mexico, entering the United States in Texas and traveling through Oklahoma, Arkansas, Missouri, Illinois, Kentucky, Indiana, Ohio, Pennsylvania, New York, Vermont, New Hampshire and Maine. It also goes through small parts of Tennessee and Michigan.

It then enters Canada in southern Ontario and proceeds through Quebec, New Brunswick, Prince Edward Island and Cape Breton before exiting continental North America on the Atlantic coast of Newfoundland, Canada.

It will be March 30, 2033, before another total solar eclipse touches the United States, and that’s only on the tip of Alaska. It’ll be Aug. 12, 2044, before the next eclipse sweeps across the lower 48 states, with parts of Montana and North Dakota experiencing totality.

Related Articles

Many reminisce about the joy Ridgewood's Warner Theater brought to generations

...

With the Warner Theater in Ridgewood set to close permanently on Sunday, members of the community are reminiscing about the historic site they say has brought joy to many residents.

Paul Giordano of Waldwick remembers how his mother would give him some extra money when he went to the movie theater as a child so he could tip the gentleman who typically played a flute or violin outside.

One Instagram post read that the street musician, Philip Belpasso, was a "fixture on the streets of Ridgewood for over 20 years" and brought electric energy to those who were entering or leaving the theater.

Giordano also remembers the theater's Tuesday specials, which allowed customers to see a movie at an affordable price.

The Ridgewood theater opened in 1932, and Giordano said his mother visited the theater as a child. He said he loved having the opportunity to support local businesses such as the Warner Theater.

Other residents were upset to hear about its closing. Many comments on Instagram read that the news was heartbreaking, and others commented that the theater was the "heart of the town" and said they were sad to lose a place full of movies and memories.

Some film enthusiasts reflected on the movies they got to see in the theater, such as the "Star Wars" prequels, "The Rocky Horror Picture Show" and "Rush Hour 2."

One Facebook commenter wrote: "As an immigrant to the USA in 1966, the Warner Theater has been a significant part of my life. I can still vividly remember the first movie I saw there, "The Sound of Music." Although I didn't speak English at the time, the power of music transcended language barriers."

The owners of the Warner Theater, Bow Tie Partners, said they want to remain engaged with the downtown Ridgewood district. The real estate agency has said it hopes to transform the space into a single-auditorium performing arts venue.

Bergen County Businesswoman Pivoted To The Arts During Covid, But Is Saying Goodbye

After pivoting during the pandemic, a female business owner and (very modest) artist is saying goodbye to longtime North Jersey customers.Patch StaffHope pivoted during the pandemic. (Caren Lissner/Patch)Hope's handmade signs show evidence that she's an artist. (Caren Lissner/Patch)Work dried up during the pandemic. (Caren Lissner/Patch)BERGEN COUNTY, NJ — Even though Bergen County resident Hope Kim says she's not an artist, the evidence in the window of her North Jersey business says otherwise....

After pivoting during the pandemic, a female business owner and (very modest) artist is saying goodbye to longtime North Jersey customers.

Patch Staff

Hope pivoted during the pandemic. (Caren Lissner/Patch)

Hope's handmade signs show evidence that she's an artist. (Caren Lissner/Patch)

Work dried up during the pandemic. (Caren Lissner/Patch)

BERGEN COUNTY, NJ — Even though Bergen County resident Hope Kim says she's not an artist, the evidence in the window of her North Jersey business says otherwise.

During the last few years that she's run Swan Cleaners on Hoboken's main street, the Palisades Park resident has displayed her elaborate handmade journals in the window, and she also designs hand-drawn signs for the business that show a creative bent.

Saturday, she will close the business for good, and isn't sure what she'll do next, she says. She doesn't see herself as an artist, but perhaps she's just being modest.

Kim moved to Palisades Park in 2006 from South Korea. She worked as a legal secretary for a few years, then took over Swan Cleaners in 2010 from another owner.

For the next 14 years, she provided dry cleaning, folding and pressing, and alterations to suits and wedding gowns.

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But she also created handmade jewelry on the side.

Her business did moderately well until work dried up during the pandemic in 2020.

"During covid there was not much work at the store," she said, referring to both dry cleaning and jewelry. "I started watching the YouTube craft channels."

She became interested in handmade journals, which decades ago were traditional gifts on special occasions, like weddings and anniversaries.

Kim began showing the journals in her store window, and sold about two or three per month, she said, for birthdays and other occasions.

It was definitely a niche business, but "Once they bought one, they kept coming back," she said.

She's not sure if she will sell the journals or jewelry on line, she said.

But she is sure of one thing.

"I wanted to thank all the people around me," she said. "They were really loyal to the business. It's hard to say goodbye to them. Some of them, I've known for 14 years."

Several Have 'Folded'

Kim's business is one of many dry cleaners in New Jersey that have closed since the pandemic. With more people working at home, and casual clothes more often accepted in the workplace, there's less demand to press and clean work attire.

The industry had been on the decline for years, reports say, and it got worse during the pandemic. (It should be noted that the makers of Tide say the future of laundry services is still bright, and presumably colorful.)

"We never recovered after that," Kim said. "It got slower and slower."

Rents also continued to climb, she noted.

Swan Cleaners will remain open through Saturday, Kim said, and anyone can stop by or reach out to her at [email protected].

Swan Cleaners is located at 906 Washington St., Hoboken.

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NJ community rallies around school crossing guard battling stage four cancer

RIDGEWOOD, New Jersey (WABC) -- A community is rallying around a local crossing guard after she was diagnosed with stage four cancer last month.Janett Balboa has been a resident of Ridgewood, New Jersey for over 30 years. Throughout her time living there, she has served her community's schools as a crossing guard and a lunch aide.Now, there is a substitute crossing guard taking Balboa's place, but Ridgewood students feel that Balboa can't be replaced. The 5 to 11-year-old students made handmade cards to show support for their b...

RIDGEWOOD, New Jersey (WABC) -- A community is rallying around a local crossing guard after she was diagnosed with stage four cancer last month.

Janett Balboa has been a resident of Ridgewood, New Jersey for over 30 years. Throughout her time living there, she has served her community's schools as a crossing guard and a lunch aide.

Now, there is a substitute crossing guard taking Balboa's place, but Ridgewood students feel that Balboa can't be replaced. The 5 to 11-year-old students made handmade cards to show support for their beloved crossing guard.

"Thank you so much for taking care of us.We hope you feel better soon. Get well," one of the cards said.

A fundraiser has been created by Balboa's son, Anthony, to assist her with her medical bills and living costs as she undergoes treatment. As of Monday, more than $45 thousand was raised.

Her son was surprised by the outpouring of support.

"We are so grateful for the outpouring of love and support we have seen in response to this news, and we are so grateful to the Ridgewood community in advance," Anthony Balboa said.

The average gift for the GoFundMe page is $100. On the site there are notes in different languages wishing Balboa well, and messages from former students who are now adults.

ALSO READ | New York City, Tri-State animal shelters at capacity, emblematic of national crisis

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