Hormone Replacement Therapy Clinic in New Milford, NJ | Juventee Medical Spa

HRT -Hormone Replacement Therapy Clinic in New Milford, NJ.

Is HRT for Women the Right Answer?

To live a healthy life, hormone stability is very important for women. That's where the beauty of HRT treatments for women begins to shine because it balances hormones that would otherwise be altered due to menopause.

HRT treatments for women represent a revolutionary step toward living life without the pitfalls of old age. However, at Juventee, we understand that no two women, and by proxy, patients, are the same. That's why our team of doctors and specialists provide personalized treatment options for women, combining holistic treatment, nutrition, fitness plans, and more to supplement our HRT treatments.

Is HRT the answer if you feel exhausted, overweight, and moody? That's the million-dollar question that we're asked almost every day. And to be honest, it's hard to say without a comprehensive exam by an HRT expert at Juventee. What we can say is that when a woman's hormones are better balanced during menopause, she has a much better chance of enjoying life without the crippling symptoms that other women feel.

At Juventee, helping women reclaim their vitality and love of life is our top priority. While some HRT clinics see patients as nothing more than a means to make money, our team is cut from a different cloth.

A New Youthful You Awaits at Juventee

If you are considering HRT treatments for women in New Milford, NJ, you need a team of hormone replacement experts by your side. At Juventee, our knowledgeable HRT doctors are ready to help. Our team will answer your initial questions, conduct necessary testing, and craft a customized program designed to alleviate the challenges you're facing as a woman going through menopause.

With a healthy diet, exercise, positive life choices, and hormone replacement therapy, unveiling the new "you" is easier than you might think. Contact our office today to get started on your journey to optimal health and well-being.

 Botox Forehead New Milford, NJ

Latest News in New Milford, NJ

Which North Jersey school districts got the biggest aid increases? Which lost the most?

Inflationary pressures were the biggest reason behind a bump in proposed state funding in the 2023-24 fiscal year for many North Jersey school districts.Statewide, the Murphy administration proposed a total increase of $832 million in K-12 funding, according to figures released recently by the Department of Education. That would lift total state aid for the state's 600-odd sc...

Inflationary pressures were the biggest reason behind a bump in proposed state funding in the 2023-24 fiscal year for many North Jersey school districts.

Statewide, the Murphy administration proposed a total increase of $832 million in K-12 funding, according to figures released recently by the Department of Education. That would lift total state aid for the state's 600-odd school districts to a combined $10.7 billion, putting the Murphy administration closer to its goal of "fully funding" the state’s public schools by 2025, experts say.

It's important not to jump to conclusions just because one district saw big gains while another lost aid. What ultimately affects a school is its operating budget and how much of it is derived from local taxes.

"It is difficult to assess the relative impact on districts when calculating the percentage change just in terms of state aid," said school funding expert Danielle Farrie of the Education Law Center, an advocate for fair funding. "A large percentage loss of state aid in a district that is funded primarily through local funding is very different from a large percentage loss in a district that is predominantly funded through state aid. It is more instructive to look at the changes relative to each district’s operating budget."

Look up your district:NJ has released 2024 school funding figures. See how much will go to your district

Districts that are unable to raise the revenue they need from local property taxes — while continuing to deal with drops in state aid — feel the burden the most. Declines in state aid are usually linked to falling enrollment.

The state needs to pay attention to those districts, because they will be spending below what is considered an adequate rate per student and would likely face painful cuts to "classroom staff, social-emotional supports and other essential programs," Farrie said.

"The aid numbers may have been more unpredictable this year due to the impact of inflation and property values on how aid is calculated," Farrie said. "Some districts may have received more than they were expecting, and others much less. We are concerned about some districts’ ability to absorb these cuts, especially those spending below the formula’s adequacy target."

Biggest winners among Bergen County districts

Bergen County districts saw some big gains, with around a 55% increase in aid over the previous year for Ridgefield and a 44% increase for Cliffside Park. All 75 Bergen school districts saw gains in state K-12 aid for fiscal year 2023-24 compared with the previous year, except three: Rockleigh, Waldwick and New Milford. New Milford saw a drop of around 13%.

Biggest winners among Passaic County districts

Passaic County saw some significant proposed gains in state school aid. Woodland Park gained 68% and Passaic Valley Regional gained 40% compared with last year. Five of Passaic county's 20 school districts saw drops in aid. Lakeland Regional and West Milford Township lost 27% and 17.6%, respectively.

Winners and losers among Morris County districts

Morris County's Boonton Town and Morris Hills Regional saw gains of around 33% each. Five of Morris county's 39 school districts saw a drop in state aid this year. The biggest losers were Washington Township and Jefferson Township, at around 11% and 23%, respectively.

Winners and losers among Sussex County districts

In a continuing trend, the North Jersey county to lose the most aid is Sussex, where rural districts reportedly have seen enrollment drops. Some 12 of the county's 25 districts lost aid compared with the previous year. Hopatcong lost 28%. Kittatinny Regional lost 23%. Green Township and Stillwater Township each lost around 22%.

Sussex County's Sandyston-Walpack Township and Newton saw the biggest gains from the previous year, up 32% and 21% in aid.

Sussex County has consistently seen annual drops in aid, except this year, when it increased by around 2%.

State of the Program: New Milford football hoping to emerge from the fire in 2023

New Milford has the opportunity to reap the benefits from two seasons of playing so many underclassmen.The Knights return almost every starter to a junior-heavy team that was 1-7 last season and won a combined three games over the past two seasons.“The kids got thrown into the fire,” Don Jaconia said as he enters his third season as coach, “but they should be the better for it, because we have a lot of experience coming back.”New Milford graduated only one key two-way starter and will be considera...

New Milford has the opportunity to reap the benefits from two seasons of playing so many underclassmen.

The Knights return almost every starter to a junior-heavy team that was 1-7 last season and won a combined three games over the past two seasons.

“The kids got thrown into the fire,” Don Jaconia said as he enters his third season as coach, “but they should be the better for it, because we have a lot of experience coming back.”

New Milford graduated only one key two-way starter and will be considerably more competitive with a 40-player program that features 15 juniors and seven seniors. The Knights learned valuable lessons, gained valuable experience with their youth movement.

“Internally, our team has embraced it, and knows that it’s a process, and you don’t build a program overnight,” Jaconia said. “We were in a situation where we had to put some young players out on the field against varsity football teams, maybe before they were ready.

"But now they have that experience, and the kids have a great attitude and come to work every day and keep getting better and better, and I think we’re going to start to see that pay off.”

The tradition

New Milford has won two sectional titles since the NJSIAA introduced sectional playoffs in 1974. In 1985 and 1986, the Knights captured back-to-back North 1, Group 1 titles with victories over Hasbrouck Heights.

Jaconia succeeded longtime coach Bill Wilde in 2021 and is 3-14 over his first two seasons. The Knights’ last playoff win came in 2019, when they beat Hoboken, 15-14, in a North 2, Group 1 opener.

The challenge

The offense must control the ball and clock and produce multiple touchdowns each game, one season after being held to one score or fewer five times.

Junior Jerzey Ryan returns to quarterback the multiple attack. He will have veteran receivers in juniors Giovanni Nicodeme and Kyle Tennant and senior Yandel Mateo.

Jaconia says the team is also putting a "renewed emphasis on the run game this year."

STATE OF THE PROGRAM:Inside look at every HS football team in North Jersey

Expectations

New Milford will compete for multiple wins in the small-school NJIC, but how many depends on how well its 3-4 defense performs. The Knights allowed 27 or more points six times last season.

“We expect to be better across the board and be more competitive in all phases,” Jaconia said. “We’re looking to make plays and get stops defensively, just play some tough, hard-nosed football, and hopefully good things happen.”

2023 schedule

Aug. 31: at Cresskill/Emerson

Sept. 8: at Lyndhurst

Sept. 14: vs. Waldwick/Midland Park

Sept. 23: at Lodi

Sept. 30: vs. Secaucus

Game 6: TBD

Game 7: TBD

Game 8: TBD

N.J. weather: Which towns got the most rain from big coastal storm? Rainfall totals in all 21 counties.

The monster coastal storm that battered New Jersey with fierce winds and heavy downpours Sunday night into Monday morning isn’t finished yet. But it already has dumped as much as 4 inches of rain — a whole month’s worth — in some areas of the state.Preliminary reports from ...

The monster coastal storm that battered New Jersey with fierce winds and heavy downpours Sunday night into Monday morning isn’t finished yet. But it already has dumped as much as 4 inches of rain — a whole month’s worth — in some areas of the state.

Preliminary reports from the National Weather Service and the Rutgers NJ Weather Network show widespread areas of 2 to 3 inches of rain, with some places getting drenched with 4 to 5 inches.

All that water arrived just one week after another storm dropped 2 to 4 inches of rain across the region, along with a quick burst of snow in a few northern counties.

Here’s a look at rainfall totals reported as of early Monday morning from the latest storm. (These totals will be updated later Monday when new reports become available. Some towns are listed more than once, because the numbers came from different weather monitoring stations in the same town.)

Atlantic County

Bergen County

Burlington County

Camden County

Cape May County

Cumberland County

Essex County

Gloucester County

Hudson County

Hunterdon County

Mercer County

Middlesex County

Monmouth County

Morris County

Ocean County

Passaic County

Salem County

Somerset County

Sussex County

Union County

Warren County

Current weather radar

Stories by Len Melisurgo

Thank you for relying on us to provide the local weather news you can trust. Please consider supporting NJ.com with a voluntary subscription.

Len Melisurgo may be reached at

If you purchase a product or register for an account through a link on our site, we may receive compensation. By using this site, you consent to our User Agreement and agree that your clicks, interactions, and personal information may be collected, recorded, and/or stored by us and social media and other third-party partners in accordance with our Privacy Policy.

West Milford wildfire scorches hundreds of acres, largest in northern New Jersey since 2010

WEST MILFORD, N.J. -- Firefighters are making progress against a fire that has been burning in Passaic County for days.Saturday, officials said the Kanouse fire in West Milford is 100 percent contained.The fire burned 972 acres, and five buildings in the area were evacuated as a precaution.Echo Lake Road remained closed Sa...

WEST MILFORD, N.J. -- Firefighters are making progress against a fire that has been burning in Passaic County for days.

Saturday, officials said the Kanouse fire in West Milford is 100 percent contained.

The fire burned 972 acres, and five buildings in the area were evacuated as a precaution.

Echo Lake Road remained closed Saturday between Route 23 and Macopin Road due to weakened and dead trees along the road. Forest Fire Service crews will remain on scene to monitor the area and improve containment lines.

The cause of the wildfire remains under investigation.

Thursday night, firefighters converged in the woods in West Milford, right behind Michael Ryan's home near Sherwood Court, where the fire continued to smolder.

"What they're doing now is going through the woods here, and just putting out some of the remaining fires. They did a controlled burn the other day, so they're going through it, and it seems they have it under control now, which is great," West Milford resident Michael Ryan said.

Overnight Thursday, flames peeked through the trees in the night sky.

"We're actively monitoring, and trying to stay strong here. Should we need to leave, we're ready to go," resident Andrew Mancini said. "Obviously if we need to pack up and go - it's all sentimental items. things that can't be replaced. Family photos, heirlooms."

Firefighters worked around the clock in 24-hour shifts to attack the fire from every angle.

"Really glad to see what they're doing. They're just doing such a great job protecting the community," Ryan said.

Firefighters were using helicopters to drop water on the forest.

"We have great confidence in our control lines. We will continue to mop up, patrol, cut down any dead trees," said Greg McLaughlin of the New Jersey Forest Fire Service.

Watch Christine Sloan's Friday 5 p.m. report

Officials said they faced a serious situation overnight Thursday, including embers flying and starting new fires. They said warm temperatures, dry vegetation and dying trees infested with bugs fueled the blaze.

"With the dying of the ash trees, that opportunity for the fire to climb up into those dead trees is what we started to see yesterday, and the wind picking up and carrying those embers and spotting it ahead of us is what's caused some of the problem," said NJ DEP Assistant Commissioner John Cecil.

One family was under mandatory evacuation, others voluntary. All evacuations had been lifted by Friday night, and no structures were threatened.

Billowing smoke caused haze for miles.

"The smell was pretty bad. My eyes were burning as I was driving up here. I was actually coughing and I had the windows closed in my car," said Jennifer Petruccelli, who owns a shop in West Milford.

"The terrain is rocky, steep. There's risk from fallen trees, rolling logs, burning debris. So what we're trying to do is establish control lines," said Greg McLaughlin of the New Jersey Forest Fire Service.

All this came while the region saw record high temperatures.

"It's very fatiguing. You start seeing that fatigue set in when you are going day after day and through the night," McLaughlin said.

It's the largest wildfire in the region since 2010, but fortunately no injuries have been reported.

"I've lived here for 40 years and this is the first fire I've seen back there," said Richard Keller.

Christine Sloan

Christine Sloan is an Emmy Award-winning reporter, who covers New Jersey for CBS 2 New York. Sloan re-joined the station in January 2023. She also worked at CBS 2 New York from 2004 to 2016.

Twitter

Disclaimer:

This website publishes news articles that contain copyrighted material whose use has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. The non-commercial use of these news articles for the purposes of local news reporting constitutes "Fair Use" of the copyrighted materials as provided for in Section 107 of the US Copyright Law.
Contact Us