Hormone Replacement Therapy Clinic in Lyndhurst, NJ | Juventee Medical Spa

HRT -Hormone Replacement Therapy Clinic in Lyndhurst, NJ.

Is HRT for Women the Right Answer?

To live a healthy life, hormone stability is very important for women. That's where the beauty of HRT treatments for women begins to shine because it balances hormones that would otherwise be altered due to menopause.

HRT treatments for women represent a revolutionary step toward living life without the pitfalls of old age. However, at Juventee, we understand that no two women, and by proxy, patients, are the same. That's why our team of doctors and specialists provide personalized treatment options for women, combining holistic treatment, nutrition, fitness plans, and more to supplement our HRT treatments.

Is HRT the answer if you feel exhausted, overweight, and moody? That's the million-dollar question that we're asked almost every day. And to be honest, it's hard to say without a comprehensive exam by an HRT expert at Juventee. What we can say is that when a woman's hormones are better balanced during menopause, she has a much better chance of enjoying life without the crippling symptoms that other women feel.

At Juventee, helping women reclaim their vitality and love of life is our top priority. While some HRT clinics see patients as nothing more than a means to make money, our team is cut from a different cloth.

A New Youthful You Awaits at Juventee

If you are considering HRT treatments for women in Lyndhurst, NJ, you need a team of hormone replacement experts by your side. At Juventee, our knowledgeable HRT doctors are ready to help. Our team will answer your initial questions, conduct necessary testing, and craft a customized program designed to alleviate the challenges you're facing as a woman going through menopause.

With a healthy diet, exercise, positive life choices, and hormone replacement therapy, unveiling the new "you" is easier than you might think. Contact our office today to get started on your journey to optimal health and well-being.

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State of the Program: Lyndhurst football sets sights on a 'return to glory'

The Lyndhurst football program is facing a major problem that coach Rich Tuero Jr. can accept.“It actually feels like we have 100 kids… we have over 80 in the program right now,” Tuero said. “It’s wild. I ran out of lockers for the first time in my career, as a player or coach – I can’t believe it.”That the Group 2 Golden Bears are getting the kind of turnout they had as a Group 3 school in the 1950s and ’60s is one reason the squad adopted its 2023 rallying ...

The Lyndhurst football program is facing a major problem that coach Rich Tuero Jr. can accept.

“It actually feels like we have 100 kids… we have over 80 in the program right now,” Tuero said. “It’s wild. I ran out of lockers for the first time in my career, as a player or coach – I can’t believe it.”

That the Group 2 Golden Bears are getting the kind of turnout they had as a Group 3 school in the 1950s and ’60s is one reason the squad adopted its 2023 rallying cry.

“‘Return to glory,’ baby, that’s the motto,” Tuero said. “If we do what we can do, I think we can make some serious noise and make a run. We have the tools, it’s just a matter of execution and staying healthy, obviously.”

The other reason for Lyndhurst’s optimism is the return of numerous starters who gained experience during last year’s 3-6 campaign. The team went 3-1 in the NJIC Liberty Division to place second and also made an appearance in the NJSIAA North Group 2 regional invitational for teams that did not reach the state playoffs.

“Last year, we were a rookie team,” said Tuero, now entering his 10th season. “But we have much more experience on the field this year than we did a year ago, which I’m really, really excited about.”

The tradition

The Golden Bears’ previous “return to glory” trek took 36 years, from the 1983 North 1, Group 2 championship to the 2019 team that collected conference and sectional titles.

The goal is to strive for the standard set by Lyndhurst from 1948-73, when it was awarded 13 sectional trophies in 26 seasons, including a run of 10 in 12 years that culminated in the 1950s. The major difference of the modern era is the presence of state playoffs, as well as more schools in existence.

However, the Golden Bears now have the additional incentive of true state championships. When they won the North 1, Group 2 title four years ago, the NJSIAA playoffs stopped at the regional level.

STATE OF THE PROGRAM:Inside look at every HS football team in North Jersey

The challenge

How well Lyndhurst is able to go toe-to-toe with follow playoff contenders will determine how great a leap the team can make this autumn.

All three of the Golden Bears’ 2022 wins came against teams with losing records, and their best showing against a winning team was a seven-point loss to North Arlington.

“In the past couple of years, we’ve been beating not-so-good football teams and thinking that was good enough,” Tuero said. “And it wasn’t, obviously. So, the key is to overcome adversity and win tough games.”

The return of the entire offensive line, led by third-year starter Jake Herman (senior LT), should make a positive impact in that regard.

Expectations

There will be continuity in the offense with the return of two juniors: quarterback Shawn Bellenger (1,009 yards, 7 TD passing) and leading rusher Roddy Morinho (724 yards, 8 TD).

In the past two years, Lyndhurst’s division has been decided by its game against Waldwick/Midland Park, with the Warriors prevailing both times. The same teams will be battling atop the NJIC Liberty yet again.

The Golden Bears also have a cross-divisional game lined up with reigning conference champ Rutherford at the end of September, which will provide a measuring stick as the season reaches the stretch run.

“You’ve got to learn to win those big games,” Tuero said. “I feel like we had so much experience losing those big games, that now it’s time to turn the corner and see what we’ve got when it comes down to it.”

2023 schedule

Aug. 31: at Secaucus

Sept. 8: vs. New Milford

Sept. 14: at Cresskill/Emerson

Sept. 22: vs. Waldwick/Midland Park

Sept. 30: at Rutherford, Tryon Field

Oct. 6: NJIC game TBD (home)

Oct. 13: NJIC game TBD (home)

Oct. 20: NJIC game TBD (away)

Fifth-generation North Jersey yarn company turns 145 years old. Yes, yarn is still a thing

LYNDHURST — Get the image of your sweet grandma knitting you a sweater, maybe with one sleeve slightly longer than the other, when you think of yarn?Then your concept of the fashion fundamental needs an update. It has evolved, especially during the pandemic, much as the Lion Brand Yarn Company has in the 145 years since it was founded.Lion Brand, headquartered in Lyndhurst, calls itself the nation's oldest yarn company. It manufactures and distributes yarn products and "has continually responded to evo...

LYNDHURST — Get the image of your sweet grandma knitting you a sweater, maybe with one sleeve slightly longer than the other, when you think of yarn?

Then your concept of the fashion fundamental needs an update. It has evolved, especially during the pandemic, much as the Lion Brand Yarn Company has in the 145 years since it was founded.

Lion Brand, headquartered in Lyndhurst, calls itself the nation's oldest yarn company. It manufactures and distributes yarn products and "has continually responded to evolving consumer needs and trends throughout the years," said its CEO Adam Blumenthal. "Whether it’s pop culture, nascent trends or fashion, we’ve always looked for inspiration that we can translate into the yarn category."

The ability to spot and stay on top of trends has been a big part of the company's success, Blumenthal said.

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Lion Brand introduced the "hugely popular Fun Fur," which is very furry-looking yarn, and socially conscious lines, including sustainable yarns made from renewable and recycled fiber, and Skein Tones, a line of yarns that "complements a wide spectrum of skin tones" created in partnership with Black crochet artist Aniqua Wilkerson, Blumenthal said.

Like any company with a long history, he said, Lion Brand "weathered many challenges over the years." He said the COVID-19 pandemic disrupted supply chains but also sparked a boom in home hobbies, including knitting and crocheting.

The beginning

Lion Brand Yarn Company is a fifth-generation, family-owned business founded in North Jersey in 1878 by Blumenthal's great-great-grandfather Reuben, before the automobile, motion pictures, the Hershey Bar and Coca-Cola, reads a company release.

Today Lion Brand yarns are sold online and in stores across North America and in more than 100 countries.

Staying current

The pandemic lockdowns and stress that came with them made knitting and crocheting a cool thing once more, this time for people of all ages. It helped relieve the stress "through the soothing, repetitive motions" and by helping people be creative, a company spokesperson said in the release.

Today's yarn enthusiasts are of all ages, demographics and locations. The company interacts with yarn buyers and users and works to nurture those relationships by giving away thousands of free patterns on its website. Lion Brand even has bloggers and influencers as well as webpages on how to crochet and knit and weave.

"You may be surprised to learn that ⅓ of knitters and crocheters are 18-34 years old," Blumenthal said via email. "The last few years especially have seen an explosion in knitting and crocheting interest from young, diverse audiences," he said, adding that celebrity knitters, social media trends and the "increasing awareness around the mental health benefits of knitting" for all ages attract new users.

Sustainable yarns and natural fibers are the most recent trends, along with chunky yarns, which are a great choice for beginners, Blumenthal said. Chunky yarn works well for blankets, scarves and other large projects, the company said.

Lion Brand products

Lion Brand produces a wide range of yarns in various colors, thicknesses and materials, including cotton, acrylic, wool and specialty fibers. Legacy lines, including Wool-Ease, Wool-Ease Thick & Quick, Hometown, Heartland, Homespun and Pound of Love, are the best sellers, according to Blumenthal. There's also a Vanna’s Choice line, created and introduced by company spokesperson Vanna White, who has publicly talked about her love of crocheting. That line has raised more than $2 million for St. Jude’s Children’s Research Hospital.

Story continues below video.

The corporate offices are in Lyndhurst, but wool and yarns come from an array of partner farms and mills globally. The distribution center is in Savannah, Georgia.

Notable company milestones

The company shared some of its notable milestones:

NJ Medieval Times Employees Appeal to National Labor Relations Board in Ongoing Joust with Union Officials

Newark, NJ (September 21, 2023) – Artemisia Morley, a cast member at the Lyndhurst, NJ, location of Medieval Times, has submitted a Request for Review to the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) in Washington, D.C., defending her and her coworkers’ right to vote unwanted officials of the American Guild of Variety Artists (AGVA) union out of the workplace. Morley is receiving free legal representation from National Right to Work Legal Defense Foundation staff attorneys.Morley’s Request for Review cha...

Newark, NJ (September 21, 2023) – Artemisia Morley, a cast member at the Lyndhurst, NJ, location of Medieval Times, has submitted a Request for Review to the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) in Washington, D.C., defending her and her coworkers’ right to vote unwanted officials of the American Guild of Variety Artists (AGVA) union out of the workplace. Morley is receiving free legal representation from National Right to Work Legal Defense Foundation staff attorneys.

Morley’s Request for Review challenges NLRB Region 22’s hurried dismissal of a petition she filed on behalf of her coworkers seeking an election to remove the AGVA union (also known as a “decertification election”). Her petition contained the signatures of a strong majority of her coworkers, but the Regional Director dismissed it “without any hearing, and without citing any evidence that there was a ‘causal nexus’ between the Employees’ disaffection from the Union” and unproven allegations that union officials had levied against the employer.

Because New Jersey lacks Right to Work protections for its private sector workers, AGVA union officials have the power to force Morley and her coworkers to pay union fees as a condition of keeping their jobs. In contrast, in states with Right to Work laws, union bosses can’t enter agreements with employers that force employees to fork over a portion of their paychecks to the union just to get or keep a job.

“Secretive” and “Self-Interested” AGVA Union Officials Tried to Stifle Worker-Requested Vote

The Request for Review notes that AGVA union officials were “secretive, self-interested, and divisive,” and “regularly advocated that the [Medieval Times] employees go on strike, something that had no support among the unit employees.” After waiting out the statutory one-year bar on union elections that follows a union’s certification, Morley filed the petition requesting a union decertification vote.

According to the Request for Review, instead of processing the petition as NLRB rules dictate, NLRB Region 22 issued a complaint against the employer and dismissed Morley’s petition based on unproven “blocking charges” AGVA union officials filed against Medieval Times management. The Request for Review argues that the hasty dismissal violated NLRB election rules, the Administrative Procedure Act, and well-established NLRB precedent requiring a hearing to demonstrate whether union allegations of employer misconduct actually caused employee discontent with the union.

“None of the alleged unfair labor practice allegations…concern the Employees’ collection of the decertification signatures or the Employer’s domination of the Union. Thus…an election should be held and the votes immediately counted,” the Request for Review contends. “Even if the Board determined the allegations warranted consideration under [NLRB rules], its plain terms prohibit dismissing a petition prior to an election.”

Case May Be Used to Push Radical Agenda of Biden-Appointed NLRB General Counsel

In 2020, the NLRB adopted Foundation-backed reforms that made it less difficult for workers to eliminate an unwanted union. One reform pared back union officials’ ability to use “blocking charges” to stop worker-requested decertification elections from happening. The reform instead created a process in which charges surrounding an election are litigated after employees have gotten to exercise their right to vote. Instead of applying this rule, NLRB Region 22 dismissed Morley and her coworkers’ requested election.

The Request for Review notes that NLRB Region 22’s complaint, which incorporated AGVA union officials’ unproven allegations against the employer, does not appear designed to help workers “but rather to twist the law and facts beyond recognition in order to aid the current [NLRB] General Counsel’s ideological crusade to overturn decades of settled Board law about bargaining obligations and employer free speech.” Biden-appointed NLRB General Counsel Jennifer Abruzzo, a former union lawyer, has thrown her weight behind other recent cases to uproot longstanding NLRB precedent, often to give more power to union bosses at the expense of workers’ freedom.

“Aided by regional NLRB officials, AGVA union officials seem determined to send the individual rights of Medieval Times workers back to the Dark Ages,” commented National Right to Work Foundation President Mark Mix. “NLRB election rules clearly forbid union officials from using completely unproven charges of employer misconduct to derail workers’ ability to have a vote on whether they want continued union representation.”

“Federal labor law is supposed to protect the fundamental right of workers to freely decide who will speak for them in workplace matters, and Foundation staff attorneys will fight for Morley and her coworkers as AGVA bosses try to turn this commonsense principle on its head,” Mix added.

The National Right to Work Legal Defense Foundation is a nonprofit, charitable organization providing free legal aid to employees whose human or civil rights have been violated by compulsory unionism abuses. The Foundation, which can be contacted toll-free at 1-800-336-3600, assists thousands of employees in about 200 cases nationwide per year.

Big upgrades coming to Riverside County Park (South) in NA & Lyndhurst

Bergen County recently received a matching $1 million grant from the NJ Department of Environmental Protection and the Garden State Preservation Trust (GSPT) to construct a completely inclusive playground at Riverside County Park South, in North Arlington and Lyndhurst, County Executive James J. Tedesco III, the Bergen County Board of Commissioners and the county’s Parks Department said.Completely inclusive playgrounds, or adaptive playgrounds, allow for people of all age groups and abilities to enjoy the county park. Features o...

Bergen County recently received a matching $1 million grant from the NJ Department of Environmental Protection and the Garden State Preservation Trust (GSPT) to construct a completely inclusive playground at Riverside County Park South, in North Arlington and Lyndhurst, County Executive James J. Tedesco III, the Bergen County Board of Commissioners and the county’s Parks Department said.

Completely inclusive playgrounds, or adaptive playgrounds, allow for people of all age groups and abilities to enjoy the county park. Features of these playgrounds include proper safety surfaces, shading, fencing and a quiet play area. These features will be supported by improved lighting, safer walking routes within the park, new pedestrian access points and closer parking facilities.

“It is important to make sure that our residents of all abilities are accommodated here in Bergen County,” Tedesco said. “Our mission to create completely inclusive playgrounds in our county parks serves as a reminder that we are committed to addressing the needs of our community, and that we will always have the people at the forefront of everything we do.”

County Commissioner Steven A. Tanelli, who is the commission’s liaison to the parks department, agrees.

“Every child in Bergen County deserves the opportunity to play with their friends in a safe environment that is responsive to their needs, Tanelli, of North Arlington, said. “This grant ensures our commitment to not only construct more inclusive playgrounds across the county but also our wish to see all children, regardless of their challenges, be kids.”

The project is expected to go out to bid for construction later this fall. The $1 million follows guidance outlined by Jake’s Law, which was signed in August 2018 by Gov. Philip D. Murphy to encourage counties to construct inclusive playgrounds for children and adults with disabilities.

The addition of a completely inclusive playground is part of the third phase of the ongoing Riverside County Park revitalization project.

In accordance with the 2019 Bergen County Parks Master Plan, the county has invested in increasing the park’s offerings and expanding recreational opportunities. Phase one and two of the park’s overhaul includes the construction of a rowing center to provide unprecedented access to the Passaic River, a new amphitheater for community performances, new restrooms, paved walking paths and more.

Check back for updates to this story.

Lyndhurst’s second-annual Car Show, sponsored by Mayor Robert B. Giangeruso, the Lyndhurst Board of Commissioners and numerous local businesses, is set for Sunday, Oct. 1, from noon to 5 p.m. at Town Hall Park, Delafield and Valley Brook avenues. The rain date is Oct. 8.

Live music will be provided on the big stage by The Cameos. Food and beverages will be sold by street vendors. If the car show must be postponed by the weather, the Cameos will still perform, but indoors at the Lyndhurst Middle School, on Oct. 1.

For those who bring their cars, there will be a $20 entrance fee per vehicle. No pre-reg is required, but day-of registration will kick off at 9 a.m. Trophies will be awarded for all car classes. Donations will also be accepted at the show to benefit the Csapo Family.

Beginning at 10 p.m., Friday, Sept. 15, until 9 p.m. Sunday, Sept. 17, Route 7 is scheduled to be closed and detoured in both directions before the Wittpenn Bridge to test and make adjustments to the lift span machinery on the new bridge. If the work is completed early, the bridge will reopen sooner. The following detours will be in place:

Route 7 eastbound detour:

Route 1&9 southbound to Route 7 westbound detour:

Swan Song for Beloved Lyndhurst Karaoke Bar Lee’s Hawaiian

Driving to Lee’s Hawaiian Islander for the first time earlier this year for a friend’s birthday celebration, I admit I was skeptical. I knew nothing about the restaurant, other than that one of our group had grown up in Bergen County and frequented Lee’s decades ago.After a few wrong turns, we pulled into the parking lot on a dark, run-down commercial street in Lyndhurst. Inside, the kitschy decor looked unchanged from its opening more than a half-century ago, in 1972, with glowing Tiki masks, a rock waterfall wall, ...

Driving to Lee’s Hawaiian Islander for the first time earlier this year for a friend’s birthday celebration, I admit I was skeptical. I knew nothing about the restaurant, other than that one of our group had grown up in Bergen County and frequented Lee’s decades ago.

After a few wrong turns, we pulled into the parking lot on a dark, run-down commercial street in Lyndhurst. Inside, the kitschy decor looked unchanged from its opening more than a half-century ago, in 1972, with glowing Tiki masks, a rock waterfall wall, tree branches with fake birds, plastic flowers on the tables and white Christmas lights everywhere.

It took only one drink—I can’t remember if it was a Mai Tai or a Zombie, served in a Tiki mug with an umbrella, of course—to convert my skepticism into something like joy. By the time the requisite Pu Pu platter arrived, a few of our group of ten had grabbed microphones and were belting out “It’s Raining Men” alongside Bill, our spry, white-haired karaoke DJ, who sported a spangly “That Guy” hat and a black sequin-studded jacket.

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Increasingly raucous renditions of “Thriller,” “Single Ladies” and golden oldies like “LeRoy Brown” and “Band of Gold” followed. Even the shyest among us hammed it up at the mike, and other patrons took turns, too; before long we were all on our feet, mingling and dancing. One couple invited us to their monthly karaoke night in Newark; a middle-aged business man circulated among us, handing out his business card and asking for dances.

We went home laughing and woke the next morning giggling, as photos and videos of our escapades pinged from phone to phone.

When I heard recently that Lee’s Hawaiian is for sale (for $2.3 million), I wasn’t too surprised. It was less than a third full the Friday night we were there, the food is mediocre, the drinks are so strong that you only need one, and it isn’t exactly on anybody’s list of hot new restaurants.

But I sure hope it doesn’t sell soon, and was glad to learn from an employee that they plan to stay open until they have a buyer. There are hundreds of places in New Jersey where you can get a better meal in a modern, gleaming restaurant. There’s only one I know of where you can sing and dance with new and old friends and time-travel back to a simpler, happier time.

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