Hormone Replacement Therapy in Fairview, NJ | Juventee Medical Spa

HRT -Hormone Replacement Therapy in Fairview, NJ.

Is HRT for Women the Right Answer?

To live a healthy life, hormone stability is very important for women. That's where the beauty of HRT treatments for women begins to shine because it balances hormones that would otherwise be altered due to menopause.

HRT treatments for women represent a revolutionary step toward living life without the pitfalls of old age. However, at Juventee, we understand that no two women, and by proxy, patients, are the same. That's why our team of doctors and specialists provide personalized treatment options for women, combining holistic treatment, nutrition, fitness plans, and more to supplement our HRT treatments.

Is HRT the answer if you feel exhausted, overweight, and moody? That's the million-dollar question that we're asked almost every day. And to be honest, it's hard to say without a comprehensive exam by an HRT expert at Juventee. What we can say is that when a woman's hormones are better balanced during menopause, she has a much better chance of enjoying life without the crippling symptoms that other women feel.

At Juventee, helping women reclaim their vitality and love of life is our top priority. While some HRT clinics see patients as nothing more than a means to make money, our team is cut from a different cloth.

A New Youthful You Awaits at Juventee

If you are considering HRT treatments for women in Fairview, NJ, you need a team of hormone replacement experts by your side. At Juventee, our knowledgeable HRT doctors are ready to help. Our team will answer your initial questions, conduct necessary testing, and craft a customized program designed to alleviate the challenges you're facing as a woman going through menopause.

With a healthy diet, exercise, positive life choices, and hormone replacement therapy, unveiling the new "you" is easier than you might think. Contact our office today to get started on your journey to optimal health and well-being.

Hormone Therapy Fairview, NJ

Latest News in Fairview, NJ

Attend a Summer Camp Open House at Fairview Lake YMCA Camps

By Mollie ShaugerPublishedJanuary 9, 2023 at 3:59 PMNEWTON, NJ - Families from across New Jersey, New York and Pennsylvania are invited to learn more about Summer Day Camp and Sleepaway Camp programs operated by Fairview Lake YMCA Camps during a series of Open Houses starting on Jan. 15.Participants can tour camp, talk with staff and ask questions. Refreshments will be provided. Dates include:Fairview Lake YMCA CampsSign Up for FRE...

By Mollie Shauger

PublishedJanuary 9, 2023 at 3:59 PM

NEWTON, NJ - Families from across New Jersey, New York and Pennsylvania are invited to learn more about Summer Day Camp and Sleepaway Camp programs operated by Fairview Lake YMCA Camps during a series of Open Houses starting on Jan. 15.

Participants can tour camp, talk with staff and ask questions. Refreshments will be provided. Dates include:

Fairview Lake YMCA Camps

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Lake in the Woods Day & Sleepaway Camps at Blair Academy

Click here to RSVP for an Open House.

Fairview Lake YMCA campers enjoy a wide range of activities in a beautiful, fun, and adventurous setting.

With easy access to the Appalachian Trail and Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area, the campus provides an ideal setting for children who want to explore the natural world in one of our Environmental Trips for Challenge programs.

Those seeking a more traditional camp experience can choose from four traditional sleepaway camps that offer a variety of activities to challenge campers, while promoting their confidence and independence.

Families can also learn more about the range of specialty camp options that foster their child’s interests in horseback riding, animals, arts, science, sports and more.

Blue Mountain Day Camp is another way for local children to experience the great outdoors, build skills and confidence, and make lifelong friends, while spending nights at home.

All camps are accredited by the American Camp Association and transportation is available, including daily bus transportation from surrounding towns to Blue Mountain Day Camp.

Returning for 2023 is Lake in the Woods Day and Sleepaway Camp, held on the campus of Blair Academy in Blairstown and operated by Fairview Lake YMCA Camps. Day and sleepaway campers are divided into groups based on age and engage in a variety of activities and special events based on session themes. Activities include archery, boating, fishing, art & crafts, performing arts, swim lessons, traditional and unique sports, hiking, and more. During sleepaway camp, campers stay on campus Monday - Friday and head home after activities on Friday for the weekend. Transportation for sleepaway campers is included. Register for Open Houses at Lake in the Woods here.

Camp Early Bird 2 rates end Jan. 31. For more information, visit fairviewlakeymca.org or call 973-383-9282.

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About Fairview Lake YMCA Camps

Fairview Lake YMCA Camps, an ACA accredited camp, has been helping children realize their potential since 1915. Experienced, dedicated staff help youth build confidence and self-esteem through a wide range of activities. Staff receive regular training in child protection and sexual abuse prevention. Fairview Lake Y runs a variety of programs throughout the year, including an annual Summer Day Camp, Weekly Sleepaway Camps, Environmental Education Programs, and Weekend Retreats.

ABOUT THE Y

Established in 1885, the Metropolitan YMCA of the Oranges invests in its diverse communities to promote wellness, safety and quality of life for children, adults and seniors. Its seven branches in East Orange, Livingston, Maplewood, New Milford, Hardyston, Stillwater and Wayne are committed to nurturing the potential of kids, promoting healthy living and fostering a sense of social responsibility through an array of programs. Some 35,000 people belong to the Metro Y, which awards more than $2 million annually in direct and indirect financial assistance.

Editor's Note: This advertorial content is being published by TAPinto.net as a service for its marketing partners. For more information about how to market your business on TAPinto, please email [email protected].

FRANCISCAN COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT CENTER OPENS REIMAGINED FOOD PANTRY SPACE IN FAIRVIEW

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: April 26, 2023CONTACT:Derek [email protected] COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT CENTER OPENS REIMAGINED FOOD PANTRY SPACE IN FAIRVIEWFairview, NJ – The Franciscan Community Development Center of Fairview celebrated the grand re-opening of its food pantry space, which after months of renovation has b...

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:

April 26, 2023

CONTACT:

Derek Sands

[email protected]

FRANCISCAN COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT CENTER OPENS REIMAGINED FOOD PANTRY SPACE IN FAIRVIEW

Fairview, NJ – The Franciscan Community Development Center of Fairview celebrated the grand re-opening of its food pantry space, which after months of renovation has been transformed into a client choice pantry model for the residents of Fairview, the first of its kind in the community.

Made possible by a partnership between Bergen County, the Archdiocese of Newark, the Community Food Bank of New Jersey, and Habitat for Humanity of Bergen County – demolition of the existing pantry began in October 2022, with pantry operations moving to a temporary space on church grounds. With the help of the Habitat for Humanity Grey Heads and donated services and materials from RSC Architects and the Kuiken Brothers Company, the pantry was rebuilt and reimagined from the ground up. Improvements to the space include a redesigned layout that will allow for the client choice pantry model, a new walk-in refrigerator and freezer to help Franciscan receive more perishable items like meats and fresh produce, a redesigned loading and receiving area for deliveries, and a new ADA compliant entrance and bathroom for clients among others. The opening of the new pantry space will also allow FCDC to convert their temporary pantry space to help provide additional services and programs for clients.

“The Franciscan Community Development Center is a community lifeline for thousands of residents in eastern Bergen County every single day. Thanks to critical funds provided by the County’s Food Security Task Force and the pro-bono efforts of several local partners, the newly completed renovations grant the FCDC the ability to expand their efforts and continue to serve their residents with the dignity and respect they deserve,” said Bergen County Executive Jim Tedesco. “Know that Bergen County remains steadfast in our commitment to support our emergency food providers through the Task Force as we work towards ending hunger in Bergen County once and for all.”

“Today we unveil a new beginning at the FCDC, to expand food access with dignity,” said Bergen County Commissioner Tracy Zur. “This renovation, which exemplified collaboration between all sectors, will enable a choice-style food pantry and an even greater abundance of healthy food to be distributed. They will be changing health outcomes and changing lives.”

“Thank you to the many partners in this project, who through their efforts will help turn Fairview from a food desert to an oasis,” said Su Colacurcio, Director of the Franciscan Community Development Center. “The work that everyone has put in here lives up to the code of St. Francis: we did what was necessary and what was possible – in order to make the impossible happen.”

It was truly a privilege to work on this project with such a dedicated group of people who do so much for their community,” said Theresa Caparreli, Executive Director of Bergen County Habitat for Humanity.

Throughout the construction and renovation of the pantry, Franciscan remained open and continued to serve the nearly 800 families and 4000 individuals that come through their doors every month. The improvements made at the food pantry will help FCDC continue to meet the needs of the community they see every day and continue serving the residents of Fairview with the dignity and respect that they deserve.

Firefighters say teens rescued from flooded tunnel in New Jersey should serve as cautionary tale

EDGEWATER, N.J. -- Sunday's floodwaters turned frightening for two teens in New Jersey.They were trapped in an abandoned train tunnel between Edgewater and Fairview. Rescuers could only reach them using...

EDGEWATER, N.J. -- Sunday's floodwaters turned frightening for two teens in New Jersey.

They were trapped in an abandoned train tunnel between Edgewater and Fairview. Rescuers could only reach them using a raft.

It's known to locals as the "Devil's Hole" -- a mile-long dark and abandoned rail line that has inspired all sorts of urban legends.

On Sunday afternoon, it also became the scene of a cautionary tale.

"When we got here it was just a muddy disaster," Edgewater Fire Department Lt. Thomas Quinton Jr. said.

Quinton and Lt. Robert Jacobson got the emergency call around 4:30 p.m. for a water rescue inside the Edgewater Fairview Train Tunnel. Two 14-year-old boys had been exploring the secret passageway when it started flooding during a severe storm. The water levels were so high, firefighters had to swim to them with a boat in tow.

"They looked cold. They were sitting on a pipe and kind of hugging it. Part of them was in the water. They said they were there for two hours. It couldn't have been comfortable," Quinton said.

Firefighters said the teens were clearly remorseful about what they'd done, explaining they read about the attraction on weirdnj.com and entered the tunnel from a cemetery on the Fairview side, intending to exit in Edgewater.

"They got to a point where they couldn't go back and they couldn't go forward. They managed to get cell service and we got involved," Jacobson said.

"We let them know before we got out that they would have to call their parents. They didn't seem too excited about that. They said their parents didn't know yet," Quinton added.

The rescue had prompted questions about safety. The tunnel is owned by the New York, Susquehanna & Western Railway. The Edgewater side is locked and a spokesperson said Monday improvements are being made to the Fairview side.

"I don't think people should be entering this at all. It's obviously dangerous in there. There's water conditions. There are trip hazards. Who knows what kind of metals. Debris is there on the ground that could hurt you," Jacobson said.

It's a lesson the boys told firefighters they've definitely learned.

Christina Fan

Christina Fan joined CBS2 News as a general assignment reporter in spring of 2019.

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7 Bergen County towns under boil water advisory for E. coli. Here's what you should do

Seven towns in Bergen County are under a boil water advisory after E. coli was detected within a water distribution system following a water main break.Fairview, Cliffside Park, Ridgefield, Edgewater, Fort Lee, Palisades Park and Leonia were notified by Veolia Water New Jersey after 9 p.m. on Thursday after test results returned.The boil water advisory remains in effect. New water samples will be collected on Saturday morning, for testing by the NJ Department of Environmental Protection & Energy, according to...

Seven towns in Bergen County are under a boil water advisory after E. coli was detected within a water distribution system following a water main break.

Fairview, Cliffside Park, Ridgefield, Edgewater, Fort Lee, Palisades Park and Leonia were notified by Veolia Water New Jersey after 9 p.m. on Thursday after test results returned.

The boil water advisory remains in effect. New water samples will be collected on Saturday morning, for testing by the NJ Department of Environmental Protection & Energy, according to a message sent out to Leonia residents. The earliest that the boil water advisory might be lifted would be Sunday afternoon.

Residents are also reminded that Veolia does not recommend the use of water filters during the boil water advisory and that they will not be effective.

Additional water tests were performed after a water main break occurred in Ridgefield on Monday night during a rainstorm. The water main break wasn't fully repaired until Tuesday followed by additional water tests.

Veolia, formerly Suez Water, takes over 7,000 water quality tests a month normally, Debra Vial, a spokeswoman for Veolia said. Additional tests came back clear Tuesday, but it takes 24 hours for the E. coli test to return. After a trace amount of E. coli returned, the state required the company to validate the results with additional tests, which came back Thursday night.

"One of the many tests indicated a trace amount, which triggered a boil water before drinking advisory," Vial said.

E. coli indicates that water may be contaminated with human or animal wastes. "Human pathogens in these wastes can cause short-term effects, such as diarrhea, cramps, nausea, headaches, or other symptoms," Veolia warned. "They may pose a greater health risk for infants, young children, the elderly, and people with severely compromised immune systems."

Bacterial contamination can occur when increased run-off enters the drinking water source, like during the heavy rains earlier this week. It can also happen due to a break in the distribution system pipes or a failure in the water treatment process.

Additional test results are scheduled to return Friday night and if needed Saturday that will determine when the advisory will be lifted.

Veolia began flushing all the pipes in the area with high velocity water to clear the E. coli. Phone messages were sent to customers and town officials were notified and began issuing their own warnings to residents. The same notification process will take place once clean test results are received.

Tens of thousands of water bottles were distributed to the effected towns in senior housing areas. A water tanker is also available on Brinkerhoff Avenue in Fort Lee.

What should you do now?

Do not drink the water.

Residents are instructed to bring tap water, even if it is filtered, to a rolling boil for one minute and allow it to cool before using for the following: drinking, cooking, or baking, making ice cubes, taking medication, brushing teeth, handwashing dishes, washing food, mixing baby formula or food, mixing juices or drinks, feeding pets, and all other consumption. Boiling kills bacteria and other organisms that may be present in the water. Water does not have to be boiled for showering or washing clothes.

What do I do once the advisory is lifted?

After a notice has been lifted, you should flush household pipes, ice makers, water fountains, etc., prior to using for drinking or cooking. Flushing simply means letting the water run to ensure that no contaminated water remains in your pipes. Follow these guidelines for flushing:

'Access with dignity': Franciscan food pantry in Fairview is back as 'choice-style'

3-minute readFAIRVIEW — The Franciscan Community Development Center of Fairview celebrated the grand reopening of its food pantry space, which after months of renovation has been transformed into a client-choice pantry model, the first of its kind in the community.The improvements were made possible by a partnership among Bergen County, the Archdiocese of Newark, the Community Food Bank of New Jersey and Habitat for Humanity of Bergen County. The demolition of the existing pantry began in October 2022, wi...

3-minute read

FAIRVIEW — The Franciscan Community Development Center of Fairview celebrated the grand reopening of its food pantry space, which after months of renovation has been transformed into a client-choice pantry model, the first of its kind in the community.

The improvements were made possible by a partnership among Bergen County, the Archdiocese of Newark, the Community Food Bank of New Jersey and Habitat for Humanity of Bergen County. The demolition of the existing pantry began in October 2022, with pantry operations moving to a temporary space on church grounds.

“Today we unveil a new beginning at the FCDC, to expand food access with dignity,” said Bergen County Commissioner Tracy Zur, also the liaison to the task force. “This renovation, which exemplified collaboration between all sectors, will enable a choice-style food pantry and an even greater abundance of healthy food to be distributed. They will be changing health outcomes and changing lives.”

The Bergen County Food Security Task Force helped with grants in Fairview and throughout the county’s other food pantries with $15,000 grants. Zur said there have been two rounds of grants with more than 60 applicants. Money has gone toward refrigerators, freezers, computers and anything else needed to be long-term sustainable.

“We are trying to make sure they’re ready for the marathon of food insecurity from the pandemic,” Zur said. “In the 2008 recession, studies showed the peak of food insecurity was two years later and didn’t recede back for almost a decade.”

In Fairview, the original plan was to fix the floor. When work began, larger challenges were discovered and the center began working with the Archdiocese of Newark and Habitat for Humanity for “generous donations” where the whole community rallied to get the pantry back up and functioning, Zur said.

The Habitat for Humanity Grey Heads donated services and materials from RSC Architects and the Kuiken Brothers Company helped rebuild the pantry from the ground up.

“Thank you to the many partners in this project, who through their efforts will help turn Fairview from a food desert to an oasis," The Franciscan Community Development Center Director Su Colacurcio said. "The work that everyone has put in here lives up to the code of St. Francis: we did what was necessary and what was possible, in order to make the impossible happen.”

Improvements to the space include a redesigned layout that will allow for the client's choice pantry model and a new walk-in refrigerator and freezer to help receive more perishable items including meats and fresh produce. There is a new loading and receiving area for deliveries and a new ADA-compliant entrance and bathroom. The opening of the new pantry space will also allow FCDC to convert its temporary pantry space to help provide additional services and programs for clients.

At the peak of the pandemic, the pantry served 1,800 people per month — and now it’s climbed to over 4,000. “The sisters have really taken on this mission with full hearts to make sure the community’s nutrition needs are provided for,” Zur said. “They’re helping residents with the dignity of hot meals, culturally appropriate food, and healthy options.”

Throughout the construction and renovation of the pantry, Franciscan remained open and continued to serve nearly 800 families and 4,000 individuals.

“The Franciscan Community Development Center is a community lifeline for thousands of residents in eastern Bergen County every single day,” Bergen County Executive Jim Tedesco said. “Know that Bergen County remains steadfast in our commitment to support our emergency food providers through the Task Force as we work toward ending hunger in Bergen County once and for all.”

During the pandemic, many pantries were forced to offer pre-packaged boxes of food. Now, there is space to give people the opportunity to pick out their own food as if they were in a supermarket and have a choice. “It’s a big step toward empowerment and be able to pick out dietary needs and culturally needed food and more healthy food options,” Zur said.

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